General Networking/Lan/Wan/Implementing guest SSID


Dear Sir,

I am planning to add a dual Wan port router at my residence (penthouse).

I have one old router (which now I will use to increase the coverage @ my house)

My home network has IP cameras, NAS, wifi TVs, gaming console etc. So the dual wan port router will have guest SSID to keep my home network safe from guests accessing internet @ my home.

What  i can understand is the old router needs to be configured in bridge mode.

Now my questions are:

1) Should this old router also have guest SSID  feature, in order to use guest login everywhere in the house?

2) Is there any other way to protect home network, for eg. Using DMZ port to attach old router in AP mode (but guests wont be able to see each otherI guess -which i need)?

3) If the old router doesnt have guest SSID (and is must for guest network) then should I sell it to simply buy wifi extender to get full coverage?

I am open to any other better ideas.

Thanks in advance.

Hi Rajiv,

All of that is possible.  Some of how it has to work depends on what gear you have now.  Some gear supports what you want, others will not.  In other words, since I don't know what you have, it would be guessing how things should be setup.

BUT ... First things first.  WHY are you that worried about a guest on your network?  Do you really feel they would be a THREAT to your systems?  Aren't they just there for an evening or day, and doing email and browsing the Web?  Honestly, this is pretty paranoid.  I've been doing this stuff a long time - since the VERY beginning of the Internet and I do not run a guest SSID.  I also don't have any Shares or Services enabled that a guest could attack anyway.  Guests on my network would have to know the ID/PW to connect and the things that are Shared are NOT broadcasting their existence.

On the other hand, when I setup Internet for a friend's restaurant then YES - I setup a guest network, where each guest could not see each other and only had access to the Internet.  And ... the guests were set to a lower priority than the restaurant.  But ... you are thinking about doing this kind of thing at your house.  Honestly, this really seems like overkill unless you will be renting out rooms or apartments, and separating the tenants.

So ... why create a problem where one doesn't exist?

In any case, the "keep it simple" principle applies.  Don't create all sorts of elaborate things just for the sake of it.  You can do this several different ways.  One is to add 2nd router.  So just use the Inside router for your private network, and your outer router (directly connected to  the Internet for your guests.   Neither of these is in bridge mode.  You would just have one router plugged into the other router, both in standard routing mode.

Another way to is to configure a true guest SSID network.  Your current router may or may not support this.  If it does not, your current router may be capable of taking a 3rd party firmware like dd-wrt or tomato.  Both of these support guest SSID networks.

Log into your current router and look around the Interface.  A relatively new router may have settings under Wireless for multiple SSIDs and maybe even Guest SSID.  Look at the Help interface and search for ssid, guest, etc.

If you do buy a new router, make sure it is N capable.  BG is too old.  N has much greater speeds and range.

Good luck!


General Networking/Lan/Wan

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Jeff K


Specialist in leveraging technology toward fulfilling a customer's business objectives: enhancing revenues and giving them a competitive advantage in the marketplace.

Networks: architecture, design, monitoring and trouble-shooting
Technologies: Bandwidth Management (QoS), WAN Optimization, Application Performance Management (APM), User Experience Management


Over 20 years in computers and networking. Strong, broad-based expertise from years in Operations and Sales Engineering at major corporations and hardware vendors.

B.A., various courses in computers and networking as well as many many years of OJT (on the job training) and real-world experience.

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