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Fertilizer/additives, superthrive

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Gardengallivant wrote at 2007-11-24 19:12:55
There has been work done to suggest B1 can be a rate limiting factor in root development for field grown plants.

http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0006-8071%28193809%29100%3A1%3C226%3AVBATGO%3E2




BeenThereSeenItAll wrote at 2007-12-02 19:53:40
This explanation by the author hits the nail on the head.  Superthrive is snakeoil plant medicine consisting of a concentrated composted biomass tea with unnecessary stinkatives and additives to "make it special".  It is probably not harmful but the cost is astronomical compared to its content and benefits.  It is the gardener version of Ronco, Oxysolve, and TV Hype commercials that give you very little in return for your money.


Don Wilshe wrote at 2008-05-17 14:31:43
Some Comments on SuperThrive.



1).  Since this product was developed in the 1930's it might be exempt from registration.

2).  Fertilizers are not managed by the EPA.

3).  Unless the product meets the minimum of 5% NPor K it cant be a Fertilizer based on state laws.




so cal gardener wrote at 2009-03-04 16:59:59
The main ingredient of benefit in Superthrive, in my opinion as a Biologist and gardener, is the 1-Napthyl acetic acid, which is a plant hormone in the auxin family. Auxins stimulate root growth. So does vitamin B, I believe, which is the other main ingredient of Superthrive. I too was frustrated by the vagueness of the information regarding this product, and agree with the other poster that it probably has something to do with labeling laws. Compare it herbal supplements in the health food store that can't make certain health claims on their labels without legally becoming a drug, thus requiring expensive clinical trials to support the claims. They clearly state on the label that you have to apply the product with a fertilizer, which makes sense because the plant still needs an organic source of building materials to support the increase in biomass.


dj wrote at 2010-01-08 18:08:52
All I know is that I went to a nursery in the Florida Keys that had grapefruit trees that had maybe 30 fruits on a tiny tree.  My similiarly sized trees in my yard give maybe 10 total a season.  Their trees were just ridiculously overloaded with fruit so I asked them, what do YOU use to get this result and they said they use a few drops of SuperThrive.  So I bought a bottle and will try it and report back here.


Aj wrote at 2010-01-10 20:24:11
I would like to add some of the best research on B vitamins and relationship with plants...



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Vitamin B1 (thiamine)

Thiamine (vitamin B1) is generally considered to be an essential ingredient for plant tissue cultures and is usually added at 0.1±5 mg l21. Biotin (vitamin H) is less common in culture media and is usually added at 0.01± 1 mg l21 (Bhojwani and Razdan, 1983; Pierik, 1987). Thiamine is an important cofactor in carbohydrate metabolism, and biotin is important in carboxylation reactions.

“Optimization of biotin and thiamine requirements for somatic embryogenesis of date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.)” in In Vitro Cellular Developmental Biology-Plant. 2001. 37(4): 1054-5476 (Print) 1475-2689 (Online)

- Thiamine is a cofactor (molecule that binds to an enzyme to help/allow it to function) important in the construction and break down of carbohydrates (for growth or energy storage/release)



Folic Acid

To varying degrees, plant folates are all unstable, particularly to oxidative cleavage into pteridine and PABA-glutamyl fragments. This oxidative degradation is promoted by light. Folates are, however, stabilized in vivo when they are bound to protein. Despite their low abundance and lability, pools of plant folates support huge metabolic fluxes... [The folate pool turnover is] several times faster than the rate of ATP turnover in leaves, which is itself very rapid.

“Synthesis and turnover of folates in plants” in Current Opinion in Plant Biology. 2002. 5(3): 244-249



Folic Acid

Folates are essential cofactors for one-carbon transfer reactions, which are central to plant metabolism.

“Synthesis and turnover of folates in plants” in Current Opinion in Plant Biology. 2002. 5(3): 244-249



Vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid)

[Pantothenic acid] is of ubiquitous occurrence and has been found essential for the growth of many bacteria and to stimulate the growth of green plants and the respiration of widely different tissues. It appears to be an essential constituent of some important enzyme systems.

