Greek/greek

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Question
QUESTION: Hi!
I am currently studying Greek and Latin. How much does one need to study in order to learn these languages? Will it be tiresome and hard for me?

ANSWER: Hi Hank,

thank you for asking. In order to give an answer to your question I would like to know the following:

-How old are you?
-Why are you studying these two languages, i.e. what is your motivation?
-Are you a beginner or what is your current level of knowledge in Latin and Greek?
-What foreign and native modern (or even ancient) languages do you speak?

For Greek you generally need to work much harder than for Latin. Answer the above questions and I will give you my opinion.

Have a good day.
Michael

---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

QUESTION: -How old are you?
I am 25 years old
-Why are you studying these two languages, i.e. what is your motivation?
I like philosophy, theology and being intelectual
-Are you a beginner or what is your current level of knowledge in Latin and Greek?
I have read some Latin before but this is a beginners course at universuty
-What foreign and native modern (or even ancient) languages do you speak?
I speak Swedish and English is second language

Why is Greek harder?

ANSWER: Hi again Hank,

now I have an overview of your purpose. Learning a language such as Latin and Greek while having a motivation for contextual goals, i.e. to read original thoughts of ancient Greek philosophy etc. isn't really enough for a start. You need to have a kind of talent or at least good bases in understanding linguistic complexities and an extensive vocabulary.

If your will is strong, you will learn easily. But be sure that it takes great effort to reach a language level in order to read philosophy. In your case it would be good to start with translated textes. Of course, it helps when you learn grammar; if you reach a level at which you will need a dictionary in order to look up some words, then it's a really good achievement. But it will take several years, e.g. 2-3 years at least for each language.

Greek is a bit more difficult because there are more things to learn in grammar, more irregular stuff, more words and three times more the volume of the Latin literature. I suggest you start from Greek or Latin of the theological period, i.e. from the Koine Greek and ecclesiastical Latin. After you reach the basics, then you can go back to the past philosophers and older language which is more condensed and perplexed.

Your knowledge of English will support you in Latin undoubtedly, but for Greek you need a brand new start. Nevertheless, it is worth trying and I wish you good luck. In case there is anything you don't understand, do not hesitate to contact me.

Have a nice day.

Cordially,
Michael

---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

QUESTION: How much do one need to study everyday?

Answer
Well, if you devote two hours for each language daily, I believe it could do the job. I suggest you start with Latin, reach a considerable level and, then, after about 6-8 months - once you have understood the concept - start with Greek. There are great similarities, but also differences, which one should master without confusing the two. I do not know how much time you have or whatelse you are occupied with, but nowadays it takes more time than it used to in the past.

Have a good day and always glad to assist.

Cordially,
Michael

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Michael Barkas

Expertise

I provide assistance in linguistic, literary topics of Greek and Latin covering, thus, the following fields: translation, grammar, syntax, vocabulary, etymology, morphology, semantics and interpretations etc.

Experience

Studies: University of the Aegean, Dept Rhodes Friedrich Wilhelm Universitšt Bonn

Education/Credentials
Magister Artium (Archeology/Linguistics) Bachelor (Latin/English/Greek)

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