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What type of rock is this it is a very dark green, and is it worth anything

It is very difficult to identify most rocks simply by pictures but my first guess would be pyroxene.  Within hand specimens, pyroxene can generally be identified by the following characteristics: two directions of cleavage intersecting at roughly right angles (approximately 87 and 93), stubby prismatic crystal habit with nearly square cross sections perpendicular to cleavage directions, and a Mohs hardness between 5 and 7. (a knife blade is 5.5 therefore if you can scratch the mineral with a knife blade it is less than 5.5; however, I would suspect that this specimen is probably harder than 5.5) Specific gravity values of the pyroxenes range from about 3.0 to 4.0. Unlike amphiboles, pyroxenes do not yield water when heated in a closed tube. Characteristically, pyroxenes are dark green to black in colour, but they can range from dark green to apple-green and from lilac to colourless, depending on the chemical composition. Diopside ranges from white to light green, darkening in colour as the iron content increases. Hedenbergite and augite are typically black. Pigeonite is greenish brown to black. Jadeite (see photograph) is white to apple-green to emerald-green or mottled white and green. Aegirine (acmite) forms long, slender prismatic crystals that are brown to green in colour. Enstatite is yellowish or greenish brown and sometimes has a submetallic bronzelike lustre. Iron-rich ferrosilite.

The pyroxenes are a group of important rock-forming inosilicate minerals found in many igneous and metamorphic rocks. They share a common structure consisting of single chains of silica tetrahedra and they crystallize in the monoclinic and orthorhombic systems. Pyroxenes have the general formula XY(Si,Al)2O6 (where X represents calcium, sodium, iron+2 and magnesium and more rarely zinc, manganese and lithium and Y represents ions of smaller size, such as chromium, aluminium, iron+3, magnesium, manganese, scandium, titanium, vanadium and even iron+2). Although aluminium substitutes extensively for silicon in silicates such as feldspars and amphiboles, the substitution occurs only to a limited extent in most pyroxenes.

The name pyroxene comes from the Greek words for fire (πυρ) and stranger (ξένος). Pyroxenes were named this way because of their presence in volcanic lavas, where they are sometimes seen as crystals embedded in volcanic glass; it was assumed they were impurities in the glass, hence the name "fire strangers". However, they are simply early-forming minerals that crystallized before the lava erupted.

Mantle-peridotite xenolith from San Carlos Indian Reservation, Gila Co., Arizona, USA. The xenolith is dominated by green peridot olivine, together with black orthopyroxene and spinel crystals, and rare grass-green diopside grains.

The upper mantle of Earth is composed mainly of olivine and pyroxene. A piece of the mantle is shown at right (orthopyroxene is black, diopside (containing chromium) is bright green, and olivine is yellow-green) and is dominated by olivine, typical for common peridotite. Pyroxene and feldspar are the major minerals in basalt and gabbro.

The rock is unique and may be worth a few dollars to a collector; although, it has not mineral value.


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Joe Norris


I am an economic geologist. An economic geologist does mineral evaluations and appraisals of mineral or mining properties. I can tell you if your deposit has value - remember that a mineral deposit, no matter how good, only has value when mined. Any value assigned to a mineral deposit, in the ground, is only the speculative value that deposit.


I have been a economic geologist for most of my 35 year career. Although I have done work in perhaps 45 states and numerious countries much of my work has been in Appalachian coal, intermountain west gold and silver, and Arizona uranium.

Past President of the Virginia Section of the American Institute of Professional Geologists and a certified geologist in twelve states.

BS Degree from Eastern Kentucky University. Work on MS Degree @ Eastern Kentucky University, Colorad School of Mines & Marshall University Numerious short courses on the value of mineral deposits and how to value same. Also several short courses dealing with the different types of geologic processes; sedimentary, igneous, metamorphic along with the mineral associated with each.

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