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Question
Consider Potential Appraisal, Assessment Centres, and Career and Succession Planning in an organizational context. Describe the dynamics of these concepts, their interactional outcomes, and impact  on overall functioning and management of the organization.
  Put down your experience with respect to the dynamics of these factors in totality as seen by you in an organizational situation or the situations which you are familiar with.   
Briefly describe the situation and the organization, you are referring to.

Answer
Consider Potential Appraisal, Assessment Centres, and Career and Succession Planning in an organizational context. Describe the dynamics of these concepts, their interactional outcomes, and impact  on overall functioning and management of the organization.
  Put down your experience with respect to the dynamics of these factors in totality as seen by you in an organizational situation or the situations which you are familiar with.   
Briefly describe the situation and the organization, you are referring to.
POTENTIAL APPRAISAL
In consonance with the philosophy of human resource development that has
replaced the erstwhile personnel management in many organisations, more
emphasis has been laid on the appraisal of the employees’ potential in addition to
their performance. Performance is a thing of the past, while potential includes the
possible knowledge, skills, and attitudes the employee may possess for better
performance.
The purposes of a potential review are:
1. to inform employees of their future prospects;
2. to enable the organisation to draft a management succession programme;
3. to update training and recruitment activities;
4. to advise employees about the work to be done to enhance _their career
opportunities.
The following are some of the requirements and steps to be followed when
introducing a potential appraisal system:
Role Description: A good potential appraisal system would be based on clarity of
roles and functions associated with the different roles in an organisation. This
requires extensive job descriptions to be made available for each job. These job
descriptions should spell out the various functions involved in performing the job.
Qualities Required: Besides job descriptions, it is necessary to have a detailed list of
qualities required to perform each of these functions. These qualities may be
broadly divided into four categories - (1) technical knowledge and skills, (2)
managerial capabilities and qualities, (3) behavioural capabilities, and (4)
conceptual capabilities.
Indicators of Qualities: A good potential appraisal system besides listing down
the functions and qualities would also have various mechanisms for judging these
qualities in a given individual. Some of the mechanisms for judging these qualities
are - (a) rating by others, (b) psychological tests, (c) simulation games and
exercises, (d) performance appraisal records.
Organising the System: Once the functions, the qualities required to perform these
functions, indicators of these qualities, and mechanisms for generating these
indicators are clear, the organisation is in a sound position to establish and operate
the potential appraisal system. Such establishment requires clarity in
organisational policies and systematisation of its efforts.
Feedback: If the organisation believes in the development of human resources it
should attempt to generate a climate of openness. Such a climate is required for
helping the employees to understand their strengths and weaknesses and to create
opportunities for development. A good potential appraisal system should provide
an opportunity for every employee to know the results of assessment. He should be
helped to understand the qualities actually required for performing the role for
which he thinks he has the potential, the mechanisms used by the organisation to
appraise his potential, and the results of such an appraisal.
A good potential appraisal system provides opportunities continuously for the
employee to know his strengths and weaknesses. These are done through periodic
counseling and guidance sessions by either the personnel department or the managers
concerned. This should enable the employee to develop realistic self-perceptions and
plan his own career and development
=====================
Companies run a series of extended selection procedures, called assessment centres, each lasting one or two days or sometimes longer.
They are commonly held either on employers’ premises or in a hotel and are considered by many organisations to be the fairest and most accurate method of selecting staff. This is because a number of different selectors get to see you over a longer period of time and have the chance to see what you can do, rather than what you say you can do, in a variety of situations.

Assessment centres typically include a number of elements:

Social/informal events, where applicants  could meet a variety of people, including other candidates, the selectors, recent graduates and senior management. This is presented as an opportunity for the applicants  to find out about the organisation and to ask questions in a more casual setting. These events may appear informal and not part of the true assessment procedure but helps to  study  how  the  applicants behave in a way that reflects well on them.

Information sessions, which provide more details about the organisation and the roles available.  Tests  the  applicants  listening  capacity, as the information provided is likely to be more up to date than  previous research. If the applicants  are unclear about anything, ask. It is useful to have a question prepared for these sessions but make sure that the answer has not already been covered. Asking inappropriate questions just to get noticed will not impress the selectors.

