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Furniture Repair and Assembly/indoor fine teak furniture restoration

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QUESTION: Hi, I found a terrific mid- century teak end table made by Brown- Saltman (apparently a high- end Los Angeles firm from 1940- 1970)at the local thrift store. I want to restore it correctly, not botch the job! The flat surfaces appear to have thin veneers of teak with a shellac finish. It has one small depressed ring that dissolved the finish, a couple small grey- black black areas like water damage, a couple spots of white paint drips, and most of the exposed surfaces  are crazed. All the advice on teak restoration I've read are for teak furniture without shellac. Advice, please?

ANSWER: It would be impossible to give any advice on your project without a first hand examination.

Most teak is finished with teak oil or teak oil finish (an oil with headers added). Shellac is not a good choice where water may come in contact with the finish

Read: http://furniturerepair.net/finishFAQ.htm

---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

QUESTION: I decided the wood was light mahogany ( African mahogany?) veneer. Not teak. Sorry, I am an amateur! Veneer on the horizontal surfaces, probably solid legs and the George Jetson- type side decorations. I got some of that slow- acting orange finish remover, so will start with that. This Brown- Saltman furniture is very collectable, we saw consoles in this designer's line for near $3,000 in Palm springs. I am very excited to be able to restore this piece.
Thanks for your time, Patti

Answer
The original finish is most likely nitrocellulose lacquer. White rings are caused by water becoming imbedded in the finish (this will be gone after finish removal). Black marks are also caused by water and something else often an iron or steel object. Using oxalic acid is an effected way to remove such spots without damaging the wood or changing its color, after the finish is removed. Hope this helps make your project look its best.

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Steve Nearman

Expertise

Furniture care, preservation, conservation, repair, restoration, refinishing, gluing, gold leaf, upholstery, fire-water-smoke damage restoration, transit damage, antique restoration, brass polishing, piano refinishing, veneering, replacement parts, color matching, custom finishes, kitchen refinishing, furniture stripping, seat weaving (hand caning, rush, reed, danish cord), marble repair, antique trunk restoration, wicker restoration, upholstery and frame repairs, fine art restoration and more.

Experience

Over 45 years of professional furniture restoration services. Owner/proprietor of The Master's Touch Furniture Service in Fredericksburg, VA Web site: http://FurnitureRepair.net Founder and Director of the Professional Restorers International Web site: http://ProRestorers.org

Organizations
Founder and director of Professional Restorers International, Member Professional Refinishers Guild

Publications
http://prorestorers.org/notes/finishes.htm, http://prorestorers.org/notes/WaxPolishOil.htm, http://prorestorers.org/notes/Replacement-Reupholstery.htm

Education/Credentials
Furniture restoration has been my life's work.

Past/Present Clients
My local clients include several historical sites like, Kenmore, Mary Ball Washington's House, Rising Sun Tavern, Gary Melcher's Belmont and many private collectors of early American furniture.

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