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Question
I have a very old Hitachi AM-FM Stereo Receiver, Model# SR-803. It works fine. However, my old speakers do not work anymore. I want to connect the Stereo receiver to my new Sony Bravia LCD TV so that I can use the TV speakers for my stereo receiver system. I am trying to avoid buying two new speakers for the stereo receiver.

The speaker outlets on my stereo Receiver can only take old audio cables - open ended. For example, the left speaker outlet has two terminals, marked A and B. Each of them (i.e., either A or B ) has two connecting terminals marked '+' and '-', where two (positive and negative) ends of the audio cable are connected (naked cable end wrapped around the post). Similar connections for the right speaker.

My TV accepts HDMI cables, and has terminal marked "Audio In" for L and R . The cable box is connected to the TV using HDMI cable. The DVD player is connected to the TV using component cables (five separate cables).

Please advise if it is possible to connect the Hitachi Stereo Receiver to my new Sony HD TV (so that the TV speakers can be used for the stereo receiver); and if possible, how do I connect them together (what cables to use etc)?

Thanks
Debo

Answer
No you cannot do this as proposed - it presents considerable risk to both the television and the amplifier to connect an amplifier output (the Hitachi's speaker terminals) and a line input (the TV's inputs). The output taps on the Hitachi are conventional amplifier outputs, and assume a loudspeaker load. The TV is expecting a line source that has substantially less power behind it, and is designed to drive into substantially higher impedance. It also expects the source to be "full scale" (meaning that it does not have volume control applied ahead of it), as the TV provides its own volume and tone controls.  My advice would be to purchase speakers for the Hitachi, as they will be of higher quality than what the television has installed. Depending on the outputs available on the TV (or on the source devices you're using), you could also connect that audio through the Hitachi (and out through it's speakers); this would allow you to use external stereo speakers with the TV. However the switching of inputs will require more interaction.  

In the short term, you can connect the "Tape Rec Out" from the Hitachi to the TV's "Audio In" with standard RCA cables, and you should be able to monitor the AM/FM tuner with the settings on both devices appropriately configured (you will likely need to set the "Rec Out" on the receiver to the appropriate source, and select the input on the TV that corresponds with the "Audio In"). I would not suggest this as a long-term fix, as it will wear the TV more quickly (forcing it to be on just to use its speakers), and use considerably more power than adding speakers to the Hitachi (as the Hitachi's amplifier will still be powering itself on and idling with no speakers, plus the power demand for the TV). I'm not expecting any substantial harm, at least in the near-term, with this kind of configuration - but it isn't anything I'd suggest as a "fix" overall, simply due to the inefficiency.

Stereo speakers are relatively inexpensive, as long as you aren't looking for large floor-standing models. For example:
http://www.amazon.com/Yamaha-NS-6490-Bookshelf-Speakers-Finish/dp/B00018Q4GA/ref
http://www.amazon.com/Acoustimass-IV-speaker-system-Black/dp/B00006J054/ref=sr_1
http://www.amazon.com/Polk-Audio-TSi100-Bookshelf-Speakers/dp/B00192KF12/ref=sr_

If you have any further questions, feel free to ask.

-bob

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Bobbert

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Questions regarding HTPC integration to home theaters, and general purchasing advice regarding home theater and audio systems, including headphones. Please no car audio or over the top PA systems.

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General enthusiast, ~10 years as an audio and electronics hobbyist

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Engineering student, various DIY experiences, personal hobby

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