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Goats/problems with banding on pygmy buck

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QUESTION: Hi Donna,

I wrote to you 2 months ago about my little man, Sam, after his mama died.  Your help was invaluable and I can't thank you enough.  He has been thriving.  We banded him at 4 weeks and he is just now 8 weeks old and hasn't appeared to be having any problems.  We have kept a check on the banded area and the scrotal sac shrank and hardened and just this week looked like it was starting to pull away.  Today we noticed that Sam was not moving quite as quickly and seemed a little less playful.  Still eating well, peeing and pooping without problems.  I checked his scrotal area and the band and it looks like it has separated more and has been bleeding some.  I cleaned the area up and it's not actively bleeding but looks to be oozing.  What concerns me more than that is that it doesn't look like everything has completely separated.  Like the sac is dry and hard but internally, what the sac was attached to is still attached and not dried up as I thought it was supposed to if this makes any sense.  I put a styptic salve on it to stop the bleeding but not sure of what I am seeing.  I would have taken a picture but he was objecting mightily to me messing with it and being held in place to look at it.  

Thank you, Susan

ANSWER: Hi there - it sounds like it might be infected - this does not happen very often but it does occur.  Would start him on injectable antibiotics - penicillin is my choice, probably 1/2 cc twice a day for 3 to 5 days.  Also would need probiotics during this time. Would also start on human aspirin at 1/4 of a 325 mg aspirin twice a day to help with inflammation and pain.  Would use something like NFZ puffer if you have it - this is an antibiotic powder that is puffed onto wounds - twice a day for 3 days.  Sounds like from the bleeding that indeed the dried testicle is trying to come off but with an infection there it makes it more difficult.  Hope this helps - Donna

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QUESTION: Thank you.  I will get right on that first thing tomorrow morning.  It's funny, I was just looking at a bottle of the Penicillin at Tractor Supply the other day, should've gone on and got it.  

One other question.  I have read differing opinions on when a Pygmy goat should be weaned.  Some articles say by 6-8 weeks and some say 3-5 months.  Sam is down to two 18 oz bottles per day and the rest of the time he is out with his older sister grazing.  I haven't really introduced him to any grain, at least not very much, he is eating mostly orchard hay and whatever he sees Izzy munching on.  When should he definitely be weaned from the bottle and when and how much grain?  

Thank you again!
Susan

Answer
Sounds like he is eating well.  You can wean him at any time after 8 weeks - I generally keep them on a bottle until at least 3 months.  Also, I like to start them on calf manna at 6 to 8 weeks so once you start weaning them the vitamins in the calf manna will keep them growing nicely.  The calf manna is at most feed stores - I think they have small bags of it as you only give a small amount - starting at one tablespoon once a day and then work up to twice a day and then for a pygmy goat probably 1/2 cup once or twice a day at most when they are off the bottle.  Hope this helps - Donna

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Donna Ruelas-Semasko/Edelweiss Acres

Expertise

All goat health care, nutrition, judging questions about all goats - packgoats, dairy goats, pygmy goats, meat goats, fleece goats.

Experience

27 years health care/nutrition of all types of goats, 17 years experience in packgoats, 20 years experience in 4H goat projects as leader, superintendent and judge. 20 years experience in putting on goat care/nutrition seminars.

Organizations
NAPgA, The Evergreen Packgoat Club, 4H, ADGA.

Publications
Hobby Farm, many newspapers, 4H newsletters, Packgoat Manuals (youth and general), judging information pamphlets, seminar handouts about health care and nutrition.

Education/Credentials
4 years of college, ongoing education in goats.

Awards and Honors
Small Farm Award of Thurston County

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