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Question
Diane,

I have a ceiling heater and light installed directly over the shower in my bathroom.  This was in the house when I purchased it six years ago.  There is no fan or exhaust going outside.  The unit is no longer working and I want to replace it with a similar unit.  Is it okay to have one of these heaters/lights directly over a shower?  I have read that they should not be installed directly over a shower, but that it how it is currently installed in my bathroom.  I would like to be able to use the existing hole in the ceiling and not have to patch it and create a new one in a different spot in the bathroom.  Thanks

Answer
Hello, Jared.

As much as you'd like to have an exhaust fan and heater in your shower, don't do it! The unit that's currently installed was probably done by the previous homeowner, and doesn't comply with safety codes relating to wet locations, i.e., tubs and showers. UL approval doesn't mean that a product can be used anywhere.

This is a direct quote from Broan on their website, in answer to a question about a heat-fan combination:

"Thank you for your question on the model QTX110HL. This model should be installed on its own, dedicated 20 amp circuit breaker. No heaters can be installed over a tub/shower location."

BroanCustomerService
- See more at: http://www.broan.com/products/product/b0e3dbcc-4373-46e5-b9ec-6cc80247d2c3#sthas

I'm sorry if you're disappointed by this news. Bathroom fan-heater combinations are great. I know you'd like to avoid the expense of hiring someone to install the new unit in a different location, but it's the best option for you in the long run.

Good luck, Jared.

Regards,

Diane Plesset, CMKBD, NCIDQ, C.A.P.S.
D. P. Design  

Home Improvement--General

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Diane Plesset

Expertise

I will answer questions about anything to do with bathroom remodeling: design considerations, safety, function, materials (cabinets, countertops, plumbing fixtures and fittings, lighting/switching, heating and ventilation, tile, stone, concrete, tub and shower enclosures, flooring, etc.), saving water, trends, ROI, and appearance.

Experience

25+ years as a bath-kitchen design specialist, hundreds of completed bathroom projects (all styles, all investment ranges). Author of "THE Survival Guide: Home Remodeling," co-host of a home improvement program on a local radio station for over three years. Currently hosting "Today's Home" on Lifestyle WebRadio every Sunday afternoon (http://www.todays-home.com).

Organizations
NKBA (National Kitchen and Bath Association), NAHB (National Association of Home Builders), PRO (Portland Remodelers' Organization), IDPC (Interior Design Protection Council).

Publications
"THE Survival Guide: Home Remodeling" (my book, published in 2003), Designers' Illustrated Magazine, Gentry Magazine, Kitchen-Bath Business Magazine, Kitchen-Bath Design News Magazine,Interior Coordinator Magazine (Japan); San Jose Mercury News, San Mateo Times, San Francisco Chronicle, Statesman Journal, Portland Tribune, Oregonian.

Education/Credentials
Multiple degrees: Bathroom Design, Residential Interior Design, Kitchen Design, and Lighting Design. Regularly attend classes and seminars to maintain current knowledge about codes, trends, sustainability, new products, etc.

Awards and Honors
Awards: Henry Adams Designer of the Year, CoTY, Master Design, Best of the Best, Chrysalis, Excellence (best home in its category), and NABE (best how-to book, 2003). "THE Survival Guide: Home Remodeling" received #1 listing in the City of Chicago publication, "Hiring The Pros".

Past/Present Clients
To see photos of completed projects, visit my website: http://www.dp-design.com/portfolio

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