You are here:

General Writing and Grammar Help/RE: Strip off, strip out of, strip from

Advertisement


Question
Dear Ted:

I'm sorry to get back to you with the same subject but I'm confused by your reply.

You wrote the following:

"Strip OFF" can be used, but it really sounds weird.  The other two expressions mean the same thing.

Then you gave these examples:

The burlesque dancer STRIPPED off her clothing, one piece at a time.

Jane is going to STRIP OFF/STRIP FROM her business suit and put on more casual clothing.

My question is this:

Why did you write that "strip off" sounds weird but you give/gave two examples of its use/usage? It seems to me that you are in contradiction. What do you think?

Thank you,

Paolo

P.S. Ted, would you please check the grammar and the punctuation of the above message? I'm afraid I have made many mistakes in what I have written above. Thanks, Paolo.

Answer
Dear Paolo:

Dear Ted:

I'm sorry to get back to you with the same subject but I'm confused by your
reply.

You wrote the following:

"Strip OFF" can be used, but it really sounds weird.  The other two expressions
mean the same thing.

Then you gave these examples:

The burlesque dancer STRIPPED off her clothing, one piece at a time.

Jane is going to STRIP OFF/STRIP FROM her business suit and put on more casual
clothing.

My question is this:

Why did you write that "strip off" sounds weird but you give/gave two examples
of its use/usage? It seems to me that you are in contradiction. What do you
think?

**** I should have explained further, although I did mention in my answer that "stripping" most often in reference to people who remove their clothing for money.  A "stripper," in this country, is a man or woman who performs [dances] naked in public.  They are paid very well for
showing their nudity and allowing parts of their bodies to be "touched."  Most "strip clubs" are for female dancing, but there are a number of male strippers, as well.  There is a fairly recent movies about male strippers, "Magic Mike."

I think it sounds weird to use a word, "strip," to apply to a businesswoman changing her clothes.

That being said, you CAN use "strip" to describe what the businesswoman does.  I would NOT, because of the association I have with the word "strip."

Thank you,

Paolo

P.S. Ted, would you please check the grammar and the punctuation of the above
message? I'm afraid I have made many mistakes in what I have written above.
Thanks, Paolo.

*** You have made NO errors.

Ted

General Writing and Grammar Help

All Answers


Answers by Expert:


Ask Experts

Volunteer


Ted Nesbitt

Expertise

I am the bibliographic instruction and reference librarian at a public college. Some members of the English department recommend me to their students. I offer assistance in grammar, punctuation, sentence structure, and paragraph development. My master`s thesis concerns William Faulkner`s tragic novels. I formerly taught advanced placement English at two schools in the Philadelphia area.

Experience

I have been one of the highest-ranked volunteers in this category for more than a decade.

Education/Credentials
B. A. and M. A in English; MSIS in Library & Information Sciences; graduate study in philosophy

©2016 About.com. All rights reserved.