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General Writing and Grammar Help/Question: Are these sentences incorrect?

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Question
Hi Ted,

How are you? I hope that you are fine. I am very delighted that you welcomed me to ask questions. Thanks a lot, Ted. My question is :-

Are these sentences correct?

1) Jane suggested to go to the theater.

2) I don't like tea, too.

3) Tom suggested that Marry go to university.

4) According to me, Jack is not very clever.

5) Would you rather I did it?

6) My mother who is a librarian works a lot.

7) Would you mind to tell me your name, please?


Thanks.

Answer
Dear Den:

How are you? I hope that you are fine. I am very delighted that you welcomed me to ask questions.

*** I am happy that you have contacted me.  It is good to hear from you once again.

Thanks a lot, Ted. My question is :-

Are these sentences correct?

1) Jane suggested to go to the theater.

*** #1 needs a direct object for the verb "suggested."  Suggested WHAT?  There are two very easy ways to correct the sentence.  [Actually, there are MANY ways, but I am giving you the BEST ones.]

**** Jane suggested GOING to the theater. In this version, you replace the infinitive "to go" with the gerund "going."  A gerund is any verb to which "-ing" is added.  GO = GOING.  Gerunds serve as nouns, so "going" is the direct object [either a noun or a pronoun].

You can make the final part of your sentence into a NOUN CLAUSE, which will also serve as the object of the verb "suggested."  Jane suggested THAT WE GO TO THE THEATER."  The noun clause, beginning with "that," tells WHAT Jane suggested.  Thus, the noun clause is a direct object of "suggested."

2) I don't like tea, too.

*** #2 is correct, but it sounds strange or awkward.  Here is a more acceptable version:  I don't like tea, EITHER.

3) Tom suggested that Marry go to university.

*** In American English we would put an article, such as "a" or "the," before university.  The British, however, do NOT.  From the standpoint of a British person, your sentence is correct.

4) According to me, Jack is not very clever.

VERY GOOD

5) Would you rather I did it?

ANOTHER GOOD ONE

6) My mother who is a librarian works a lot.

*** The adjective clause "who is a librarian" is called a non-essential element, which means that it is not necessary to understand the sentence.  The important idea of your sentence is NOT that your mother is a librarian; what is important is that she works a lot.  To show the reader that the clause is NOT essential, enclose "who is a librarian" between commas.

ANOTHER EXAMPLE:  Den, who has blond hair, lives in Pakistan.  "Den lives in Pakistan" is the main clause and the most important idea expressed in the sentence.  The color of Den's hair is simply additional, but not necessary, information.


7) Would you mind to tell me your name, please?

*** In this sentence, just as in the first sentence, the use of the infinitive "to tell" is not good.  Add the "-ing" to "tell" and you will have a "verbal."  This particular verbal, as in the first sentence, is a gerund.  

Would you mind TELLING me your name, please?

****I hope I have been clear in my answers.  If not, please send me another message for clarification.  Do NOT sent follow-up messages, because they become confusing.

Thank you.

Ted  

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Ted Nesbitt

Expertise

I am the bibliographic instruction and reference librarian at a public college. Some members of the English department recommend me to their students. I offer assistance in grammar, punctuation, sentence structure, and paragraph development. My master`s thesis concerns William Faulkner`s tragic novels. I formerly taught advanced placement English at two schools in the Philadelphia area.

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I have been one of the highest-ranked volunteers in this category for more than a decade.

Education/Credentials
B. A. and M. A in English; MSIS in Library & Information Sciences; graduate study in philosophy

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