English as a Second Language/word choice

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Question
Dear Amy,
Here is the information you requested:
http://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/yet_1?q=yet

The following is my questions:

1. Visitors cannot sit in Row G because those seats are already reserved.
 Visitors couldn’t sit in Row G because those seats are already reserved.

(1.)   Does “cannot” in the first sentence and “couldn’t” in the second indicate “ability” or “permission’?

(2.)    What can be taken in place of “cannot” and “couldn’t’? “are/were not allowed to”?

2. I should go now. I am almost late for work.
 If you leave now, you should get there at 10 p.m.

(1.)    What is the difference between “should’ in the first sentence and the one in the second?

If you are injured in a car accident, you may claim damages from your insurance company.

(2.)    Does it mean the same if I replace “claim damages” with “make a claim”?

3. If you lose something in a store, you can go back there to claim it.

(1.) In the sentence, may I say, “If you have lost something in a store…”? What is the difference?

Commuters on this road often face traffic delays during rush hour.
Commuters on this road often get stuck in traffic during rush hour.

(2. )  Do both sentences have identical meanings?

4. I am sorry for the delay in my response to your e-mail.

(1.)  Does it mean the same if I say, “ I am sorry for the delay in replying to your e-mail”?

I have to delay moving out because I still can’t find a suitable place.

(2. ) In the sentence, may I say also, “…because I  still can’t find what I am looking for”?

5. After a tearful goodbye with his family at the airport, he embarked on a journey to study abroad.

(1.) In the sentence, may I say also, “…he embarked on a study tour abroad”?

After a tearful goodbye with his family, he embarked on the ship for a adventurous journey.

(2.)    What can be taken in place of “embarked on the ship”? “Got on the ship”, “boarded the ship”, “went on board” or “got aboard the ship”?

Answer
Thanks for sharing this link with me...

http://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/yet_1?q=yet

In my opinion, expressions like " I didn't receive a letter from him yet." are not grammatically correct, yet people use it in informal contexts.

The following is my questions:

1. Visitors cannot sit in Row G because those seats are already reserved.
Visitors couldn’t sit in Row G because those seats are already reserved.

(1.)   Does “cannot” in the first sentence and “couldn’t” in the second indicate “ability” or “permission’? permission

(2.)   What can be taken in place of “cannot” and “couldn’t’? “are/were not allowed to”? yes, that's appropriate

2. I should go now. I am almost late for work.
If you leave now, you should get there at 10 p.m.

(1.)   What is the difference between “should’ in the first sentence and the one in the second?
I should go now = I really have to go now.
... you should get there = chances are, you are going to be able to get there...

If you are injured in a car accident, you may claim damages from your insurance company.

(2.)   Does it mean the same if I replace “claim damages” with “make a claim”? yes

3. If you lose something in a store, you can go back there to claim it.

(1.) In the sentence, may I say, “If you have lost something in a store…”? no difference
What is the difference? none

Commuters on this road often face traffic delays during rush hour.
Commuters on this road often get stuck in traffic during rush hour.

(2. )  Do both sentences have identical meanings? not necessarily. Facing traffic means there is a lot of traffic during rush hour; getting stuck in traffic means there is actually a gridlock

4. I am sorry for the delay in my response to your e-mail.

(1.)  Does it mean the same if I say, “ I am sorry for the delay in replying to your e-mail”? yes

I have to delay moving out because I still can’t find a suitable place.

(2. ) In the sentence, may I say also, “…because I  still can’t find what I am looking for”? yes

5. After a tearful goodbye with his family at the airport, he embarked on a journey to study abroad.

(1.) In the sentence, may I say also, “…he embarked on a study tour abroad”? no

After a tearful goodbye with his family, he embarked on the ship for a adventurous journey.

(2.)   What can be taken in place of “embarked on the ship”? “boarded the ship”  

English as a Second Language

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Amy Baker

Expertise

I can answer question about grammar, spelling, syntax, idioms, reading and/or writing that pertain to English as a Second Language. I am knowledgeable about both TOEFL and IELTS.

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I'm a certified ESL teacher with 12 years of experience teaching K-12 and adults.

Education/Credentials
BSc MEd TESL post grad program for k-12 TESL post grad program for adult ed

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