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Earthquake Resistant Proof Structure
Earthquake Resistant P  
Dear Keith

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earthquake
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earthquake_resistant_structures‎
http://www.agiweb.org/education/aapg/invest/invest13.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seismology
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seismometer
http://www.iris.edu/hq/files/publications/brochures_onepagers/doc/OnePager7.pdf
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=URC7zHeypWw‎
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-N_Q6Q-3o7M‎
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9X-js9gXSME
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tq9_UAcKq3M‎
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-pacific-15033972‎
http://www.buffalo.edu/news/10380‎
http://www.strongtie.com/about/research/capstone.html
http://www.sciencedaily.com/videos/2007/0112-earthquake_test_building_better_hom
http://www.nkanzai.co.jp/en/building/best/diagnosis2.html
http://www.geo.mtu.edu/UPSeis/waves.html‎
http://www.reidsteel.com/information/earthquake_resistant_building.htm
http://www.iris.edu/hq/files/programs/education_and_outreach/retm/tm_100112_hait

Is it possible to build 100 % Earthquake resistant proof buildings and structures ?.

Awaiting your reply,

Thanks & Regards,
Prashant S Akerkar

Answer
I imagine if you tailor it to the specific area in which you are building that it might be possible.  You need to take into account all types of motion that it might be subjected to.

Whereas most buildings are built to withstand compressional forces and are designed to support the load of its own weight, a quake resistant building must also withstand lateral motion, as well as the stresses of lateral moment forces, or shaking forces.

Then you have the rare but still possible differential vertical movement like what might occur if the fault runs right under the structure and in the event of a quake, there is considerable differential lateral vertical displacement.

There is also the possibility of transverse lateral displacement or shearing along the fault that offsets the structure on either side of the fault by a considerable distance.
Now it is unlikely that anyone would be so foolish to build a struture on etiher side of a fault, it could happen.  In both the last two cases, I doubt any structure would survive.

Springs and increased lateral strength would make a building survivable in the first two cases, and have.  But shearing in both the vertical or lateral-horizontal direction would be very difficult to overcome.

In most cases study of the types of quakes prevelent in an area is know from historical records and building designs are tailored for that.

For instance, quake damage in the Marina district of San Francisco is caused by the jello like movement of the saturated fill sediments along the bay, whereas the hills of the city being solid bedrock exposes the structures to different stresses.  

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Keith Patton

Expertise

I can answer questions concerning physical and historical geology, environmental geology/hydrology, environmental consulting, remote sensing/aerial photo interpretation, G&G computer applications, petroleum exploration, drilling, geochemistry, geochemical and microbiological prospecting, 3D reservoir modeling, computer mapping and drilling.I am not a geophysicist.

Experience

I have 24 years experience split between the petroleum and environmental industries. I have served as an expert witness in remote sensing, developmental geologist, exploration geologist, enviromental project manager, and subject matter expert in geology and geophysical software development.

Organizations
American Association of Petroleum Geologists
American Association of Photogrammetrists and Remote Sensing

Education/Credentials
Bachelor and Master of Science
Registered Geologist in State of Texas

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