Tests and exercises designed to reveal the applicants' potential. Selectors at assessment centres measure the applicants  against a set of competencies and each exercise is designed to assess one or more of these areas.  Also, remember that the  applicants  are being assessed against these competencies and not against the other candidates so, rather than trying to compete against them, make sure that  each applicant  demonstrate the qualities the organisation is seeking.

===============================================================
Exercises used at assessment centres

* Interviews - background, critical incident, situational, behaviour event
* Leaderless Group discussions.
Psychometric/aptitude tests
Case studies
In-tray exercises
Giving presentations
Group activities
*Management games
* Simulation exercises.
* Role plays

Interviews
You are still likely to encounter either a one-to-one or panel interview at assessment centres. These are likely to probe any weaker areas that may have emerged at a first interview. Interviews at this stage are likely to be more in-depth than those you experienced during the first stages of selection and could be with someone from the department/division to which you are applying or even with a potential future colleague. Questions may refer back to your first interview, to assessment centre activities or to aptitude test results. You should be prepared to be challenged on your answers but keep calm, consider your answers and avoid being defensive. You may be asked many of the same questions that you were asked at the first round. Treat this subsequent discussion independently – don’t assume that your interviewer is familiar with the answers you gave at an earlier stage.
Psychometric/aptitude tests
Aptitude tests
These are timed tests, taken under exam conditions, designed to measure your intellectual capacity for thinking and reasoning, particularly your logical/analytical ability. Increasingly, organisations are using these tests at a much earlier stage in the selection process and you may not be tested at the assessment centre itself. The tests are designed for specific roles and are meant to be challenging but you won’t be expected to have prior knowledge or experience of the role for which you are applying. Accuracy is more important than speed. Most tests are multiple choice and designed so that very few candidates both finish and get the correct answers. Sample questions may arrive with your letter of invitation.
If English is not your first language or if you are dyslexic, you are advised to declare this before the test, as the organisation might be able to allow you extra time or grade your results more appropriately. Test materials can be adapted for the visually or hearing impaired but you need to alert the assessors to your circumstances in advance.

Personality inventories
These assess your personality and how you might react in different situations. They are not usually timed, have no right or wrong answers and are often used to see if you would fit into the company culture and can identify a working situation that would suit you. You cannot practise for these tests but you should answer honestly and avoid trying to second-guess ‘correct’ answers.

Case studies
In these exercises, you are given a set of papers relating to a particular situation and asked to make recommendations in a brief report. The subject matter itself may not be important; you are being tested on your ability to analyse information, to think clearly and logically, to exercise your judgement and to express yourself on paper.
"The exercise was very time-pressured and I made the mistake of reading all the information given before starting to write anything down. I got the impression that not all the information was supposed to be relevant and that they were testing our ability to sift through written material to extract the most important things."

In-tray exercises
These are business simulation exercises in which you are given a heaped in-tray or electronic in-box, full of e-mails, company memos, telephone and fax messages, reports and correspondence, together with information about the structure of the organisation and your place within it. You are expected to take decisions: prioritise your workload; draft replies; delegate tasks; recommend action to superiors; and so on. Designed to test how you handle complex information within a limited time, the exercise allows you to demonstrate your organisational and planning skills. Some employers also want to know why you have made certain decisions and may ask you to annotate items in the tray or discuss your decisions later.
Giving presentations
Some employers will ask you to prepare a short talk for presentation to other candidates and/or the selectors. You may be asked to bring a prepared presentation to the assessment centre but usually it must be produced on the day. You could be given a topic for discussion or have completely free choice; it can be worthwhile to have a brief presentation on a familiar subject already prepared. Either way, avoid talking about anything too commonplace or technical and remember that you could be asked supplementary questions so it needs to be a subject on which you have further information to hand. The subject matter is not necessarily important – the organisation wants to know that you can structure and communicate information effectively.

Group activities
Most graduate jobs involve working with other people and most assessment centres involve a substantial element of group work. Whether you have to complete a practical task or take part in a discussion, the selectors are looking for your ability to interact with other people. Remember that good team working is not always about getting your ideas taken forward but listening to, and using, the ideas of others too.
Practical tasks
You may be asked as a group to use equipment or materials to make something (how to move a golf ball from one table to another using a paper clip and pipe cleaner, for example). The selectors are more interested in how the group interacts than in the quality of the finished product. They will also be assessing your planning and problem-solving skills and the creativity of your individual ideas. As with any group activity, get involved (however silly you consider the task to be).

