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Hair Loss/PRP and Dr Alex



1) Sir what is your view on PRP? I have seen some studies in which patients who were using conventional treatments for AGA i.e minoxidil and finasteride and didn't respond to them, got a good response by having PRP sessions.

2)Sir I have read Dr Alx Khadavi story that at the age of 20 , he suffered AGA and at that time he does not want to use drugs such as Finasteride and minoxidl, and started his research on natural alternatives and it was how Revivogen was created. Sir I am shocked that even now if Dr Khadavi is not using finasteride and minoxidil then how is it possible that he is able to preserve his hair till now  with just daily application of Revivogen?

ANSWER: 1) I do not believe PRP is worth the effort. I am not impressed with the results I have seen thus far. It is possible I will change my mind with more evidence of its benefits to hair growth.

2) Dr Khadavi was a student of mine as dermatology resident at UCSF. I am impressed with what he has done to prevent AGA in his making a shampoo and lotion to counter DHT.  I can not explain what he does to keep his hair. You will have to ask him yourself

---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

QUESTION: Sir can teeth extraction and injecting local anesthesia before the extraction can cause TE?

Not likely.
This answer is from a question two months ago:

QUESTION: Hello Doctor, Can dental surgery cause telogen effluvium?

ANSWER: Yes, if it is stressful enough to your system.

From my book "Hair Loss Answers" Chapter 4-- It can be read for free at:

Stress-- It can be due to any surgical procedure or infection.

Stress can cause a type of hair loss called telogen effluvium. This condition is not caused by the general accumulated stress of ordinary interactions with people at home and at work, but rather by sudden severe emotional or physiological incidents. Severe stressful events can cause some or most actively growing hair follicles to prematurely shift into the regression phase, and then the resting phase, during which the hairs fall out easily.

There is usually a delay of a few weeks to a few months before the shedding is noticeable, but after this delay the shedding seems to occur quite suddenly. Because the shedding is delayed, this type of hair loss is often a mystery to the person suffering the condition. The stressful event that triggered it is frequently forgotten, and it is rarely thought to be connected with the “new problem.”

Examples of sudden severe emotionally stressful events include the death or terminal illness of a family member or close friend, marriage, divorce, and unexpected job loss. Severe physiological stressful events shock the body, and some examples are heart attacks, major surgery, and illnesses with prolonged high fever such as malaria, viral pneumonia, and severe cases of the flu.

In most cases of telogen effluvium, the hair follicles recover and soon shift back to the regular growth cycle.

However, repeated instances of telogen effluvium can result in premature hair loss in people predisposed to lose their hair late in life. The average growth cycle of a hair follicle takes about five years, but each follicle is “genetically programmed” for only a limited number of growth cycles. For example, if a particular hair follicle were “genetically programmed” for only ten growth cycles, after about fifty years that follicle would stop producing new hairs. When all the follicles at the hairline or crown of the head are “genetically programmed” this way, a receding hairline or bald spot appears after all the growth cycles for the follicles in those areas have been cycled through.

Each incidence of telogen effluvium uses up one “life” of the affected hair follicles. So instead of having a receding hairline or bald spot at age fifty, the hair loss may occur a few years earlier. This is not a significant issue if telogen effluvium occurs once or twice in a lifetime; however, accelerated hair loss can result from repeated severe stressful events, if each instance triggers a new round of telogen effluvium.

I had a patient who was totally bald when I met him at age seventy, and he had lost all his hair by age twenty-two. He had worked on the Panama Canal fifty years earlier, and for two straight years starting when he was twenty he suffered repeated bouts of severe fever from episodes of malaria. Each time he suffered from malaria induced fever he experienced telogen effluvium, lost what hair he had, and his hair follicles lost another “life.” After ten or fifteen malaria stress cycles, at the age of twenty-two, he had the hair he would have had at age seventy. Which unfortunately for him was no hair at all.

---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

QUESTION: By dental surgery I mean to say extraction of 3 or 4 teeth because of installation of braces. Can such extraction cause telogen effluvium which in turn can accelerate male pattern baldness in a a person already having male pattern baldness?
Answer:   I'm sure most people who have had that kind of dental surgery did not experience an Telogen Effluvium which accelerated their Male Pattern Baldness- BUT eveyone is different and IF the stress at the time of surgery was adequate enough to stress your body then YES it is possible to get a TE and then an acceleration of male pattern baldness. It depends on a lot of factors. If a general anesthetic was used then just the use of that type of anesthesia could cause a TE. If there was an infection then the fever or the stress of that infection could cause a TE.
Again- It CAN happen- It doesn't happen very often.

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Peter J. Panagotacos, <B>M.D.</B>


I have 30 years experience in the field of medical and surgical Hair Restoration and am Board Certified in Dermatology and Hair Restoration Surgery.


I have 30 years experience in the field of medical and surgical Hair Restoration and am Board Certified in Dermatology and Hair Restoration Surgery. More information can be found at my website

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