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Genetics/genetic blood types

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blondie wrote at 2014-03-14 07:54:43
This answer is only partially correct.  In simplified terms, if one parent is a Bombay (hh) that parent is incapable of expressing the A or B antigen, so phenotypically they appear to be group O.  However, they can pass their A or B "antigen" to their offspring.  Therefore, assuming the offspring receives the H "antigen" from the other parent who is blood group O (expressed as OO) that offspring will express the A or B "antigen" (expressed as AO or BO).  Hence, two parents who appear to be blood group O can have a child with blood group A or B.


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I am able to answer questions regarding human medical genetics, mouse genetic studies, molecular biology, biochemistry, and cell biology. I am also able to answer questions concerning prenatal and postnatal genetic testing but am ethically unable to give advice on such test results.

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I have 10 years experience in human genetics, including clinical, population, and molecular genetics. I am currently an active researcher in molecular and developmental genetics at Virginia Commonwealth University/ Medical College of Virginia. I have previously taught genetics and cell biology at the college level.

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American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) American Society of Human Genetics

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B.S., Biochemistry, University of Southern Mississippi
M.S., Human Genetics, Louisiana State University Medical Center
Ph.D., Genetics and Vision Science, University of Alabama at Birmingham

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