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Goats/Di-metox and pregnant goats

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Question
Hi goatlady, i recently bought 8 kids at a local auction and im pretty sure one or two of them have coccidiosis. We have been treating all them with Di-metox twice a day as the instructions tell us, and herbal dewormer for almost a week now. Today i noticed that two of my pregnant goats had pudding like stools and my first thought was that they have Coccidiosis since we havent been treating them with Di-metox like we have been with all of my other goats since they are pregnant and we weren't sure if we could. They have been eating and drinking water and walking aroud as they normaly do to my knowledge. My question is can i give them Di-metox even tho there pregnant and going to kid any day now? or should i wait a couple more days to see if it goes away? Thank you for any answers you can give me.

-Ellie

Answer
HI Ellie,
Forgive me.. I somehow did not see this question until now.

Coccidiosis  does not just go away.. here is my article on the subject..  http://goat-link.com/content/view/145/155/

BUT if it were me.. I'd ditch the herbal dewormer and use a dewormer  that will be far more effective..  as this too can cause these symptoms.. Please also read these articles that will  help you understand in detail..

Deworming goats:  http://goat-link.com/content/view/58/46/
Scours: http://goat-link.com/content/view/50/92/
Liver Fluke:  http://goat-link.com/content/view/152/171/1/1/

Coccidiosis  has a definite odor that once you ever smell it , you probably will never forget it.

Corid  used for cocci is not safe for pregnant does in the first 60 days of pregnancy - the sulfa meds how ever are safe.


This also is an excellent article on cocci : http://www.tennesseemeatgoats.com/articles2/coccidiosis06.html

I think I would opt to treat  as soon as possible.. even before kidding..  

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Goatlady

Expertise

Specializing in New Goat Owner understanding of goat physiology, goat anatomy, goat care and herd management. *I am not a veterinarian, any advice and information should be verified by your veterinarian before administering to your goats. (! During times of severe weather in the Midwest, I may experience a delay in internet service due to the interference of the satellite reception - but will answer your questions as soon as service is restored. !) Note: Keep in mind, the goat expert is volunteering her time to help other goat owners, she also runs her farm with her own herd of 100 goats and may not be at her computer at all hours. Questions are answered as soon as she can possibly read and answer them, usually within 24 hours.

Experience

23 years experience of raising goats and herd management. Active hands on experience with goat herd and research with various Caprine University Research and Extension Centers nationwide. 15 years dedicated to helping other goat breeders/owners with goat anatomy, goat disease and goat health care issues via phone, published goat care articles and internet interaction. The information I have to offer is not only from personal experience and years of research updated often as new information is made available to me, but supported by many Veterinary Research colleges and all medications and information I have to offer on how the medications work and what dosages "I" use, is information I have acquired by discussing directly with the company's veterinarians and staff research experts.

Organizations
12 year active member of International Veterinary Information Service

Publications
United Caprine News, Homesteaders Magazine, Columnist for Goat Magazine, Owner and Author of GoatPedia™

Education/Credentials
Graduate Programs in Medicine, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University

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