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Fine Art/Need to indentify artist

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mother and child
mother and child  
My mother bought this from a estate sale in SFO.The person collected very expensive artwork from all around the world.she bought this one unframed and put in a inexpensive frame..I opened and it looks like a original..we can not make the artist name to research..do you know this artist??? I was unable to attach more than one file..so I sent the entire image not close up of signature..let me know if you need that and I can send in a seperate email. thank you. Marlene

Answer
It is a signature by Kathe Kollwitz. It seems to be a lithograph and seems to be signed in pencil.

Kathe Kollwitz
(1867-1945)



Unlike Modersohn-Becker's robust and monumental depictions of motherhood, Kathe Kollwitz's imagery is marked by poverty stricken, sickly women who are barely able to care for or nourish their children. Kollwitz's art resounds with compassion as she makes appeals on behalf of the working poor, the suffering and the sick. Her work serves as an indictment of the social conditions in Germany during the late 19th and early 20th century.
The daughter of a well to do mason, Kathe Schmidt was born in East Prussia. Her father encouraged her to draw and when she was 14 years old she began art lessons. She attended The Berlin School of Art in 1884 and later went to study in Munich. After her marriage to Dr. Karl Kollwitz in 1891, the couple settled in Berlin living in one of the poorest sections of the city. It was here that Kollwitz developed her strong social conscious which is so fiercely reflected in her work. Her art features dark, oppressive subject matter depicting the revolts and uprisings of contemporary relevance. Images of death, war and injustice dominate her work. Kollwitz was influenced by Max Klinger and the realist writings of Zola and she worked with a variety of media including sculpture, and lithography.It may be argued that her work was an expression of her tumultuous life. She came into contact with some of the cities most needy people and was exposed to great suffering due to the nature of her husband's work. Her personal life was marred by hardship and heartache. She lost her son to World War I and her grandson to World War II and these losses contributed to her political sympathies.
Kathe Kollwitz became the first woman elected to the Prussian Academy but because of her beliefs, and her art, she was expelled from the academy in 1933. Harassed by the Nazi regime, Kollwitz's home was bombed in 1943. She was forbidden to exhibit, and her art was classified as "degenerate." Despite these events, Kollwitz remained in Berlin unlike artists such as Max Beckman and George Grosz who fled the country.

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Joseph B. Laskowski

Expertise

I have been researching,buying, collecting, dealing, and appraising 19th and 20th Century American Art (1850-1950) for the past 15 years. Ask me anything about this topic. I am a member of the Pennsylvania Antiques Appraisers Association.

Experience

Experienced in American Art from the period 1850-1950. This Includes Impressionism, Regionalism, Early American Modernism, Hudson River School, WPA. I have 15 years researching, collecting, dealing, and appraising in this field. Ran a Fine Art gallery for 3 years in Phoenixville, Pa. that focused on American and European art from the 1800's to contemporary works. Rare books focused on fine art monographs and catalogue raisonne.

Organizations
Pennsylvania Antique Appraisers Association
American Society of Appraisers (Candidate)

Publications
Brimfield Rush, a book written by Bob Wyss of the University of Connecticut. It details the escapades, trials and travails of myself, my ex, and other individuals who have been to Brimfield , Mass. to tame the largest flea market in North America. Maybe even the world.

Education/Credentials
American Society of Appraisers
BA from Lenoir-Rhyne University in North Carolina
Appraisal Studies at George Washington University

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