“The Relationship of Inositol, Thiamin, Biotin, Pantothenic Acid and Vitamin Bb to the Growth of Yeasts.” 1940. Journal of the American Chemical Society. 62: 1204



Vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid)

Pantothenate (vitamin B5) is the universal precursor for the synthesis of the 4'-phosphopantetheine moiety of coenzyme A and acyl carrier protein, enzyme co-factors essential for key metabolic and energy-yielding pathways of all living cells.

“Organisation of the pantothenate (vitamin B5) biosynthesis pathway in higher plants” in The Plant Journal. 2004. 37(1): 61-72



Vitamin B1 (thiamine)

Thiamine occurs in animals, plants, and microbes as free thiamine and the phosphorylated forms thiaminemonophosphate (TMP), thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP), and thiamine triphosphate. These forms act as coenzymes in numerous physiological processes, including glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway, and the synthesis of nucleic acids and the niacin-containing coenzyme NADPH.

“Vitamin B1 Functions as an Activator of Plant Disease Resistance” in Plant Physiology. 2005. 138(3): 1505-15



B52: Increases growth, yield, and maturation, Makes earlier harvests, Creates larger, higher quality harvests



Kelp Meal (auxin)

Two new auxins, as yet unidentified, but unlike any of the known indolyl-acetic acid types, were also discovered in 1958 in the Laminaria and Ascophyllum seaweeds used for processing into dried seaweed meal and liquid extract. These auxins have been found to encourage the growth of more cells -- in which they differ from more familiar types of auxin which simply enlarge the cells without increasing their number. One of the auxins also stimulates growth in both stems and roots of plants, and in this differs from indolyl-acetic acid and its derivatives, which cause cells to elongate but not to divide. The balanced action of this seaweed auxin has not been found in any other auxin.

Stephenson, W.A. Seaweed in Agriculture and Horticulture: Seaweed and Plant Growth. Faber & Faber. 1968.



Vitamins

Vitamins are nitrogenous substances required in trace amounts to serve catalytic functions in enzyme systems. Plant cells grown in vitro are capable of synthesizing essential vitamins in suboptimal quantities; thus, culture media are often supplemented with vitamins to enhance growth.

“Optimization of biotin and thiamine requirements for somatic embryogenesis of date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.)” in In Vitro Cellular Developmental Biology-Plant. 2001. 37(4): 1054-5476 (Print) 1475-2689 (Online)

- Vitamins help enzymes. Enzymes run practically everything in a plant (growth, energy production etc). No vitamins = limited enzyme function = decreased growth, among other horrible things.

- folic acid Supports effective DNA duplication



Vitamin B1 (thiamine)

However, if vitamin B, is added to the medium in small amounts (0.001 mgm. per embryo), not only is the growth of the root increased, (93, 25) but the final length of the shoot may also be increased by 100 per cent or more.

“Plant Growth Hormones” in Physiological Reviews. 1938. 18(4): 524-553



Vitamin B1 (thiamine)

When vitamin B1 is applied to the roots of pea embryos it greatly increases the synthesis of vitamin C in the shoot (26). Vitamin C is also a growth factor for the shoot.

“Plant Growth Hormones” in Physiological Reviews. 1938. 18(4): 524-553



Vitamins B2, B3, B7, and folic acid

In the present study, vitamins, pyridoxine, folic acid, riboflavin, niacin, D-biotin and menadione sodium bisulphite (MSB) were used to treat pearl millet seeds to test their ability to induce resistance to downy mildew disease caused by Sclerospora graminicola. A 6 h seed-soak treatment with vitamins at 20 mM enhanced germination and seedling vigour significantly and also induced downy mildew disease resistance. Among them, MSB treatments offered 73% protection while niacin and riboflavin gave 63% and 62% protection, respectively. … The vitamin treatments had a growth promotional effect and significantly increased the yield compared with the untreated control. Possibilities for controlling downy mildew disease of pearl millet with vitamins are discussed.

