English as a Second Language/word choice

Advertisement


Question
I have some questions about the letters below:

Dear Monica,
This Saturday is my birthday and I’m going to hold a party at my house. As my best friend, I really hope you will be available to come.

(1.)In the first sentence, what is another way to say “hold a party”? “Throw/have a party”?

(2.)In the first sentence, may I say also “in my house”?

(3.)In the second, should I say “since you are my best friend, I really hope…”or “As you are my best friend, I really hope you…”?

(4.)In the second, may I say also, “I really hope you will be free to come” or should I just say “I really hope you can/will come”?

There will be cake, cookies, candies, pie and other treats for everyone to enjoy at the party. Lily said she will dance for me that night. It must be very interesting and exciting. By the way, the party begins at seven o’clock, but I hope you can come a little earlier to help me prepare for the party. I am looking forward to your reply.

(5.)In the first sentence, should I say, “There will be a cake, a pie, cookies, candies and other treats for everyone to enjoy at the party”?

(6.)In the second, may I say, “..she will perform a dance for me that night”? What is the difference?

(7.)In the third sentence, does it mean the same if I say, “It will certainly/definitely be …” or “It is sure to be…”?

(8.)In the next sentence, may I say also, “I hope you can come a little earlier to help with the preparations”?

Dear Rachel,

We're going to throw a party on Saturday, June 15, to celebrate John's fiftieth birthday with a splash! Bring your swimsuits to Robert's place by 5:00 p.m. and plan to have a great time. Of course, dress will be casual. Please RSVP regrets only by June 12 so we can plan accordingly. We hope to see you there.


(9.)What is another way to say “celebrate someone’s birthday with a splash”?

(10.)What is another way to say “dress will be casual”? “You should be casually dressed”?

(11.)Does “RSVP regrets only” mean”You will respond/call only if you cannot be at the party”?

(12.)   What is another way to say “plan accordingly”?

Answer
Dear Monica,
This Saturday is my birthday and I’m going to hold a party at my house. As my best friend, I really hope you will be available to come.

(1.)In the first sentence, what is another way to say “hold a party”? “Throw/have a party”? yes

(2.)In the first sentence, may I say also “in my house”? no, that's not correct

(3.)In the second, should I say “since you are my best friend, I really hope…”or “As you are my best friend, I really hope you…”? up to you; all versions are correct

(4.)In the second, may I say also, “I really hope you will be free to come” or should I just say “I really hope you can/will come”? I'd stick to "I really hope you can come" this is an informal letter to a friend

There will be cake, cookies, candies, pie and other treats for everyone to enjoy at the party. Lily said she will dance for me that night. It must be very interesting and exciting. By the way, the party begins at seven o’clock, but I hope you can come a little earlier to help me prepare for the party. I am looking forward to your reply.

(5.)In the first sentence, should I say, “There will be a cake, a pie, cookies, candies and other treats for everyone to enjoy at the party”? no, the original is correct.

(6.)In the second, may I say, “..she will perform a dance for me that night”? What is the difference? none, but again given this is an informal text, I'd stick to "she will dance for me"

(7.)In the third sentence, does it mean the same if I say, “It will certainly/definitely be …” or “It is sure to be…”? I'd definitely change that 3rd sentence as it doesn't make sense as it's written right now. Ether one of the alternatives you suggested here is OK.

(8.)In the next sentence, may I say also, “I hope you can come a little earlier to help with the preparations”? Yes.


Dear Rachel,

We're going to throw a party on Saturday, June 15, to celebrate John's fiftieth birthday with a splash! Bring your swimsuits to Robert's place by 5:00 p.m. and plan to have a great time. Of course, dress will be casual. Please RSVP regrets only by June 12 so we can plan accordingly. We hope to see you there.


(9.)What is another way to say “celebrate someone’s birthday with a splash”? none really given it's a pool party

(10.)What is another way to say “dress will be casual”? “You should be casually dressed”? First of all "dress will be casual" is not correct in my opinion. I'd say "of course dress casually"

(11.)Does “RSVP regrets only” mean ”You will respond/call only if you cannot be at the party”? that's correct

(12.)   What is another way to say “plan accordingly”? I'd stick to it, no need to change it in the context above ... anything else you may use will sound unnatural.  

English as a Second Language

All Answers


Answers by Expert:


Ask Experts

Volunteer


Amy Baker

Expertise

I can answer question about grammar, spelling, syntax, idioms, reading and/or writing that pertain to English as a Second Language. I am knowledgeable about both TOEFL and IELTS.

Experience

I'm a certified ESL teacher with 12 years of experience teaching K-12 and adults.

Education/Credentials
BSc MEd TESL post grad program for k-12 TESL post grad program for adult ed

©2016 About.com. All rights reserved.