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General Writing and Grammar Help/Forget, forget about, forget of

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Question
Dear Ted:

Are there any differences among "to forget someone or something," "to forget OF someone or something," and "to forget ABOUT someone or something"?

If so, when should I use each of them?

Would you please give me some examples?

Paolo


P.S. Ted, how are you doing?

Answer
Dear Paolo:

First, I continue with my eye injections each month.  Frankly, I do not see any improvement.  Second, are YOU all right?  I have not heard from you for such a long time.  I thought about
writing or posting on Facebook a message about your health, but I didn't want to be viewed as
prying or nosy.

***********

Are there any differences among "to forget someone or something," "to forget OF someone or something," and "to forget ABOUT someone or something"?

If so, when should I use each of them?

Would you please give me some examples?

TO FORGET SOMEONE OR SOMETHING:

Of your examples, this one, in my opinion, is the best, because it is the most direct.  In the structure of the sentence, "to forget" is an infinitive and the noun or pronoun you name is the object of the infinitive.  That is, what we say, "to the point."

EXAMPLES:  

When I made up the invitation list, I purposefully meant TO FORGET Silvio Berlusconi.

Joan always seems TO FORGET important things, like her house or car keys.

TO FORGET OF SOMEONE OR SOMETHING:

Paolo, I cannot think of ANY instance in which I would use this phrase.  If you can think of an example, please send it to me.

TO FORGET ABOUT SOMEONE OR SOMETHING:

There are many instances in which this phrasing can be interchanged with the first of your examples.  The addition of the preposition "about" simply adds one word and then comes the object of the preposition.  [In the first example, you had the "object of the infinitive."  So, you are slightly changing the sentence structure.]

EXAMPLES:

I tend TO FORGET ABOUT sending birthday cards; consequently, my birthday greetings to other are always "belated."

Jack has tried, with no success,  TO FORGET ABOUT the embarrassing time when he ripped his pants in public.

Ted  

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Ted Nesbitt

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I am the bibliographic instruction and reference librarian at a public college. Some members of the English department recommend me to their students. I offer assistance in grammar, punctuation, sentence structure, and paragraph development. My master`s thesis concerns William Faulkner`s tragic novels. I formerly taught advanced placement English at two schools in the Philadelphia area.

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I have been one of the highest-ranked volunteers in this category for more than a decade.

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B. A. and M. A in English; MSIS in Library & Information Sciences; graduate study in philosophy

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