General Writing and Grammar Help/Strip off, strip out of

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Question
Dear Ted:

Do the following phrases "to strip out of one's clothes" and "to strip off (of) one's clothes" make sense in English?

If so, when are they used and do they mean the same thing?

Also, would you please give me some examples of how to use them correctly?

Many, many thanks for your kind help.

Paolo

Answer
Dear Paolo:

Do the following phrases "to strip out of one's clothes" and "to strip off (of) one's clothes" make sense in English?

If so, when are they used and do they mean the same thing?

*** They are used often, and they mean the same thing.  I would guess that "strip off" is used more frequently.  Sometimes, just the word "strip" is used:  I want you to go into the examination room and strip.

Also, would you please give me some examples of how to use them correctly?

EXAMPLES:

Stripping out of one's clothing is the primary feature of burlesque shows.

The boys went into the locker room to strip off their uniforms.

The man who stripped out of his clothes in the park was arrested for public exposure.

There is a practice unique to soccer games:  The winning team strips off their shirts.

*** Paolo, you can interchange the two phrases in my examples.

Ted

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Ted Nesbitt

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I am the bibliographic instruction and reference librarian at a public college. Some members of the English department recommend me to their students. I offer assistance in grammar, punctuation, sentence structure, and paragraph development. My master`s thesis concerns William Faulkner`s tragic novels. I formerly taught advanced placement English at two schools in the Philadelphia area.

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I have been one of the highest-ranked volunteers in this category for more than a decade.

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B. A. and M. A in English; MSIS in Library & Information Sciences; graduate study in philosophy

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