“Ability of vitamins to induce downy mildew disease resistance and growth promotion in pearl millet.” In Crop Protection. 2007. 26(11): 1674-1681



Vitamin B1 (thiamine)

In earlier papers it has been shown that the growth of numerous species of plants is promoted by small additions of vitamin B1 to the soil or sand in which the plants are grown (Bonner and Greene, 1938, 1939). Vitamin B1, which is known to be essential to the growth of roots (Kogl and Haagen- Smit, 1936; Bonner, 1937b; Robbins and Bartley, 1937), is synthesized by the green leaves, and it seems probable (Bonner and Greene, 1939) that in certain species the amount of vitanlin so synthesized is not sufficient to meet the requirements for optimal root growth. The promotive effect of vitamin B1 on the growth of plants is then understandable on the basis of the role this substance plays as a root growth factor.

“On the Influence of Various Growth Factors on the Growth of Green Plants” in American Journal of Botany. 1940. 27(1): 38-42.



Vitamins B1, B3 + B6

The root growth factors, nicotinic acid and vitamin B6, in addition to vitamin B1, whose effect has previously been reported, influence particularly the growth of the root system. The effects of these substances on the general vigor of the plant may be mainly secondary and attributable to the primary influence on the root system.

“On the Influence of Various Growth Factors on the Growth of Green Plants” in American Journal of Botany. 1940. 27(1): 38-42.



Seaweed extract

The majority of fruit on control plants were found to ripen after three or four fruits had already been harvested from SWC-treated plants. Most improved fruit growth was noted when SWC was applied to plants as a foliar spray.

“Effect of seaweed concentrate on the establishment and yield of greenhouse tomato plants.” Journal of Applied Phycology. 1992. 4: 291-296



Seaweed Extract

SWC-treated plants exhibited early fruit ripening and a total fruit fresh weight increase of 17%. The number of harvested fruit were improved by about 10%.

“Effect of seaweed concentrate on the establishment and yield of greenhouse tomato plants” in Journal of Applied Phycology. 1992. 4: 291-296



Seaweed extract

“SWC stimulated early fruit ripening and production. Nearly 60 % of all the first fruit picked, and over 50% of all the second, were from plants treated with 0.2% and 0.4% SWC respectively (Fig. 4). The majority of fruit on control plants were found to ripen after three or four fruits had already been harvested from SWC-treated plants. Most improved fruit growth was noted when SWC was applied to plants as a foliar spray. … Plants sprayed with 0.4% SWC showed a 10% increase in total fruit number (results not shown) and a 17% increase in total fruit fresh weight (Fig. 6). The 0.2 % SWC spray treatment improved the average fruit weight of all harvested fruit by 11.8% (Fig. 7). A flower count at the termination of the experiment indicated that plants receiving 0.4% SWC as a foliar spray had 70% more flowers remaining than non-treated plants (Fig. 8).”

“Effect of seaweed concentrate on the establishment and yield of greenhouse tomato plants.” Journal of Applied Phycology. 1992. 4: 291-296



Seaweed extract (cytokinin)

Ramirez and Hoad (1979) showed that zeatin (a naturally occurring cytokinin) promotes flower initiation in apple. Srinivasan and Mullins (1978, 1979) reported that treating grape (Vitis vinifera L.) apices with PBA (a synthetic cytokinin) caused inflorescence and fruit development in four-week-old seedlings; without treatment, flowering did not occur until three to five years of age. There is also some evidence that cytokinin treatment can affect the gender of the flowers produced (Galoch 1980).

“Floral induction in woody angiosperms.” in New Forests. 1997. 14: 179–202

- did not mention how cytokinin may affect flower gender. Did not mention possible effects on developing seeds. Interesting though.



Seaweed Extract

“A wide range of beneficial effects have been reported from the use of liquid seaweed extracts, including increased crop yields, resistance of plants to frost, increased uptake of inorganic constituents from the soil, more resistance to stress conditions, and reductions in storage losses of fruit.”

“Cytokinin Activity of Seaweed Extracts.” In Marine Natural Products Chemistry. 1977. pp:337-344



B52 protects plants and quarantines infected tissues



Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin)

Following treatment with riboflavin, Arabidopsis thaliana developed systemic resistance to Peronospora parasitica and Pseudomonas syringae pv. Tomato, and tobacco developed systemic resistance to Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and Alternaria alternata. … Riboflavin induced expression of pathogenesis-related (PR) genes in the plants, suggesting its ability to trigger a signal transduction pathway that leads to systemic resistance.

