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Entomology (Study of Bugs)/Tiny Flying Bugs That Bite

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VAL wrote at 2008-01-24 05:51:03
I just want to reassure Debbie that what she is experiencing is very real. I have been plagued with the same problem. Little flying pests that fly like a jet so fast you only accidently see them. They bite especially at night . I have had sores on my head especially from the bites. Although they are not particular where they do bite. I too have tried everything.  I have been told that food grade dalmaceous earth ( not sure spelled correct) fogged in and around the house does the trick but you have to be very careful with it. I would suggest doing adequate research before using it.  I live in Oregon and have researched this extensively and there are many others with the same problem


Psychuous wrote at 2008-02-17 10:00:07
There's a type of mite that lay eggs under the skin...but that's not the mites that are biting you, that type you can't feel. If your getting bit and you can't see them, most likely its mites... One type of mite has a monster bite and are really itchy... They go for your feet and ankles and clothing edges. You can sometimes feel them running around on you but can't see them. Get the place fumigated and get rid of old rugs and fabric things they may be living in and vacuum daily... They are almost the same as dust mites but they leave large bites.. Also they don't like bug repellents and mineral spirits, same with cockroaches, they flea the area and the oil kills them and there eggs, but mineral spirits smells like week paint thinner, I've sprayed the baseboards and all doors, windows and any place they may be or travel and left for a few day to come back to a bug free apartment and the rest of the building was still infested and they didn't come back for 4 months, then i moved...lol But I would call a company and get it done right...


Amy wrote at 2010-04-26 20:07:57
Hi, I'm Amy from Finland. I have experienced the same small flies that mostly are seen when close to a lamp. I also felt biting sensation and itchy skin. I finally located the cause to be one plant and it's mold. I came to the conclusion that it was Sciaridae fly. It is a gnat/mosquito and seems to bite people too (despite the general opinion). I have now taken all the plants out of the house, I make sure there is no food around (meaning also fruits) and I keep the kitchen tables clean and dry. I have also made some traps for the rest of the flies (sugar-water-applevinegar-soap in a boal).  


Amy wrote at 2010-04-26 20:08:05
Hi, I'm Amy from Finland. I have experienced the same small flies that mostly are seen when close to a lamp. I also felt biting sensation and itchy skin. I finally located the cause to be one plant and it's mold. I came to the conclusion that it was Sciaridae fly. It is a gnat/mosquito and seems to bite people too (despite the general opinion). I have now taken all the plants out of the house, I make sure there is no food around (meaning also fruits) and I keep the kitchen tables clean and dry. I have also made some traps for the rest of the flies (sugar-water-applevinegar-soap in a boal).  


Barb wrote at 2010-07-29 12:11:50
No insect in US that lays eggs in human skin, huh? Ever hear of scabies, otherwise known as body lice,  huh?????


Dlandbob wrote at 2010-08-30 09:12:52
OMG!!!  I am online trying to see why I spent the day at the doctors because it looked like I had Hives...  My girlfriend said I was crazy because see hasn't had them, I see jet speed black spots.. My house had fruit fly's and we got rid of them but not these I take.  I moved today and no food came with us but they are here..  HELP!!!!  I had maybe 2000 bites..


Lobsterhead wrote at 2011-07-30 12:54:17
I beg to differ. Scuttle flies, whilst they do not bite, do indeed lay eggs in humans. It is called Myaisis, and can and does cause massive problems. The Scuttle fly is also known as a Coffin Fly, due to it's ability to dig down 6ft into earth, and get into coffins, where they breed in, and complete their life- cycle, in cadavers. While they do not bite, if you have an open wound, a Scuttle Fly will 'drink' the blood with it's sponge like mouth parts. They are hard bodied, ie, difficult to crush, and can inflate their abdomen with air, to avoid drowning.  


BugMad wrote at 2012-11-22 13:15:15
I have these bugs. I have tried to get them identified so far no luck. They are tiny they fly they bite hard or sting they have a similar life cycle to a bedbug. insecticides do not help even ones that have Permethrin in them. Heat above 120 degrees helps when I get enough saved up I will have my place professionally heat treated. Aroma therapy helps a little Cedar Wood oil, Lavender oil, Citronella oil and Tea Tree oil have some repelling effects but they do not completely protect me. they lay eggs in my hair so I shaved my head now they use my eyebrows and eye lashes really hate when the joves get in my eyes. I launder daily and vacuumed. Diatomaceous Earth dose kill them but some avoid it long enough to bite and a few reach adult-hood. I believe heat treating may be the only cure. Orange oil dose kill them but you have to get it on them directly and that is difficult.


