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Financing -- Loans/How do banks lend out more money than they have on hand?


I've been reading this guide -

- on the basics of how banks work and am confused by the statement that "banks consistently extend more credit than they have cash".

Are you able to explain how this process works?

Banks create money in the economy by making loans. The amount of money that banks can lend is directly affected by the reserve requirement set by the Federal Reserve. The reserve requirement is currently 3 percent to 10 percent of a bank's total deposits. This amount can be held either in cash on hand or in the bank's reserve account with the Fed. To see how this affects the economy, think about it like this. When a bank gets a deposit of $100, assuming a reserve requirement of 10 percent, the bank can then lend out $90. That $90 goes back into the economy, purchasing goods or
services, and usually ends up deposited in another bank. That bank can then lend out $81 of that $90 deposit, and that $81 goes into the economy to purchase goods or services and ultimately is deposited into another bank that proceeds to lend out a percentage of it.
In this way, money grows and
flows throughout the community
in a much greater amount than
physically exists.  

Financing -- Loans

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