“Riboflavin Induces Disease Resistance in Plants by Activating a Novel Signal Transduction Pathway” in Phytopathology. 2000. 90(8): 801-811



Vitamin B1 (thiamine)

We demonstrate here that thiamine, in addition to its nutritional value, induces systemic acquired resistance (SAR) in plants. Thiamine-treated rice, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), and vegetable crop plants showed resistance to fungal, bacterial, and viral infections. Thiamine treatment induces the transient expression of pathogenesis-related (PR) genes in rice and other plants. In addition, thiamine treatment potentiates stronger and more rapid PR gene expression and the up-regulation of protein kinase C activity. The effects of thiamine on disease resistance and defense-related gene expression mobilize systemically throughout the plant and last for more than 15 d after treatment.

“Vitamin B1 Functions as an Activator of Plant Disease Resistance” in Plant Physiology. 2005. 138(3): 1505-15



Vitamin B1, B3, and B7 (thiamine, niacin, and biotin)

Like the antibiotics, the vitamins also produce significant changes in host susceptibility or resistance to infection. Thus, it is evident from the data presented in Figure 3 that, in this example, whereas niacin produced an eightfold decrease in the level of parasitism when administered in .1% concentration, this effect was reduced to a 3.5-fold decrease in parasitism when the concentration was raised to the maximum tolerated dosage of .5%. On the other hand, both thiamine and biotin continue to increase host resistance with increasing concentration of the drug in the mosquito diet and produce their maximal effects on the host-parasite equilibrium at maximum tolerated concentrations.

“A Study of the Relation of Antibiotics, Vitamins, and Hormones to Immunity to Infection.” In The Journal of Immunology. 1953. 70 (1): 115-123



Vitamins B2, B3, B7, and folic acid

In the present study, vitamins, pyridoxine, folic acid, riboflavin, niacin, D-biotin and menadione sodium bisulphite (MSB) were used to treat pearl millet seeds to test their ability to induce resistance to downy mildew disease caused by Sclerospora graminicola. A 6 h seed-soak treatment with vitamins at 20 mM enhanced germination and seedling vigour significantly and also induced downy mildew disease resistance. Among them, MSB treatments offered 73% protection while niacin and riboflavin gave 63% and 62% protection, respectively. … The vitamin treatments had a growth promotional effect and significantly increased the yield compared with the untreated control. Possibilities for controlling downy mildew disease of pearl millet with vitamins are discussed.

“Ability of vitamins to induce downy mildew disease resistance and growth promotion in pearl millet.” In Crop Protection. 2007. 26(11): 1674-1681



Vitamin B1 (thiamine)

In this study, we present a novel role for thiamine as a plant defense activator that induces SAR. Thiamine activates SAR-related genes in rice, tobacco, tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum), cucumber (Cucumis sativus), and Arabidopsis and prevents several diseases caused by semibiotrophic and biotrophic pathogens.

“Vitamin B1 Functions as an Activator of Plant Disease Resistance” in Plant Physiology. 2005. 138(3): 1505-15



B52 supports survival and rapid rooting for transplants and cuttings



Vitamin B1(thiamine) + B3(niacin) + B6

In confirmation of earlier work by others (Robbins and Schmidt, 1939a), it is shown that isolated tomato roots can be cultivated indefinitely at an average growth rate of 40 mm. per week in medium containing only vitamins B1 and B6. The growth rate, however, could be increased to 60 mm. per week by the addition of nicotinic acid to the medium.

“Growth Factor Requirements of Four Species of Isolated Roots” in American Journal of Botany. 1939. 26(8): 661-665.

- Nicotinic acid = niacin



Seaweed Extract

Atzmon and Van Staden (unpublished data) recently found that root application of SWC [seaweed concentrate] to Pinus pinea seedlings improved seedling quality and increased the ability of seedlings to survive transplanting.

“Evidence for the presence of plant growth regulators in commercial seaweed products.” in Plant Growth Regulation. 1993. 13: 21-29



Seaweed Extract (auxin) and Vitamin B1 (thiamine)

If a cutting is to root, it is necessary first that root primordia be initiated, and, then that these primordia grow out into functional roots. For the first process, auxin is essential. … In addition, vitamin B, is probably essential for root growth on cuttings, although it is without effect on the initiation of root primordia. The rooting of cuttings of Camellia, Dracena and some others is strictly limited by the available vitamin B. It is probable that vitamin B1 is the “factor necessary for the growth of roots” which is produced in the leaves of leafy cuttings.

