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Geometry/Concept of Percentage

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Question
Hello sir


Can you explain me the concept of %.

Sir for me it is confusing that percent meaning is per 100 but some examples are confusing that for eg 8% of 250 here according to the defination of percent that is per hundred. means here 8 is per hundred then what is 250 please explain me the concept of percentage.

please please pleasse

thanks

Answer
Hi Shilpa,

You can view a percentage as a way to compare fractions.  Suppose you wrote two exams and scored 25/30 one one of them, and 66/75 on the other.  It is not clear which one you scored better on.  However, by converting the scores into percentages, they can be directly compared.
It can also go the other way.  If the passing grade is 60%, what score out of 30 would you need?  What score out of 75 would you need?

Returning to your example.  You actually have stated it quite clearly in your question:
"means here 8 is per hundred then what is 250"

8/100 = n/250, where you need to solve for n.

In general we have a percentage number (x) a small number (n) and a big number (N).  The equation you will set up is the following:

x/100 = n/N

Depending on the formulation of the question, the unknown could be x, n, or N.  (Note that we could have n > N, in which case x > 100).  No matter the case, you can always use the above equation as the starting point for a percentage calculation.

Thanks for asking,
Azeem

Geometry

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Azeem Hussain

Expertise

I welcome your questions on algebra, 2D and 3D geometry, parabolic functions and conic sections, and any other mathematical queries you may have.

Experience

4 years as a drop-in and by-appointment tutor at Champlain College. Private tutor for dozens of clients over the past 8 years.

Publications
CALPHAD: Computer Coupling of Phase Diagrams and Thermochemistry

Education/Credentials
Bachelor of Science, Major Mathematics and Major Economics, McGill University, 2014. Diploma of Collegiate Studies; Pure and Applied Science, Champlain College Saint-Lambert, 2010.

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