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I have a similar question to one already posted. In fact that is how I found you. I assure you my reason for wanting it is quite different though. I would like to know what the phrase translated as 'One word frees us from all the weight and pain of life. That word is love.' is in the original Greek. I do not have any tattoos. It is for a craft project for a wedding gift for my dearest friend. He is a preacher, pianist, and a truly wonderful and dedicated man with an interest in history and languages. I hope I got the quote correct, as it is from memory. Many thanks and have a blessed week.

Answer
Hello,

first of all I have to point out that "One word frees us from all the weight and pain of life. That word is love" is nothing but an adaptation of the original Greek quotation from Sophocles, Oedipus at Colonus, lines 1615-1617, which reads as follows:

“Ἀλλ᾽ ἓν γὰρ μόνον τὰ πάντα λύει ταῦτ᾽ἔπος μοχθήματα. Tὸ γὰρ φιλεῖν…  “.
[literally,"But indeed only one word undoes all these hardships. To love.."]

In this passage the messenger tells of Oedipus’ final moments, when he  bids farewell to his daughters, Antigone and Ismene, and says that only one word, i.e. love, can free them from all the weight and pain of life.

Read more below.

Best regards,

Maria
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P.S.
Note that “Ἀλλ᾽ ἓν γὰρ μόνον  τὰ πάντα λύει ταῦτ᾽ ἔπος μοχθήματα. Tὸ γὰρ φιλεῖν” literally means:” But indeed only one word undoes all these hardships. To love…”, whose English adaptation  sounds as “One word frees us from all the weight and pain of life. That word is love”

Here’s the parsing of the Greek original quotation:

-Ἀλλ᾽ ἓν γὰρ μόνον (agreeing with the neuter noun ἔπος)= But indeed only one

-τὰ πάντα … ταῦτ᾽  μοχθήματα (direct object) = all these hardships

-λύει (verb, 3rd person singular, present indicative)= undoes /frees us

-ἔπος (nominative case,3rd declension,  subject of the verb λύει) = word

-Tὸ γὰρ φιλεῖν ( present infinitive ) = to love

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Maria

Expertise

I'll be glad to answer any questions concerning ANCIENT GREEK. So, do not ask me please questions regarding MODERN GREEK as it is different from Ancient Greek either in spelling/meaning or in pronunciation.

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Over 25 years teaching experience.

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I received my Ph.D in Classics (summa cum laude) from Genova University (Italy) and my thesis was about ancient Greek drama (Aeschylus).

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