BugMad wrote at 2012-11-22 16:57:30
I do not believe any of this I have these bugs and they seem to have no expert. They are a living hell only solution I see as a permenate fix is heat treating plan to save for that. diatomaceous earth only real temp comforter. and pray.  


Julian Abbio wrote at 2012-12-26 19:45:36
First i will describe (i call them white flying parasites, because in opening the car doors i see the smallest white spec imaginable flying in the sunlight against dark background). These creatures live a long time and get bigger (like a piece of white tread with ending tail (that look like a small fly and when are older they look grey because of fewer filaments). On the filaments (that they use to fly and they loose) they have round things attached (i believe are eggs). I did not even know that mites existed and will explain the sequence of what i did.    I bought a pair of pants (i bought shirts for work before in this store and there were no problems), put them on the back seat of the car. A couple of days later tried them and felt a crawling on my body, thinking it was some chemical used to dry clean them, i put them with other pants. The car, the couches, the bed and everywhere had this crawling sensation when getting on it. We trash the couches and everything that possibly harbor them. Covered the mattresses and box springs and after trash them too.

In doing so i was very efficient in putting the main source out, but where they were waiting to be moved at garbage day pickup, they spread everywhere and just going outside they get on you. From the car they got in the garage too. I kept the car in the driveway, spray it with all the things imaginable (yes even bleach), strip the seats and also used a heater inside when outside was over 100 F. Even now after few nights below 28 F, when driving i still get some on me. I sprayed around the home (cut the bushes and branches) so they would move away from the home, put mothballs in the outside basement windows and between the sliding windows panes. Put anything to be saved in boxes with mothballs and stored them in the shed. Right now there are 10 mug warmers (i made cups of aluminum foil a little smaller then the warmer because they leak when the menthol melts)  in the home (4 in the basement and 6 upstairs (2 in living room 1 in each room and 1 that i move among closets) into  where i put a teaspoon of menthol crystals 2 or 3 times a day (this is the third day). Hopefully it will get rid of them inside and winter out side. The problem is the wall between the garage and the living room and the attic. The main reason why i wrote this (also to get advices) is that in this world there should not be people that get in this situation and are treated ignorantly by the medical sector, by thinking something is wrong with their mind. Doctors, dermatologist, et-cetera, should tell them that they do not know and tell them that these thing exist, so they do not lose their minds. The hardest thing is how to rid them from your body; because otherwise nothing can be done. Right now we sleep on a queen rubber air inflated mattress, made a girt around it (included a piece of stretchable cord) and girded it underside under the mattress just about at the chest position so the covers and linen stay put when tug in it. This way when needed are easily washables. We keep the temperature at 65 F (in summer we hardly could keep it at 70 F) and these creatures right away go where is warm and moist. It was a nightmare (every time i was going in the garage to vacuum them from between my legs( the vacuum cleaner out the door (no filter)). Now after reading about (i believe the name of this gentleman is Ted) we use a mixture equally of mustard flower and water (a little (less then 5%) body glycerin and some (less than 10%) of H2O2 (peroxide) because it seems effective, in the morning and evening after we put our close in the washing machine and after spreading the mixture all over our body. In my case in order to save themself some go where we can't say and i add some more mustard mixture or try getting rid with tape. I hope this help somebody to have hope and not loose their mind. If somebody has suggestions, thank you kindly.


Entomology (Study of Bugs)

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Eric R. Eaton

Expertise

I answer insect and spider identification questions ONLY. Attach images if possible. No "what bit me?", "what do I feed this bug in captivity?", or science fair project questions please. NO TECHNICAL QUESTIONS ABOUT INSECT PHYSIOLOGY.

Experience

Principal author, Kaufman Field Guide to Insects of North America. Professional entomologist employed previously at University of Massachusetts, Chase Studio, Inc., and Cincinnati Zoo; contract work for West Virginia Department of Natural Resources, Smithsonian Institution, and Portland (Oregon) State University.

Publications
Author, Kaufman Field Guide to Insects of North America, Missouri Conservationist magazine, Ranger Rick, Birds & Blooms, Timeline (journal of the Ohio Historical Society). I have contributed to several books as well.

Education/Credentials
Oregon State University, undergraduate major in entomology, did not receive degree.

Awards and Honors
One of the top 50 experts in all categories for AllExperts.com, 2009.

Past/Present Clients
Principal author of the Kaufman Field Guide to Insects of North America, Smithsonian Institution (contract), Cincinnati Zoo (employer), Portland State University (contract), Chase Studio, Inc (employer), Arkansas Museum of Discovery (guest speaker). Currently seeking speaking engagements, leadership roles at nature festivals, workshops, and ecotours.

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