Discussions and role plays
You may be asked to take part in a leaderless group discussion or in a role-playing exercise where you are given a briefing pack and asked to play a particular part. The assessors are looking for your individual contribution to the team, as well as your verbal communication and planning skills.


assess performance  dimension  against  pre-determined criteria that we have identified as being important in our organisation
=====================
Career planning is an individual's lifelong process of establishing personal career objectives and acting in a manner intended to bring them about.

Career management is the process of deciding what work opportunities to accept or reject, depending on their perceived value in helping achieve career objectives. It includes not only decisions made by an individual but also those made about the individual by managers and others who control what work opportunities can be made available.

Career development is the process of improving an individual's abilities in anticipation of future opportunities for achieving career objectives. Finally, and perhaps most importantly, a career consists of the organized structure and sequence of patterns in an individual's work life.

Strategic Career Planning
Instead of devoting so much attention to explaining or describing why people decide on the careers they do, individuals and career counselors probably need to devote more attention to strategic career planning. Using this framework, individuals focus on such issues as:
1. Who am I? Where am I going?
2. What are my present personal strengths and weaknesses?
3. What conditions inside and outside the organization—as well as occupation—will create future opportunities or pose future threats for me in my occupation or job?
4. What choices for long-term career strategy are available to me?
5. Which choice is likely to do the best job of maximizing my present strengths and future opportunities while, at the same time, minimizing my present weaknesses and future threats?
6. How can my long-term career strategy be implemented? In particular, what skills will I need over time? What is the role of family and personal life in my career?
7. How can the relative success of my career strategy be evaluated? When should it be evaluated?
====================
Succession planning is a process whereby an organization ensures that employees are recruited and developed to fill each key role within the company. Through your succession planning process, you recruit superior employees, develop their knowledge, skills, and abilities, and prepare them for advancement or promotion into ever more challenging roles.
Actively pursuing succession planning ensures that employees are constantly developed to fill each needed role. As your organization expands, loses key employees, provides promotional opportunities, and increases sales, your succession planning guarantees that you have employees on hand ready and waiting to fill new roles.
Effective, proactive succession planning leaves your organization well prepared for expansion, the loss of a key employee, filling a new, needed job, employee promotions, and organizational redesign for opportunities. Successful succession planning builds bench strength.
==================
Career  Planning  is   a  critical  element /  outcome   of   SUCCESSION  PLANNING, Performance  appraisal  and  Potential  assessment  systems.


The process of career planning

Career planning is the key process in career management. It uses all the information provided by the organization's assessments of requirements, the assessments of performance and potential and the management succession plans, and translates it in the form of individual career development programs and general arrangements for management development, career counseling, mentoring and management training.

Career planning   the competency band approach

It is possible to define career progression in terms of the competencies required by individuals to carry out work at progressive levels of responsibility or contribution. These levels can be described as competency bands.

Competencies would be defined as the attributes and behavioral characteristics needed to perform effectively at each discrete level in a job or career family. The number of levels would vary according to the range of competencies required in a particular job family. For each band, the experience and training needed to achieve the competency level would be defined.

These definitions would provide a career map incorporating 'aiming points' for individuals, who would be made aware of the competency levels they must reach in order to achieve progress in their careers. This would help them to plan their own development, although support and guidance should be provided by their managers, and HR specialists . The provision of additional experience and training could be arranged as appropriate, but it would be important to clarify what individual employees need to do for themselves if they want to progress within the organization.

The advantage of this approach is that people are provided with aiming points and an understanding of what they need to do to reach them. One of the major causes of frustration and job dissatisfaction is the absence of this information.

