English as a Second Language/word choice

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Question
1.The package has been sent. It’s on the way It’s on the way to you.

(1.) What’s another way to say “It’s on the way to you”? “It’s coming to you”?

Our staff are unable to answer customer questions due to a lack of knowledge about our products.

(2.) In the sentence, may I say also, “…customer questions because they lack knowledge about our products” or “…customer questions because they have little or no knowledge about our products”?

2. We’ve had received a number of complaints about the staff being unable to answer customer quires.

(1.)In the sentence, may I say also, “Some of the customers have complained that our staff can’t answer their quires”?

(2.) Does it mean the same if I replace “quires” with “inquires”?

3.You asked us to add an online search function to the new computer system, but we haven’t included this in the cost.

(1.) In the sentence, may I say also, “…but this is not part of the cost we discussed earlier”?

Are you learning English for work or pleasure?

(2.) Does it mean the same if I say “for work or fun”?

4.At a time when many of our rivals are struggling to survive, thanks to her efforts, business for us has never been better.

(1.) In the sentence, does it mean the same if I say, “…business for us has been the best ever”?

Please join me in a round of applause to congratulate her in her new role.

(2.)In the sentence, may I say also, “Please join me in giving her a big applause to congratulate her in the new role” or “Let’s give her a big hand/applause to congratulate her in the new role”?

5.Today I heard from Bensons, our biggest client,  that they are going out of business.

(1.) What is another way to say “they are going out of business”?  “Their business will be closed down”?

Sorry, I can’t make that decision. My manager is in charge here, but he is away.

(2.)Does the sentence imply that the manger is the one who makes important decisions there?

Answer
1.The package has been sent. It’s on the way It’s on the way to you.

(1.) What’s another way to say “It’s on the way to you”? “It’s coming to you”? you could but it would sound awkward.

Our staff are unable to answer customer questions due to a lack of knowledge about our products.

(2.) In the sentence, may I say also, “…customer questions because they lack knowledge about our products” or “…customer questions because they have little or no knowledge about our products”? yes

2. We’ve had received a number of complaints about the staff being unable to answer customer quires.

(1.)In the sentence, may I say also, “Some of the customers have complained that our staff can’t answer their quires”?  yes but "inquiries" not "quires"

I admit now knowing what "quire" means... and when I checked the dictionary I came across this http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/quire

(2.) Does it mean the same if I replace “quires” with “inquires”? I would assume the proper word here is "inquiries"

3.You asked us to add an online search function to the new computer system, but we haven’t included this in the cost.

(1.) In the sentence, may I say also, “…but this is not part of the cost we discussed earlier”? yes the meaning will change slightly though

Are you learning English for work or pleasure?

(2.) Does it mean the same if I say “for work or fun”? yes, in fact this is what I'd say, I wouldn't use "pleasure" in this context

4.At a time when many of our rivals are struggling to survive, thanks to her efforts, business for us has never been better.

(1.) In the sentence, does it mean the same if I say, “…business for us has been the best ever”? yes

Please join me in a round of applause to congratulate her in her new role.

(2.)In the sentence, may I say also, “Please join me in giving her a big applause to congratulate her in the new role” or “Let’s give her a big hand/applause to congratulate her in the new role”? yes

5.Today I heard from Bensons, our biggest client,  that they are going out of business.

(1.) What is another way to say “they are going out of business”?  “Their business will be closed down”?
either that or "they will close their business"

Sorry, I can’t make that decision. My manager is in charge here, but he is away.

(2.)Does the sentence imply that the manger is the one who makes important decisions there? yes  

English as a Second Language

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Amy Baker

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I can answer question about grammar, spelling, syntax, idioms, reading and/or writing that pertain to English as a Second Language. I am knowledgeable about both TOEFL and IELTS.

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I'm a certified ESL teacher with 12 years of experience teaching K-12 and adults.

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BSc MEd TESL post grad program for k-12 TESL post grad program for adult ed

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