General Writing and Grammar Help/He has a "crisp mind"

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Question
Dear Ted,
I'm not sure if you can say that someone has a "crisp mind". In other words, do the following sentences make sense?
1. He has a crisp mind.
2. He has a sharp and crisp mind.

Answer
Dear Glen:

I'm not sure if you can say that someone has a "crisp mind". In other words, do
the following sentences make sense?
1. He has a crisp mind.
2. He has a sharp and crisp mind.

*** I have rarely heard "crisp" used to describe "mind."  Celery and lettuce and carrots are crisp.

That being said, there is no reason that you cannot refer to a "crisp mind."  "Crisp" means "sharp" and "alert."

EXAMPLE:  Although his mind was foggy and confused last evening, this morning he appears to be thinking with a crisp mind.

I also found a company called "Crisp-Mind Software."  Here is one sentence from a 1912 book advising teachers how to prepare for class:  Fresh, crisp clothing helps toward a fresh, crisp mind. [Author = Florence Milner].

So, yes, you can refer to someone's crisp mind.  And . . .  once again, I have learned something, thanks to your question.

Ted  

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Ted Nesbitt

Expertise

I am the bibliographic instruction and reference librarian at a public college. Some members of the English department recommend me to their students. I offer assistance in grammar, punctuation, sentence structure, and paragraph development. My master`s thesis concerns William Faulkner`s tragic novels. I formerly taught advanced placement English at two schools in the Philadelphia area.

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I have been one of the highest-ranked volunteers in this category for more than a decade.

Education/Credentials
B. A. and M. A in English; MSIS in Library & Information Sciences; graduate study in philosophy

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