A competency band career development approach can be linked to

Aiming points

1. Competence  band 1 definition         
  Basic training and   experience   

2. Competence  band  2  definition
  Continuation    of  medium  training  and experience
3.Competence  band  3  definition
         Continuation  of advanced training and experience   
         


Career planning is for core people as well as high flyers

The philosophy upon which career plans are based refers not only to advancing careers to meet organizational and individual requirements, but also the need to maximize the potential of the people in the organization in terms of productivity and satisfaction under conditions of change, when development does not necessarily mean promotion.

career planning is for individuals as well as the organization

Career planning procedures are always based on what the organization needs. But they have to recognize that organizational needs will not be satisfied if individual needs are neglected. Career planning has to be concerned with the management of diversity.

Career plans must therefore recognize that:

*   members of the organization should receive recognition as individuals with unique needs, wants, and abilities;
*   individuals are more motivated by an organization that responds to their aspirations and needs;
*   individuals can grow, change and seek new directions if they are given the right opportunities, encouragement and guidance.

Career planning techniques

Career planning uses all the information generated by the succession plans, performance, and potential assessments and self assessments to develop programs and procedures which are designed to implement career management policies, achieve succession planning objectives and generally improve motivation, commitment and performance. The procedures used are those concerned with:

0 personal development planning .
0 training and management development.
0 mentoring
0 career counseling

In addition, career planning procedures may cater for the rising stars by 'fast tracking' them, that is, deliberately accelerating promotion and giving them opportunities to display and enlarge their talents. But these procedures should pay just as much, if not more, attention to those managers who are following the middle route of steady, albeit unspectacular, progression.

1. Career counseling

Performance management processes, should provide for counseling sessions between individuals and their managers. These sessions should give the former the opportunity to discuss their aspirations and the latter the chance to comment on them   helpfully   and, at a later stage, to put forward specific
career development proposals to be fed into the overall career management programs.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
2.Personal development planning

Personal development planning is carried out by individuals with guidance, encouragement and help from their managers/HRM as required. A personal development plan sets out the actions people propose to take to learn and to develop themselves. They take responsibility for formulating and implementing the plan, but they receive support from the organization and their managers in doing so. The purpose is to provide  a 'self organized learning framework'.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
3. MANAGEMENT  DEVELOPMENT   

Formal approaches to management development

The formal approaches to management development include:

*   development on the job through coaching, counseling, monitoring and feedback by managers on a continuous basis associated with the use of performance management processes to identify and satisfy development needs, and with mentoring;

* development through work experience, which includes job rotation, job enlargement, taking part in project teams or task groups, 'action learning', and secondment outside the organization;

*formal training by means of internal or external courses;

*structured self development by following self managed learning programs agreed as a personal development plan or learning contract with the manager or a management development adviser   these may include guidance reading or the deliberate extension of knowledge or acquisition of new skills on the job.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mentoring

Mentoring is the process of using specially selected and trained individuals to provide guidance and advice which will help to develop the careers of the 'proteges' Allocated to them.

Mentoring is aimed at complementing learning on the job, which must always be the best way of acquiring the particular skills and knowledge the job holder needs. Mentoring also complements formal training by providing those who benefit from it with individual guidance from experienced managers who are 'wise in the ways of the organization'.

Mentors provide for the person or persons allocated to them :
advice in drawing up self development programs or learning contracts; general help with learning programs; guidance on how to acquire the necessary knowledge and skills to do a new job; advice on dealing with any administrative, technical or people problems individuals meet.

==================================================
Here’s what  I  typically  suggested  to companies that want to go though this process.
Define or validate the organization’s three-to five-year business strategy. This typically comes from the executive group and should be communicated broadly to the organization.
Determine the organization structure required to support the business strategy. For example, if the company is planning to grow by acquisition, the organization needs to be structured in such a way as to facilitate the integration of new divisions or business units.
Define job roles. Using the new organization structure, create specific job roles. The most important thing to remember in this step is to consider positions, not people. If you design positions around the capabilities of the current incumbents, not the business requirements, you’ll be setting yourself up for disappointment.
Define skills and competencies for each role. This step helps you to objectively determine the behaviors and knowledge required for successful performance in each role.
Place individuals into positions based on the skill and competency requirements. This also is a difficult step, because it forces you to take a hard look at individuals who may have been part of the organization for a long time. However, if the business requirements have changed, and have resulted in new skill and competency requirements, then the workforce you need will have changed concurrently.
Review compensation and other HR programs. Once the structure and roles have changed, it’s important to ensure that HR programs are aligned with the market. For example, if a position’s responsibilities change as a result of the organization assessment, then you should benchmark the new position’s compensation against the external market.
Communicate the changes. The effectiveness of your organization changes can be lost without the support of a strong communication and implementation program. People will want to know what is changing, why it’s changing, when it’s changing, etc., and it’s critical to never assume that people have the same perspective of the organization that management does. So over-communicate. Help people feel like they were part of the change process, not just affected by it. Get folks from the organization involved in some of the design decisions, and ask for their input along the way. It’s really the only way that a change like this will be sustainable.
Be flexible enough to change again soon. Change is never over, and new business challenges may force you to go through the same process again soon. As long as the organization understands why the changes are required, and they trust that management is steering the company in the right direction, you should be able to have a positive impact.


