English as a Second Language/word choice

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Question
1.Whatever we do, we should not ignore the negative feedback we have received from customer surveys.

(1.) What can be taken in place of “ignore”? “Overlook” or what else?

The board decided to approve our plan, even though it was the most expensive option under consideration.

(2.) Does it mean the same if I say, “…even though it was more expensive than other options under consideration.”?

2.Because I have only worked here for six months, I am not yet qualified to serve as a board member.

(1.) Does it mean the same if I say, “…I am still not qualified to serve as a board member.”?

Since the delivery truck was having trouble finding the building, I went outside to look for it.

(2.)Does it mean the same if I replace “having trouble” with “having difficult” or “having a hard time”?

3.May I please speak to the person who is responsible for maintaining the website?

(1.)In the sentence, may I just say, “May I please speak to the person maintaining the website”?

I like to send gifts on very special occasions, like birthdays and wedding anniversaries.

(2.)I wonder if I can say “…send gifts on personal occasions” in the sentence? If not, may I use the phrase this way? “My neighbor is very nice and friendly. He often greets me on personal occasions”?

4.When I asked her if she would come, she gave a vague answer.

(1.) What is another way to say “…she gave a vague answer”?

Students feel much more inspired to learn English when watching their favorite shows.

(2.) In the sentence, may I change “feel” to “are”? What is the difference?

5.He can’t get along with his classmates and often feels isolated from them.

(1.) What can be taken in place of “isolate”?

The funds were fully withdrawn from the account.

(2.)Is it correct to say “fully withdrawn” in the sentence or is there a difference way to say the sentence?

Answer
1.Whatever we do, we should not ignore the negative feedback we have received from customer surveys.

(1.) What can be taken in place of “ignore”? “Overlook” or what else? neglect, disregard

The board decided to approve our plan, even though it was the most expensive option under consideration.

(2.) Does it mean the same if I say, “…even though it was more expensive than other options under consideration.”? not entirely... when you say the most expensive, it means that all other options were less expensive; when you say more expensive than other options it means that it's possible that there was another offer that was the most expensive one.

2.Because I have only worked here for six months, I am not yet qualified to serve as a board member.

(1.) Does it mean the same if I say, “…I am still not qualified to serve as a board member.”? yes

Since the delivery truck was having trouble finding the building, I went outside to look for it.

(2.)Does it mean the same if I replace “having trouble” with “having difficult” or “having a hard time”? you should say "having difficulties" or "having a hard time"

3.May I please speak to the person who is responsible for maintaining the website?

(1.)In the sentence, may I just say, “May I please speak to the person maintaining the website”? yes

I like to send gifts on very special occasions, like birthdays and wedding anniversaries.

(2.)I wonder if I can say “…send gifts on personal occasions” in the sentence? yes, but most people say "special occasions"
If not, may I use the phrase this way? “My neighbor is very nice and friendly. He often greets me on personal occasions”? see above

4.When I asked her if she would come, she gave a vague answer.

(1.) What is another way to say “…she gave a vague answer”? She said something ambiguous/fuzzy/hazy.

Students feel much more inspired to learn English when watching their favorite shows.

(2.) In the sentence, may I change “feel” to “are”? What is the difference? yes, no difference.

5.He can’t get along with his classmates and often feels isolated from them.

(1.) What can be taken in place of “isolate”? secluded is the only thing that comes to mind here

The funds were fully withdrawn from the account.

(2.)Is it correct to say “fully withdrawn” in the sentence or is there a difference way to say the sentence? I'd say "All the funds were withdrawn from the account".  

English as a Second Language

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Amy Baker

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I can answer question about grammar, spelling, syntax, idioms, reading and/or writing that pertain to English as a Second Language. I am knowledgeable about both TOEFL and IELTS.

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I'm a certified ESL teacher with 12 years of experience teaching K-12 and adults.

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BSc MEd TESL post grad program for k-12 TESL post grad program for adult ed

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