Entomology (Study of Bugs)/Possible Entiminae?

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I found this site while attempting to research a bug I found in my bed in suburban Los Angeles.  Needless to say, my wife and I were very concerned (freaked out actually) and thought we had a bedbug infestation.  After calming down, to me it looks like a broad-nosed weevil of the entiminae variety, and are wondering how it ended up in a residential neighborhood of a large city, not exactly in the wild.  Maybe you can help identify and provide links to some information about it.  Should I be worried?  I assume where there's one, there are hundreds.  I have two small kids to protect.

Here are my only pictures, and thank you in advance for your time.

Best,
Jeff

Answer
Jeff,

I think your id is correct (good detective work!). This is one of the root weevils, there are many species. Larvae feed on roots of plants, some are significant landscape pests such as the black vine weevil (see http://www.livingwithbugs.com/root_wev.html). Adults emerge in late summer/early fall. Adult weevils often enter homes from surrounding landscape plants. The weevils are completely harmless and can be swept up and tossed outside.

Jack DeAngelis

Entomology (Study of Bugs)

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Jack DeAngelis

Expertise

I can answer questions in any area of entomology (study of insects, spiders, mites, ticks, and other terrestrial arthropods). Contact me about home and garden insects, insects that bite and sting, and insects that damage homes such as carpenter ants and termites.

Experience

20 years as university extension entomologist, now retired; currently publish a website about home and garden insects.

Publications
see www.livingwithbugs.com/resume.html

Education/Credentials
Ph.D. in Entomology

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