FIRST,
Succession planning, is a process for preparing people to meet an organization's needs for talent over time.  Succession planning “is perhaps best understood as any effort designed to ensure the continued effective performance of an organization, division, department, or work group by making provision for the development, replacement, and strategic application of key people over time.” Geared to developing the internal bench strength of an organization, succession planning is usually part of a larger talent management program that is intended to attract the best through recruitment, keep the best through effective retention practices, and develop the best people through well-targeted talent developmen

-----SUCCESSION  planning  is an  element  of   career   management  process.
It  is  an  outcome  of  
-corporate  strategic planning
-corporate  objectives
-corporate strategy.
-HR  OBJECTIVES
-HR  STRATEGY
Hence  you  need  to  review this  in detail.

SECOND,
AS  per  your  request,
I  have provided  few  materials  here.
1.SAMPLE  OUTLINE  OF   A POLICY.
2. ADDITIONAL  RESOURCES,  which you can use  to  tailor
your  policy.
BUT  before  you  work  on  your  policy,  you  will  need
-company  vision
-company mission  statement
-company objectives
-company  strategic   directions
-COMPANY  HR OBJECTIVES/ STRATEGY
-BUSINESS  PROCESS
-business  drivers  of  your company
-company succession  plan [ if  any]
-company retention plan
-performance  appraisal  systems
-performance  management  system
etc etc.
YOU  NEED  TO  REFER    THEM.
==================================   
SUCCESSION  planning  is an  element  of   career   management  process.
Career  Planning  is   a  critical  element /  outcome   of   

1.SUCCESSION  PLANNING,
2.Performance  appraisal  and  
3.''Potential''   assessment  systems.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
FIRST   WE  DEVELOP  THE  Outline for Succession Planning
Define where you currently are in your succession planning process.
•   What positions are you planning for?
•   What key people have you designated for succeeding to higher positions?
•   Where are they in their experience, education and training schedules?
•   What has changed since your last review?
•   What other candidates can you identify, either for future needs or to replace people who were in the process and either left your company or did not work out as expected?
What has changed inside your company which might alter where you have been planning to go with your succession plan?
•   How have the current candidates performed to date?
•   What jobs have changed, and how have they changed, since your last review?
•   What new opportunities, technologies and other issues have emerged which may lead to change in the succession plan, its objectives or tactics?
Define where you want your succession plan to take you, especially in light of your current strategic plan.
•   What will you look like in three to five years and what will your key people be doing then?
•   What openings will you need to fill due to attrition, promotion or expansion?
•   What new disciplines will the company require, and how will you fill them?
•   How does your succession plan fit with your expectation of where your company, your markets and your internal situation will likely be going?
Define how you will get from where you are today to what you want the company to look like at the end of your current planning horizon.
•   Who will be involved and what will each be doing?
•   When will they start and end each part of the process and how will you judge their progress?
•   What criteria will be used to determine each candidate’s ongoing fitness for his or her career path?
•   Does each candidate offer and demonstrate continuing potential and progress toward meeting the requirements you have established?
•   On what basis will you determine if someone is not progressing appropriately, and what can you do to help that person develop to the fullest extent?
•   What alternatives can you offer those who are not meeting expectations?
Once a plan is in place and people are in the process of being groomed for higher responsibilities and positions, where do you go from here? As indicated above, this is an ongoing process. You establish goals, select candidates, establish training and educational processes, initiate the process of selecting and training with each individual, and monitor developments. As the Simplified Strategic Planning process teaches, you continually update your status, review your assumptions about where you want to go and how you will get there, modify your strategies and the resulting actions/action plans, and continually feed back environmental developments. As your situation changes, you alter your objectives to match the appropriate strategies, make mid-course corrections, and continue your ongoing management processes as a part of the regular course of business.



