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I have a buck. He is just over a year old and is in great shape. His temp is normal, behavior is normal, activity is normal. He seems to be fine in all categories except his legs. He has a rash, or parasite or fungus????? on all four and on his testicles. Its almost like he is allergic to his bedding, or that there is a parasite eating at his legs. It isn't oozing,it is dry and flaky and he has scratched so much his hair is very patchy and his skin is raw. :-( I am a new gaot owner, I have six Boers and I LOVE them. The buck shares a pen with my other buck and he hasn't been affected by whatever this is. Which leads me to think allergy....but, I haven't experienced this sort of thing before and, like i said, I'm new to this. Do you have any idea what it may be? Or what I can put on it to help him?
Its been a LONG, cold winter and he has been bedding on hay....a lot of hay. It only is affecting him on the parts that are down when he is bedding.....I hope I've been specific enough to give you an idea. Your advice would be greatly appreciated.
Thank you so much,
God Bless you,
Terri Duncan

Answer
HI Teri:
Forgive my tardiness - there was some sort of glitch where I never received a notice of  question pending here at AllExperts until now

Mites do live in straw so it could be mites. Or lice or weather related.
To  rule out external parasites, I use a product called Ivermectin POUR ON found at local feed stores.
It is actually used as a dewormer and delouser for cattle, but in goats is not effective as a dewormer  but is good for external parasites. On my website I have a page devoted to Ivomec (the brand name) Pour on although now it does come in other brands- the  actual generic name is
Ivermectin Pour-On and may come as an other brand, look at the ingredients - and make sure it says (ivermectin) on it and that it IS the pour on..  do not use this orally , use it topically as in the article  -
http://goat-link.com/content/view/180/168

If this does not solve the issue, a vet skin scraping would be in order  to see what other dermatological issue it may be. Skin disorders are some of the most  difficult to diagnose without a skin scraping. But I would start  with seeing if external parasites may be the issue.  

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Goatlady

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Specializing in New Goat Owner understanding of goat physiology, goat anatomy, goat care and herd management. *I am not a veterinarian, any advice and information should be verified by your veterinarian before administering to your goats. (! During times of severe weather in the Midwest, I may experience a delay in internet service due to the interference of the satellite reception - but will answer your questions as soon as service is restored. !) Note: Keep in mind, the goat expert is volunteering her time to help other goat owners, she also runs her farm with her own herd of 100 goats and may not be at her computer at all hours. Questions are answered as soon as she can possibly read and answer them, usually within 24 hours.

Experience

23 years experience of raising goats and herd management. Active hands on experience with goat herd and research with various Caprine University Research and Extension Centers nationwide. 15 years dedicated to helping other goat breeders/owners with goat anatomy, goat disease and goat health care issues via phone, published goat care articles and internet interaction. The information I have to offer is not only from personal experience and years of research updated often as new information is made available to me, but supported by many Veterinary Research colleges and all medications and information I have to offer on how the medications work and what dosages "I" use, is information I have acquired by discussing directly with the company's veterinarians and staff research experts.

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12 year active member of International Veterinary Information Service

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United Caprine News, Homesteaders Magazine, Columnist for Goat Magazine, Owner and Author of GoatPedia™

Education/Credentials
Graduate Programs in Medicine, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University

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