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General Writing and Grammar Help/How to refer to what it is written in the subject line

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Question
Dear Ted:

Suppose that I am writing a letter of complaint or a complaint letter (Ted, which should I use?) and I want to refer to what it is written in the subject line, how should I begin the letter?

Would you please give me some examples?

As always, many, many thanks for your valuable help.

Paolo

P.S. Ted, have I correctly written the following sentence: "Suppose that I am writing a letter of complaint or a complaint letter (Ted, which should I use?) and I want to refer to what it is written in the subject line, how should I begin the letter?"

Answer
Dear Paolo:

Suppose that I am writing a letter of complaint or a complaint letter (Ted,
which should I use?) and I want to refer to what it is written in the subject
line, how should I begin the letter?  [You can use either "letter of complaint," "complaint letter," or some subject like those that I mention below.]

Would you please give me some examples?

*** The single word "complaint" is sufficient for an e-mail message, which I think you mean. Let's suppose you send your e-mail to a company that receives 100s or 1000s of e-mails each day.  If you have written "complaint" in the subject line, the person or persons who initially receive the messages will be able to forward your message to their complaint specialists.

You can also be specific:  "Defective merchandise"  "Billing problem"  "Incomplete order"

Your message should immediately begin with a reference to what is in the subject line.  In other words, complaints should be straightforward and should explain the problem thoroughly but also succinctly.

If you mean a letter sent through the postal system, the same procedure applies.  After you write the company's address and the salutation, you would center the subject of your complaint in the middle of the page and would label it as a subject.  The usual abbreviation for introducing a topic is this:

         RE:  Defective merchandise

Then, you write your letter, focusing on what the merchandise is and why you think it is defective.

Ted


P.S. Ted, have I correctly written the following sentence: "Suppose that I am
writing a letter of complaint or a complaint letter (Ted, which should I use?)
and I want to refer to what it is written in the subject line, how should I
begin the letter?"

*** Yes, it is correct.

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Ted Nesbitt

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I am the bibliographic instruction and reference librarian at a public college. Some members of the English department recommend me to their students. I offer assistance in grammar, punctuation, sentence structure, and paragraph development. My master`s thesis concerns William Faulkner`s tragic novels. I formerly taught advanced placement English at two schools in the Philadelphia area.

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I have been one of the highest-ranked volunteers in this category for more than a decade.

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B. A. and M. A in English; MSIS in Library & Information Sciences; graduate study in philosophy

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