The process of career planning

Career planning is the key process in career management. It uses all the information provided by the organization's assessments of requirements, the assessments of performance and potential and the management succession plans, and translates it in the form of individual career development programs and general arrangements for management development, career counseling, mentoring and management training.

Career planning   the competency band approach

A competency band career development approach  is   linked to

1. Competence  band 1 definition         
Basic training and  experience   

2. Competence  band  2  definition
Continuation    of  medium  training  and experience

3.Competence  band  3  definition
  Continuation  of advanced training and experience   
         



WE  USE  THE   FOLLOWING  Career planning techniques

Career planning uses all the information generated by the succession plans, performance, and potential assessments and self assessments to develop programs and procedures which are designed to implement career management policies, achieve succession planning objectives and generally improve motivation, commitment and performance. The procedures used are those concerned with:

0 personal development planning .
0 training and management development.
0 mentoring
0 career counseling

In addition, career planning procedures may cater for the rising stars by 'fast tracking' them, that is, deliberately accelerating promotion and giving them opportunities to display and enlarge their talents. But these procedures should pay just as much, if not more, attention to those managers who are following the middle route of steady, albeit unspectacular, progression.

1. Career counseling

Performance management processes, should provide for counseling sessions between individuals and their managers. These sessions should give the former the opportunity to discuss their aspirations and the latter the chance to comment on them   helpfully   and, at a later stage, to put forward specific
career development proposals to be fed into the overall career management programs.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
2.Personal development planning

Personal development planning is carried out by individuals with guidance, encouragement and help from their managers/HRM as required. A personal development plan sets out the actions people propose to take to learn and to develop themselves. They take responsibility for formulating and implementing the plan, but they receive support from the organization and their managers in doing so. The purpose is to provide  a 'self organized learning framework'.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
3. MANAGEMENT  DEVELOPMENT   

Formal approaches to management development

The formal approaches to management development include:

*   development on the job through coaching, counseling, monitoring and feedback by managers on a continuous basis associated with the use of performance management processes to identify and satisfy development needs, and with mentoring;

* development through work experience, which includes job rotation, job enlargement, taking part in project teams or task groups, 'action learning', and secondment outside the organization;

*formal training by means of internal or external courses;

*structured self development by following self managed learning programs agreed as a personal development plan or learning contract with the manager or a management development adviser   these may include guidance reading or the deliberate extension of knowledge or acquisition of new skills on the job.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mentoring

Mentoring is the process of using specially selected and trained individuals to provide guidance and advice which will help to develop the careers of the 'proteges' Allocated to them.

Mentoring is aimed at complementing learning on the job, which must always be the best way of acquiring the particular skills and knowledge the job holder needs. Mentoring also complements formal training by providing those who benefit from it with individual guidance from experienced managers who are 'wise in the ways of the organization'.

Mentors provide for the person or persons allocated to them :
advice in drawing up self development programs or learning contracts; general help with learning programs; guidance on how to acquire the necessary knowledge and skills to do a new job; advice on dealing with any administrative, technical or people problems individuals meet.
=================================================
WE  USE  THE  FOLLOWING   APPROACH
1.THE  PERFORMANCE  APPRAISAL   REPORT.
-job  description /  responsibilities.
-job  role/ position  competencies [functional  competencies/ personal  competencies ]
-performance  ratings  AGAINST  STANDARDS by  supervisor/manager/self / FINAL.

