Folk Music/Name of song

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Linn wrote at 2016-03-08 02:21:46


l remember this song and am also searching for it.  it was a story/ song on a children's record. The story of Red Fox was narrated and sung.  Red fox was a boy who is lost ; he had a pony and a drum. His father finds him when they drum back and forth. It goes something like this: "Red fox had a pony with a tail as smooth as silk, eyes as bright as water and a nose as white as milk.  Red fox has an arrow and a beautiful new bow......" His father drums "where is red fox, where is red fox"  and red fox drums back "I am here I am here"


MagiKen wrote at 2016-07-22 21:00:00
I had this record as a child. It was by Columbia Records. The song is: "Red Fox has a pony, with a nose as white as milk, two eyes as soft as water, and a tail as smooth as silk. Red Fox has some arrows, and a beautiful new bow. And wherever Red Fox travels, there the bow and arrows go. Clip clop-clop goes the pony as swiftly as can be; Ping go the arrows like lightning through the trees." One day little Red Fox was riding his pony through the forest, when off in the distance he saw his father, Tall Hunter, riding on his much larger pony, a horse.

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But his father was riding strangely; with his hand tucked up behind his back. When they came together Tall hunter dismounted and took his hand from behind him. There was a present for Red Fox. It was a small Indian drum, just like Tall Hunter’s big drum. Little Red Fox picked up two sticks and began to beat on the drum wildly. No, said father, you do not beat it in this way; Indian drums are special, they talk.

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“Hello, drum," said Red Fox. Of course the drum did not answer and at first he thought his father had been joking. But Dad demonstrated with his own drum. Rhythmically Tall Hunter beat out “Da Da Dum Dum” - meaning "Where is Red Fox?”

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"Here I am!" gleefully shouted Red Fox. "No, make your drum give the answer," said father. Finally Red Fox understood. With his drum he replied, "ta ta tum! - I am here!" Father and son worked out a whole set of messages they could send using their drums.

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Now if Red Fox ever needed his dad he could beat out "da da Dum Dum? – where is Fed Fox?" until Tall Hunter responded with the same. Then, knowing Tall Hunter had received the message, Red Fox could reply, "ta ta tum – Here I am," and they could follow each other’s drum beats until they found one other.

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There was one signal that Red Fox was NEVER to use unless it was a serious emergency. It was, "ta Tum-Tum ta!" Which meant, "Run Fa-ther Run!"

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With that, Red Fox rode off with joy. What could he do to celebrate such a day? "I know," he decided, "I will ride up to the very top of Pine Mountain. I have never been to the top. Even from only part way up the view is great. I bet it would be ten times better if I was ten times higher. Now instead of three favorite things, he had four: his pony, bow and arrows, his song about them, and now his drum.

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Up the mountain he rode; sure enough the view was spectacular. But what Red Fox failed to notice was that the higher they went, the more narrow the trail got. Too late he realized that with a wall cliff to his left and a drop-off cliff to his right, the trail was too narrow for his pony to safely turn around. He did not dare stop, since that might make his pony nervous. He could only press on hoping the trail would widen enough to turn around, but it didn't. Instead it just kept getting narrower.

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Soon Red Fox's leg started to rub up against the wall cliff and was being bruised and scraped by its stones. He tried riding side saddle, but with the drop cliff on that side, it was too frightening. What should he do? Then he remembered his drum and beat out, "ta ta Tum Tum?" and listened for Tall Hunter's reply, but none came.

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"Where is Red Fox?" he thought to himself, "I am here in a lot of trouble and perhaps too high up for father to hear." Frantically he beat out the question again and again, harder and louder, until faintly, way in the distance he heard the sound of his father's large drum asking, "Where is Red Fox?"

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Unable to contain himself, Red Fox shouted, "I'm here and in lots of trouble." Then, remembering that his drum could speak louder he could, he answered with the beat of "ta ta Tum!" Question and answer came the drum beats, higher and higher went the pony. Soon is seemed like little Red Fox's heart was beating almost as loud as his drum.