“Plant Growth Hormones” in Physiological Reviews. 1938. 18(4): 524-553



Vitamin B1 (thiamine)

Vitamin B1 is in fact a general growth factor for roots of higher plants (188). There is abundant evidence in the older vitamin literature that vitamin B1 is formed in green leaves in the light and is stored in seeds (80, 21). Thus vitamin B1 is to be considered as a plant growth hormone, since it is formed in one part of the plant and transported to another part. It affects root growth primarily because it is essential for cell division in the root meristem (1).

“Plant Growth Hormones” in Physiological Reviews. 1938. 18(4): 524-553



Seaweed Extract (cytokinins)

The application of commercial seaweed preparation has many beneficial effects on plants Metting et al. 1990). Among the effects reported is improved rooting of cuttings of several ornamentals and a significant increase in root initiation and growth. Some of these effects have been attributed to the presence of growth substances such as cytokinins, which are known to occur at relatively high levels in various seaweeds and commercial seaweed preparations.

“The effect of seaweed concentrate on the growth of Pinus pinea seedlings.” In New Forests. 1994. 8: 279-288



Vitamin B1 (thiamine)

Thiamine application also favored induction and growth of adventitious roots (Tables 1and 2). Treatment with 600 ppm thiamine had a significant effect on various parameters except root length. The treatment promoted rooting by 4.89 fold (489%), callusing by 0.51 fold (51%), sprouting by 0.39 fold (39%), root number by 2.31 fold (231%), root fresh weight by 3.21 fold (321%) and root dry weight by 1.69 fold (169%) over the respective controls. However, treatment with 400 ppm thiamine produced the significantly longest roots and the greatest thiamine dose invariably became supra-optimal for all parameters.

“Synergism Between IBA and Thiamine for Induction and Growth of Adventitious Roots in Tectona grandis” in Journal of Sustainable Forestry. 2002. 15(4): 99-112



B52 increases stress tolerance



Seaweed Extract (Betaines)

“Certain crop plants such as rice, soybeans, and potatoes lack significant amounts of betaines or any other osmoprotectant. This deficiency is the rationale for recent interest in using metabolic engineering technology to install the synthesis of osmoprotectants in such crops in order to improve their tolerance to drought, salinity, and other stresses.”

“Betaines and related osmoprotectants. Targets for metabolic engineering of stress resistance.” In Plant Physiology. 1999. 120: 945-949



Seaweed Extract

“A wide range of beneficial effects have been reported from the use of liquid seaweed extracts, including increased crop yields, resistance of plants to frost, increased uptake of inorganic constituents from the soil, more resistance to stress conditions, and reductions in storage losses of fruit.”

“Cytokinin Activity of Seaweed Extracts.” In Marine Natural Products Chemistry. 1977. pp:337-344



B 52 makes nutrients more available



Seaweed extract (auxin)

Auxin stimulates the differentiation of vascular tissue, thus increasing the supply of nutrients and hormones to developing organs and hastening their development (Bruinsma 1974).

“Floral induction in woody angiosperms.” in New Forests. 1997. 14: 179–202



Seaweed Extract

“A wide range of beneficial effects have been reported from the use of liquid seaweed extracts, including increased crop yields, resistance of plants to frost, increased uptake of inorganic constituents from the soil, more resistance to stress conditions, and reductions in storage losses of fruit.”

“Cytokinin Activity of Seaweed Extracts.” In Marine Natural Products Chemistry. 1977. pp:337-344



Kelp Meal (chelates)

Once chelated, minerals can be seven to ten times more available than in their natural form.

“Seaweed,” Microtech Production Holdings plc, 2004



Kelp Meal (chelates)

Such chelating properties are possessed by the starches, sugars and carbohydrates in seaweed and seaweed products. As a result, these constituents are in natural combination with the iron, cobalt, copper, manganese, zinc and other trace elements found naturally in seaweed. That is why these trace elements in seaweed and seaweed products do not settle out, even in alkaline soils, but remain available to plants which need them.

