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Heating, Air Conditioning, Fridge, HVAC/Wall air condtioner not blowing cool air

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Question
Hi. I live in a third floor apartment and have a ten year old Kenmore (Sears) model 580.73123200 thru the wall air condtioner that is no longer blowing cool air. I noticed that ice forms on the right side of the evaporator (front) coils when the unit is operating. I have already cleaned the evaporator (front) and condensor (back) coils with coil cleaner and spray water and have washed the plastic filter but the ice still forms when the AC is on.

While I was washing the coils, I noticed the container of R22 refridgerant behind the control panel. It did not feel cold to the touch. Shouldn't it feel cold? I also did not see any drain
hole or tube going through the metal case where the condensate supposedly should be expelled. Are wall air conditioners supposed to be built that way or is this just a bad design? If wall
ACs are designed with no drain holes or tubes then how would the condensate be expelled? I know that window air condtioners have drain tubes or holes. I also noticed a build up of rust on the metal pan which leaves me to believe that previously condensate water was building up near the condensor coils. Is there anything else I can try to fix the problem? Of course, my AC would have to fail in the middle of a very hot summer! Any help that you can
offer would be greatly appreciated. Thank You!

Answer
Steve,  

If your indoor and outdoor coils are clean all the way through and your blower motor is turning at the correct speed(s)( RPM ) and your partially frosting at the indoor coil, chances are your low on charge. " The container or R22 behind the control panel" is probably the accumulator. While the unit is running the accumulator should be sweating and cool to the touch. You can try running your blower at a higher speed to get more air across the indoor coil to see if the  frost disappears. Also remove the air filter and see if the frost disappears. But at face value it looks like your losing refrigerant.   As far as having a drain holes some models do not have one ,the outdoor fan blade picks up the water and slings it across the outdoor coil to help lower the refrigerant pressures.

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40+ years diversified experience.An HVAC/Refrigeration Self Employed Contractor since 1986. NATE Certifield. Answer questions pertaining to Residential and Commercial Air Conditioning , Warm Air Heating, Heat Pump systems.Mechanical and Electrical troubleshooting of these systems.Be as detailed as possible when describing problem.Packaged unit or split systems.No appliance questions.

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Installation and Troubleshooting, Mechanical and Electrical, in following areas, Refrigeration ( Walk In and Reach In Coolers and Freezers ) Commercial Roof Top and Packaged Heating/Cooling ( Natural Gas,Propane, Electric, and Heat Pumps ) Computer Room Air Conditoning Systems,Commercial Residential Packaged and Split Systems Air Conditoning and Heat Pumps.Warm Air Oil , Natural and Propane Gas Heating systems.

Education/Credentials
Graduated from Private Technical School in 1975. An HVAC/Refrigeration Contractor . Have Unlimited Heating/Piping and Cooling Contractor License.Limited Sheetmetal Contractors License.NATE Certifield. York Certifield Master Heat Pump Technician 1986. Served 33 years combination Active Duty Air Force , Air Force Reserves and Air National Guard in the HVAC/Refrigeration Shop/Mechanical Shop. Troubleshooting/Installing HVAC/Refrigeration Equiptment Worldwide. Retiring in 2003 as a Senior NCO ,and a Mechanical Superintendent.

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