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Genetics/Are amoeba immortal?

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Question
Hi
I'm not sure if this is the right place to ask this question,if its not, kindly direct me to the right one

Are amoeba and other organisms which multiply by cell division "immortal", as an amoeba divides into two to reproduce and thus there is no 'dead body' to speak of.

I know this question is a bit naive, but i wanted to ask it any way.

Thanks.

Answer
Pranav,

You r technically correct in considering amoeba as "immortal". It applies to even other organisms lower on the evolutionary scale (in terms of organ systems classified by humans)- organisms which regenerate.
In case of Amoeba, there is indeed no deadbody and the "mom" divides into two daughter cells. Biologically, these are two entities which are clones of the mother - who now ceases to exist. So it could pass for a philosophical question beyond a point.
Thane

Genetics

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Thanemozhi Natarajan

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Answers in Genetics, genomics, cytogenetics of syndromes, congenital anomalies, cancer, clinical genomics and interpretation of omics data.

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More than 10 years. Doctoral research thesis on Congenital anomalies and cytogenetics, Recurrent reproductive failure and chromosomal abnormalities. Postdoctoral experience in Breast cancer research. Current: Clinical Genomics and Pharmacogenomics.

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Academic

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Cancer Cell International, Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, Breast cancer research and treatment, Indian Journal of Pediatrics, BMC Proceedings, Pharmacogenetics and Genomics, Human Molecular Genetics, Frontiers in Genetics, Cancer Biomarkers.

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PhD Biomedical Genetics

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University Grants Commission Award for pursuing PhD level research (India); Travel awards to attend conferences.

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Post doctoral experience Cancer research, molecular epidemiology Current: Clininical Genomics and Pharmacogenomics

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