Stephenson, W.A. Seaweed in Agriculture and Horticulture: Seaweed and Plant Growth. Faber & Faber. 1968.



Kelp Meal (alginic acid)

“Seaweed, and seaweed products, improve the water-holding characteristics of soil and help the formation of crumb structure. They do this because the alginic acid in the seaweed combines with metallic radicals in the soil to form a polymer with greatly increased molecular weight.”

Stephenson, W.A. Seaweed in Agriculture and Horticulture: Seaweed and Plant Growth. Faber & Faber. 1968.


someoldguy wrote at 2011-02-05 01:12:25
I've been using superthrive for over 35 years.  I have done side by side test in containers, everything the same except for the addition of Superthrive in one container while keeping another without Superthrive as a control.  I'm just a garderner, not a scientist, but I see better results from rooting cuttings to genral growth and fruit/flower production.  It just works.  It is NOT a fertilizer and implying that it is is just plain disingeuous.  The stuff is what it is and it does what claims to do.  Good enough for me.  


super grow wrote at 2014-02-03 16:49:57
Its people like you who get good products banned and diluted. you having not used superthrive i am sure are a expert on the product.I can say from personaly using the earlier releses of superthrive that the product was out of this world,and did exactly as described on the label.It would double growth in hight and width at rapid rates.If you had a plant that was all but dead i would seriously recomend superthrive.Only unfortunate thing is the product as of the last few years seems to be heavyly dilutied,originaly the product was that concentrated it would actualy crystalize.  


royy wrote at 2015-02-27 16:26:50
HORMONES DO WORK ON PLANTS...YOU WILL NOT KNOW FOR SURE UNTIL YOU TRY THEM...I SUGGEST YOU DO AN EXPERIMENT AND SEE FOR YOUR SELF...ANOTHER HORMONE PRODUCT IS NITRON A35...MAKES PLANTS GROW BIG WITH GOOD RESULTS...KOREAN NATURAL FARMING IS ALONG THIS LINE ALSO...YOU MIGHT WANT TO TRY VITAZYME ALSO...AMAZING STUFF...PROVEN IN FIELD TRIALS...THE INDIAN


royy wrote at 2015-02-27 17:00:00
FORGET THE B1...SUPERTHRIVE CONTAINS HORMONES WHICH WORKS...SAME AS NITRON A35...OVERSEAS FARMERS USE ENZYMES AND HORMONES TO HELP THEIR CROPS...LESS FERTILLIZER...CAN'T AFFORD IT...DO A STUDY ON KOREAN NATURAL FARMING...EX: TAKE JUICE FROM FAST GROWING PLANT AND FEED SLOW GROWING PLANT...OLD FARMERS SELDOM CHANGE, THEY GO WITH WHAT WORKS FOR THEM...ONE KEY TO GOOD CROPS IS LEARNING HOW TO MAKE WHAT IS NEEDED BY PLANTS AVAILABLE TO PLANTS...NOT JUST FERTILIZING...TOMATOES ARE HOGS FOR FOOD, BUT YOU MUST LEARN HOW TO PRY THEIR MOUTH OPEN...RICH ORGANIC SOIL FULL OF EARTHWORMS CERTAINLY HELPS...


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Expertise

Do you know the wrong fertilizer will keep your plants from blooming? Do you know that too much Nitrogen can kill your grass, even if it does not burn the roots? Do you know that Roses need a LOT of Nitrogen to bloom -- and why is that? There's some complex chemistry in those plant foods. The secrets behind N-P-K are the key to the ultimate lawn, the the biggest flowers, the most fruits and vegetables. And if you don't get it right, you could be sorry. I'll show you what you did wrong, and how to fix it.

Experience

Homeowner with gardens indoors and outdoors, lawns back and forth. I wrote my first gardening column for our college newspaper, teaching roomates about the right way to feed those windowsills gardens. Today I look for challenges. Organic Fertilizers are the key to proper feeding of all our plants. Can you make your own fertilizer? Some people think so -- but there are side effects. I have been there, done that for 54 years and there is nothing like the voice of experience when it comes to Horticulture and Fertilizers.

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Numerous and sundry but only in college did I write about plants.

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B.A., Botany and Mass Communications.

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