Entomology (Study of Bugs)/bug identification

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Question
Bug Identification?
Bug Identification?  
Bug Identification?
Bug Identification?  
QUESTION: Hi Ed. My family and I saw this bug in our back yard on our tent screen on the outside. It was a bit big, not huge big but just big, had six legs, three on each side. It also has 2 long antlers and appears to be a very dark brown. If it helps I live in the state of Connecticut in the United States. Now the reason I am posting this info is because we have no idea wwhat bug this is. Can you identify it for us and tell us what we were looking at? I posted 2 pictures if it to help you so you can study them.

ANSWER: Dear Douglas - This is a long-horned wood-boring beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in the subfamily Prioninae. Here's one possibility, known as the broad-necked root borer - http://tinyurl.com/msldhvk
 Although they are considered pests of deciduous trees, they do not appear to be common enough to cause serious damage.

Hope this helps,
Saugy

---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

What\'s this bug?
What's this bug?  

What\'s this bug?
What's this bug?  
QUESTION: Hi now I have just one more bug for you to identify and this is the coolest and most strangest bug we have ever saw yet. And that answer to the broad-necked root borer did help a lot and since I can count on you, I will come to you for advice for now on. You are a really good help. So about this second and final bug for the week it is a green strange looking one. My dad called me downstairs and told me to go the front porch where it was to take a picture of it and so I did. He found it funny looking, strange looking, and cool looking all at the same time. It is green and was seen on my front  porch at night. It just stayed there for a while and it appeared to fly when I touched it and land a few feet away from where I got the pictures. It too has 6 legs but the very back legs seemed to be longer than the middle and front legs. Also too the rear legs seem to have a bit of an angle to them. not curved or straight out. It was all green except the eyes which were black like most bugs and had 2 skinny long antlers. I almost did not see the antlers because of how skinny they were. Two more things. There seemed to be small tiny little lines going down it body and also too there was just a little bit of a clearance between the bottom of the bug and the ground level. Use the same facts as this is in Connecticut of the U.S. and get back to me whenever you can. I apologize for throwing all these bug questions at you. This is all I have though for now so I can give you a break after this. Sorry I know it is a lot.

Answer
Dear Douglas - Your insect appears to be a greater angle-wing katydid, Microcentrum rhombifolium (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae). The family Tettigoniidae includes several types of katydids as well as cone-headed grasshoppers; angle-wings belong to the subfamily Phaneropterinae, members of which sometimes are called false katydids. See http://tinyurl.com/k7x74ms for images and more detailed information on these beautiful insects.

Hope this helps,
Saugy

Entomology (Study of Bugs)

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Ed Saugstad

Expertise

Will accept most questions in general entomology, including those related to medical entomology, taxonomy, ecology, arthropod surveillance, and pest management. If you are requesting a 'mystery bug' identification, PLEASE either attach an image to your question, or post an image on a web page (such as Flickr) so that I can look at it, as verbal descriptions frequently are insufficient for a definitive identification.

Experience

21 years in the U.S. Army as a medical entomologist; duties varied from surveillance of pest populations (including mosquitoes, cockroaches, ticks, and stored products pests) to conducting research on mosquito-virus ecological relationships and mosquito faunal studies. Ten years as a civilian analyst for the Department of Defense, primarily on distribution of vector-borne diseases worldwide. Limited experience on surveillance of agricultural insects in North Dakota and Indiana.

Organizations
Entomological Society of America, West Virginia Entomological Society, Society for Vector Ecology, National Speleological Society, West Virginia Association for Cave Studies.

Publications
American Journal of Public Health, Contributions of the American Entomological Institute, Japanese Journal of Sanitary Zoology, Journal of Economic Entomology, Mosquito News, and Mosquito Systematics.

Education/Credentials
B.S. in entomology from North Dakota State University in 1963, M.S. in entomology from Purdue University in 1967.

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