2.EMPLOYEES  DATA  INPUT.
-employee's readiness  on  the  job.
-employee  aspirations.
-employee's  potential.
3.EMPLOYEE'S  DATA  OUTPUT
-INDIVIDUAL   DEVELOPMENT  PLANS.
Drill down to individual Development Plans – ensure development is appropriate for the individual
development plans/career counseling/mentoring/
management training/ education

-A  VISUAL   MAP

A  career  progression  opportunities.

competency models and behaviors that outline clear performance
expectations


4 .  Key guidelines to create & implement Career Pathing

• Ensure all career pathing tools and processes are aligned with the company vision

• Customize the career pathing map to the culture of your organization

• Identify specific, detailed behaviors for THIS  position along the career path

• Include a variety of entry points and alternative routes along the career path.
[FRESH  RECRUITS/ NEW TRANFERS/ PEOPLE  WITH EXPERIENCE]


• Use an integrated approach to connect selection, development, performance management and
succession planning

• Evaluate an individual’s position readiness using benchmarked analyses

• Utilize validated, position-based  PERFORMANCE   ASSESSMENT  tools for your career pathing evaluations

• Create developmental plans to help propel individuals along your organizational career pathing
[IDP = INDIVIDUAL   DEVELOPMENT  PLAN - sample  shown below]

• Understand the types of experiences necessary to be successful in the  role along the path

• Plan a comprehensive communications plan to introduce Career Pathing and educate mangers on
best practices
====================================================
An  outline  of   contents  for  the  assessment  form.
A.JOB POSITION.
B.JOB  RESPONSIBILITIES
**FIRST  COLUMN
FUNCTIONAL  COMPTENCIES
1.
2.
3.
.
.
PERSONAL  COMPETENCIES
1.
2.
3.
.
.
**SECOND  COLUMN
-assessment  standards  for  each  competencies.
**THIRD  COLUMN
-supervisor's ratings  against the  standard.
**FOURTH   COLUMN
-manager's ratings  against the  standard.
**FIFTH   COLUMN
-Self  ratings  against the  standard.
***SIXTH   COLUMN
-AVERAGE   ratings  against the  standard.

COMMENTS.
=================================================
IDP  Format
The following is a sample format. You may modify it as needed.

INDIVIDUAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN
Employee ___________________________________________ Department ______________________________
Position Title _______________________________ Period Covered ________________ to __________________

Development Goal   Purpose   Method or Activity   Results Expected/Measures   Time Frame













         
___________________________________ _______________________
Supervisor’s Signature Date
_____________________________________ _______________________
Employee’s Signature Date
Competencies
Whether the type of development you envision for the employee is to help her or him improve past performance, enhance current capabilities, expose the employee to skills needed in the future, or simply provide enrichment opportunities that make the current job more interesting, fun, or meaningful, what you will probably focus on developing are competencies. Competencies are observable and measurable knowledges, abilities, skills, and behaviors that must be applied to achieve results aligned with the goals of the organization.
You may select whatever competencies you feel are most important to develop and  list   them into your IDP.Competencies are fairly broad. You may find that, in addition to including the definition in the IDP, you will want to include some sub-tasks, or behavioral indicators, to help clarify what exactly you want the employee to develop. This is all stated in the “Development Goal.” Once this is laid out, determining the purpose and method/activity for accomplishing it will be easier.
The following sample lays out the information described above:
Example of Results Comments and Rating: Example of Corresponding IDP
Development Goal   Purpose   Method or Activity   Results Expected/Measures   Time Frame
Enhance Interpersonal Skills Develops and maintains effective relationships with others
Enhance Customer Service skills- Works with individuals who use or receive the services or products that your work unit produces to assess their needs, provide information or assistance, resolve their problems, or satisfy their expectations   To ensure that future projects take into consideration the needs and concerns of other units
Same as above   Planning phase of future projects will include identification of affected internal parties
Progress reports of future projects will be distributed to the affected parties identified above
Will take a PDS course in Customer Services   List completed
All affected parties identified per supervisor review




Progress reports distributed at least three times



Will be able to list three actions he can take to improve his customer service skills   Planning phase of projects undertaken in next evaluation period


Within next evaluation period



By March 1, 2004

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Human Resources

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Leo Lingham

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human resource management, human resource planning, strategic planning in resource, management development, training, business coaching, management training, coaching, counseling, recruitment, selection, performance management.

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18 years of managerial working exercise which covers business planning , strategic planning, marketing, sales management,
management service, organization development

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24 years of management consulting which includes business planning, corporate planning, strategic planning, business development, product management, human resource management/ development,training,
business coaching, etc

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Principal---BESTBUSICON Pty Ltd

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MASTERS IN SCIENCE

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