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Then he said to himself, "I don't want to do it, but I must," and with that he beat, "ta Tum-tum ta! - ta Tum-tum ta," over and over again. When Tall Hunter heard the danger signal, "Run father Run," he came running up the mountain as fast as his legs would carry him. In almost no time at all he had reached Red Fox.

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Before Red Fox knew what was happening he found his father had somehow turned things around and was carrying little Red Fox in one arm and leading the pony down the mountain with the other.

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As you can see, I listened to that record it many times as a child to remember it so well. However, it helped that back in 1975 I adapted this to carry a religious message. I have used that modified story to present that message countless times at Churches. Youth Rallies, Camp Meetings, Vacation Bible Schools, Missions Retreats, Education events, and in many other venues.

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I have a puppet that plays the part of Red Fox and sings and acts out the story as I narrate.  My version is nearly the same until the end.  At that time I ask, “How many of you would like to have a drum like Red Fox had?  You could call up your Dad just to talk or if you needed to ask him a question. And, if you were ever in trouble you could beat out, “Run Father, Run,” and he would be there. Would you like that?”

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By now nearly everyone is shouting or raising their hand in response, possibly hoping to receive one as a gift.  But instead I give them a better gift. I remind them that they already have such a drum. No, it is not a cell phone. It is better and faster than that. It is called prayer.

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They have a Heavenly Father who is bigger and stronger than any old Tall Hunter. And if you want to talk to Him about anything, just pray, He already knows where you are.  And if you are in trouble, just pray, “Run Father Run!” and He will be there with you to help. I then invite them to pray as we thank God, our Father, for the great gift of being able to pray to Him.

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My main reason for finding this page was in a search to see if this was anywhere in public domain or if Sony / Columbia Records still had a legal right to it. I hope to use my version of it in a paid public performance, so, I need to know if I can legally that. Back to my search for that answer; I hope this answers many if not all of yours regarding this wonderful story.

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Pastor Ken Morrison (AKA MagiKen because I use magic tricks and well as puppets, storytelling, and other visual and verbal illustrations to teach the good news of God.) www.gospelillustrator.com


Folk Music

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Kaye McAlpine

Expertise

My main field of expertise in in traditional ballads - those commonly known as the Child ballads. Those containing executions are my particular speciality, but I am also interested in ballad structure formula, functions and narrative constructs. However, I also have interest in - and academic knowledge of - bothy ballads, and the singing tradition of Scotland - although not Gaelic song. This includes Jacobite song, political song, songs about the trades, and so on. I'm pretty au fait with traditional singers and bands too. And while I enjoy singing the songs, I'm not so sure others might enjoy listening!

Experience

I studied ballads academically, as well as Scottish literature. This extended into Scottish social customs and social history. I was the traditional music reviewer for the Edinburgh Evening News for 4 years, and have several publications to my name. I have been a freelance tutor in outreach courses from Edinburgh University on Scottish Culture and Tradition, including lifecycle customs, broadsheet ballads in Scotland, the traditional ballad and history. I am a freelance writer, have been a guest presenter on Ch4 History Hunters programme, and was a contributor to BBC Radio Scotland's 'Songlines' series on 'The Dowie Dens of Yarrow', and have advised BBC Radio Scotland researchers regarding Scottish songs and ballads from the Borders.

Publications
Books: Forthcoming: The Gallows and The Stake. Published: Compendium of Scottish Ethnology, vol. 10 'Oral Literature and Performance Culture', chapter on The Traditional and the Border Ballad; The Harris Repertoire (Scottish Text Society, co-editor), The Ballad in History (chapter on Border ballads). Journals include Folklore, The Review of Scottish Culture, Scottish Studies, and The Scottish Literary Journal. Music reviews appeared in the Edinburgh Evening News

Education/Credentials
Ph D, M. Phil, BA (Hons)

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