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Coordinate Geometry.
Coordinate Geometry.  
Dear Prof Azeem

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Analytic_geometry
http://www.mathopenref.com/coordintro.html
http://www.math.com/school/subject3/lessons/S3U1L2GL.html
http://c-schools.net/PPT/Coordinate%20Geometry.ppt
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7h74ad7IWiI
http://www.math.wisc.edu/~robbin/461dir/coordinateGeometry.pdf
http://www.wolframalpha.com/examples/CoordinateGeometry.html

What could be the Impact to different disciplines and applications
of mathematics if Point (x,y) is replaced with Point (y,x).

i.e. x coordinate = Horizontal axis
    y coordinate = Vertical axis


Now instead of this standard convention, implement the following
given below

i.e. x coordinate = Vertical axis
    y coordinate = Horizontal axis


For examples :  

1st Quadrant Point A(3,2) will become Point A(2,3)
2nd Quadrant Point B(-2,3) will become Point B(3,-2)
3rd Quadrant Point C(-3,-4) will become Point C(-4,-3)
4th Quadrant Point D(2,-3) will become Point D(-3,2)

i.e. because the Points are now represented as y,x instead of x,y,
the Plotting of Points A,B,C,D on graph paper will be now different.

Can there be any impact while plotting Graphs viz Sine,Cosine, Tangent waves etc, vector algebra and other applications of mathematics similar to Coordinate Geometry if Point F (x,y) is represented as Point F(y,x) ?

Awaiting your reply,

Thanks & Regards,
Prashant S Akerkar

Answer
Hi Prashant,

Mapping a point (x,y) to (y,x) is equivalent to reflecting the point about the line y=x and is also equivalent to rotating the point 90 degrees about the origin.  If you're interested in transformations in the plane, then mapping (x,y) to (y,x) will be of use to you.

Consider now a function in the plane, y=f(x).  If you swap x and y, evidently you will still get the same transformations listed above.  However, what you will obtain is the inverse of the function f.  For instance, if you graph y=tan(x) then switch all the x's and y's, you will obtain the graph of arctan(x).  (Restrictions on the domain and range will be necessary for most functions.)

Regards,
Azeem

Geometry

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Azeem Hussain

Expertise

I welcome your questions on algebra, 2D and 3D geometry, parabolic functions and conic sections, and any other mathematical queries you may have.

Experience

4 years as a drop-in and by-appointment tutor at Champlain College. Private tutor for dozens of clients over the past 8 years.

Publications
CALPHAD: Computer Coupling of Phase Diagrams and Thermochemistry

Education/Credentials
Bachelor of Science, Major Mathematics and Major Economics, McGill University, 2014. Diploma of Collegiate Studies; Pure and Applied Science, Champlain College Saint-Lambert, 2010.

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