You are here:

Horticulture/Photosynthesis process and its applications.

Advertisement


Question
QUESTION: Dear Susan

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Photosynthesis

http://biology.clc.uc.edu/courses/bio104/photosyn.htm‎

http://biology.about.com/od/plantbiology/a/aa050605a.htm

http://bioenergy.asu.edu/photosyn/education/photointro.html

http://thebesthowto.com/stories/24175/Photosynthesis-For-Dummies.html

http://www.scienceclarified.com/everyday/Real-Life-Earth-Science-Vol-2/Energy-an

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g78utcLQrJ4‎

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XV9FOWleErA‎

https://www.khanacademy.org/science/biology/photosynthesis/v/photosynthesis

http://www.biotopics.co.uk/plants/psfac2.html‎

http://www.radford.edu/jkell/photosynthesis.105.pdf‎

https://www.msu.edu/user/morleyti/sun/Biology/photochem.html

Photosynthesis Process has practical applications in Agriculture and Pharmaceutical Industries.

Isn't it ?.

Awaiting your reply,

Thanks & Regards,
Prashant S Akerkar

ANSWER: Hello Prashant,

So sorry for the delay in answering.  Yes, artificial photosynthesis has many applications, and is being studied as a clean energy source.  Initially, it was looked at to boost crop yields, but then genetic modification came along.
here is a quote from the link below:

In the biotechnology field, photosynthetic organisms are likely to play an increasing role in (over)production of enzymes, pharmaceuticals, nutraceuticals, etc., which until now are produced primarily by genetically modified heterotrophic microorganisms such as yeast and selected bacteria. A major advantage of photosynthetic organisms is that no fixed-carbon source needs to be added for growth and, therefore, production costs are lower and the chances of contamination with other microorganisms are less. There are several ways to modify organisms to have them

http://bioenergy.asu.edu/photosyn/education/photointro.html
Thanks,
Susan



---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

QUESTION: Dear Susan

Thank you.

http://www.nbcnews.com/technology/photosynthesis-interrupted-plant-parts-used-ge

Can we explore this to generate electricity ?.

Awaiting your reply,

Thanks & Regards,
Prashant S Akerkar

Answer
Hi Prashant,

I'll be happy to gather all the information I can find for you.
This first link has an interesting slide show - this is the Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis.  

http://solarfuelshub.org/

Dr. Devens Gust is a leader in this field of research.  Here is his website:

http://photoscience.la.asu.edu/photosyn/faculty/gust/index.htm

Below is The Royal Society of Chemistry report:

http://www.rsc.org/ScienceAndTechnology/Policy/Documents/solar-fuels.asp

I found this Boston College research using rust to increase the cathode photovoltage quite interesting:

http://phys.org/news/2013-10-rust-power-artificial-photosynthesis.html

Thank you for your question
Susan

Horticulture

All Answers


Answers by Expert:


Ask Experts

Volunteer


Susan Tabor

Expertise

Entomology,plant pathology, agronomy, native plants, useful and edible plants,medicinal plants,landscape design and installation, plant taxonomy and identification, cultivars and varieties, Botany, nutrient deficiencies, plant recommendations and troubleshooting.

Experience

35 years as a professional horticulturist and landscape contractor. I have a network of contacts at leading universities and with acknowledged experts in the field. I've restored the landscapes of several plantations, 2 Governors mansions and owned/managed 3 nursery/garden centers. I discovered a new subspecies of Emelia in 1997. I've locally introduced several native or volunteer species into mainstream landscape design.

Publications
Morning Advocate The Register Better Homes and Gardens All Experts - Approx 1996-97

Education/Credentials
Louisiana State University - horticulture David L. Hoffman - California - phytotheraphy

©2016 About.com. All rights reserved.