General Writing and Grammar Help/I would like to......

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Question
Dear Ted:

Are the following introductory clauses correct and natural?

1) I would like to draw your attention on the point that.....

2) I would like to draw your attention to the fact that.....

3) I would like to turn your attention to the fact that.....

If all three are possible, do they have the same meaning?

If not, when should I use each of them?

Would you please give me some examples?

Also, is it correct to call them "introductory clauses"?

And can you give me some alternatives to them, please?

Many, many thanks for your kind help.

Paolo

Answer
Dear Paolo:

Are the following introductory clauses correct and natural?

1) I would like to draw your attention on the point that.....

NO -- It should be "TO the point."

2) I would like to draw your attention to the fact that.....

*** YES

3) I would like to turn your attention to the fact that.....


*** YES

If all three are possible, do they have the same meaning?

If not, when should I use each of them?

Would you please give me some examples?

Also, is it correct to call them "introductory clauses"?

And can you give me some alternatives to them, please?

*** Paolo, they are not "introductory clauses," except in the sense that they come at the beginning of a sentence.  Introductory clauses are almost always ADVERBIAL in nature and they MUST be dependent clauses.  In all of your examples, the clauses you have given are the MAIN clauses in the sentence and they are INDEPENDENT.  The DEPENDENT clauses are what follows the word "THAT."

For example, let's take the second sentence:

2) I would like to draw your attention to the fact that.....

Here is one complete version of the sentence:

I would like to draw your attention to the fact that the ebola virus can easily make geographical migrations.

Here is the parsing of the sentence --

I = subject
would like = verb
to draw your attention = infinitive phrase
to the fact = prepositional phrase

THAT = relative pronoun, connecting the dependent clause that follows it to the noun "fact" which immediately precedes it

Now we move on to the dependent clause, which is an adjective clause, modifying the noun "fact"

ebola = adjective
virus = subject
can make = verb
easily = adverb
geographical = adjective
migrations = noun, used as the direct object of "can make"

Here is an example of an introductory [adverbial] clause:

BECAUSE IT IS SPREAD SO EASILY, the ebola virus is not restrained to any geographical setting.

I hope this helps.

Ted  

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Ted Nesbitt

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I am the bibliographic instruction and reference librarian at a public college. Some members of the English department recommend me to their students. I offer assistance in grammar, punctuation, sentence structure, and paragraph development. My master`s thesis concerns William Faulkner`s tragic novels. I formerly taught advanced placement English at two schools in the Philadelphia area.

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I have been one of the highest-ranked volunteers in this category for more than a decade.

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B. A. and M. A in English; MSIS in Library & Information Sciences; graduate study in philosophy

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