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CASE STUDY  :  1

Navin AGM materials, is fuming and fretting.  He bumped into Kiran, GM Materials, threw the resignation letter on his table, shouted and walked out of the room swiftly.

Navin has reason for his sudden outburst.  He has been driven to the wall.  Perhaps details of the story will tell the reasons for Navinís bile and why he put in his papers, barely four months after he took up his assignment.

The year was 2005 when Navin quit the prestigious Sail plant at Mumbai.  As a manager material Navin enjoyed the power.  He could even place an order for materials worth Rs 25 lakh. He needed nobodyís prior approval.

Navin joined a pulp making plant located at Pune as AGM Materials.  The plant is owned by a prestigious business house in India.  Obviously perks, designation and reputation of the conglomerate lured Navin away from the public sector.

When he joined the pulp making company, little did Navin realize that he needed prior approval to place an order for materials worth Rs 12 lakhs.  He had presumed that he had the authority to place an order by himself worth half the amount of what he used to do at the mega steel maker.  He placed the order material arrived, were recived, accepted and used up in the plant.

Trouble started when the bill for Rs 12 lakh came from vendor.  The accounts department withheld payment for the reason that the bill was not endorsed by Kiran.  Kiran rused to sign the bill as his approval was not taken by Navin  before placing the order.

Navin felt fumigated and cheated.  A brief encounter with Kiran only aggrarated the problem.  Navin was curtly told that he should have known company rules before venturing.  Navin decided to quit the company.


Q1)  Does the company have an orientation programme?

Q2)  If yes how effective is it?

Q3)  How is formal Orientation programme conducted?

Q4)  If you were Navin what would have you done?



CASE STUDY  :  2

Bitter it may taste, shrill it may sound, and sleepless nights it may cause, but it is true.  In a major shake up Airbus.  The European aircraft manufacturers has thrown a big shock to its employees.  Before coming to the details of the shock, a peep into the companyís resume.

Name   Airbus
Created   1970
President   CEO  : Vijay M.
Employees   57000
Turnover    26 Bn (Euro)
Total Aircraft sold (Feb 2007)   7187
Delivered   4598
Headquarters   Paris (France)
Facilities   16
Rival   Boeing

Airbus announced on February 27, 2007 that it would shed 10,000 jobs across four European contries and sell six of its unit.  N the same day the helpless workers did what was expected of them Ė downed tools and staged protests.  The protesting workers at Airbusís factory at Meaulte, northern France, were seen picketing outside the factory gate after holding up production a day earlier.  To be fair to Airbus, its management entered talks with unions before the job loss and sale was formally announced.  But the talks did not mollify the agitated workers.

Job sheating and hiring of units are a part of Power and restructuring plan unleashed by Airbus to save itself from increasing loss of its ground to the arch rival, Boeing Co.

Airbus Power & Strategy was first mooted in October 2006 but sparkled a split between France & Germany over the distribution of job losses and the placement of future ones.  Later the two countries agreed to share both job losses and new technology.

The power and plan, if finalized, would mean a 3 per cent reduction to Airbusís 55000 employee strength.


Q1)  Why should Power and focus on shedding jobs to save on cost?

Q2)  Are there no alternative strategies?

Q3)  Will the proposed shedding of jobs and scale of six units help airbus survive the intense competition from Boeing?

Q4)  Comment on the whole issue?

Answer
CASE STUDY : 1

Navin AGM materials, is fuming and fretting. He bumped into Kiran, GM Materials, threw the resignation letter on his table, shouted and walked out of the room swiftly.

Navin has reason for his sudden outburst. He has been driven to the wall. Perhaps details of the story will tell the reasons for Navinís bile and why he put in his papers, barely four months after he took up his assignment.

The year was 2005 when Navin quit the prestigious Sail plant at Mumbai. As a manager material Navin enjoyed the power. He could even place an order for materials worth Rs 25 lakh. He needed nobodyís prior approval.

Navin joined a pulp making plant located at Pune as AGM Materials. The plant is owned by a prestigious business house in India. Obviously perks, designation and reputation of the conglomerate lured Navin away from the public sector.

When he joined the pulp making company, little did Navin realize that he needed prior approval to place an order for materials worth Rs 12 lakhs. He had presumed that he had the authority to place an order by himself worth half the amount of what he used to do at the mega steel maker. He placed the order material arrived, were recived, accepted and used up in the plant.

Trouble started when the bill for Rs 12 lakh came from vendor. The accounts department withheld payment for the reason that the bill was not endorsed by Kiran. Kiran rused to sign the bill as his approval was not taken by Navin before placing the order.

Navin felt fumigated and cheated. A brief encounter with Kiran only aggrarated the problem. Navin was curtly told that he should have known company rules before venturing. Navin decided to quit the company.


Q1) Does the company have an orientation programme?

It doesínt  look like  the company   has  an  orientation  programme  or  it  is  inaffective.
----------------------------------------

Q2) If yes how effective is it?

It  is  not  as effective,  as it should  be.
------------------------------------------

Q3) How is formal Orientation programme conducted?
The orientation process has three stages:

1   A general orientation
2   A departmental orientation, and
3   A specific job orientation
They are conducted by different parties.
The General Orientation is usually managed by either the Training Department or the Human Resources Department, with the Departmental Orientation by the Department Head or first Assistant, while the specific Job Orientation can be carried out by an experienced and trained employee (trained on how to train). These guidelines are intended for people conducting the General Orientation:
A general rule of thumb for having the audience interested in the general orientation is to
1   Make them feel at ease (open circle).
2   Make sure that they had enough time to read the employee manual ahead of orientation time.
3   Spend a good portion of the introduction time towards self-introductions, spiced with open questions.
4   Get them to know who Management is: have a big chart in the orientation/training room which depicts how the organisation is set up, with photos of the management team next to their title.
5   Get them acquainted with the operation: have another large chart in the room depicting the flow of work and communications regarding the organization; this flow should include customers, suppliers and all parties affecting the organisation (I had just planned such a chart for the hotel where I dealt with Training and Development, wrote it out in text, had an artist depict it with cartoon characters on a big white chart, making it educational but humorous - after all this was a hotel. Maybe in a technical company humour is not allowed. I explained it to the artist and we showed how each job position affected the final product since the customer's / guest's first contact with the operation and ending with the last contact.
6   Have them know and see departments in operation: based on this drawing I conducted the orientation and explained all functions of the hotel, promising a personal tour of all the departments we discussed, including back areas, where the Department Heads received us personally and gave further insight on their departments.
7   Allay their fears and doubts: cover subjects which are usually never mentioned in orientations, such as the difficulties new employees or supervisors experience, about turnover figures, about how people assimilate better after hanging out three months, about how they can turn to you for any difficulties they experience, be it regarding their rejection by existing old-timers or other matters. Let them know they can always turn to you for confidential advice (do not forget that any new person has fears and doubts regarding being accepted, succeeding or failing).
8   Encourage friendships among new employees: try to create a team spirit among the existing group of newcomers - by the end of the day or the two days you will have created a group of employees at different levels and from different departments who will cooperate and enhance communications across the organisation.
9   Extend respect to them as human beings: have lunch with them as a group (I saw too many people who conduct orientations go to a different lunch room and this is very insulting).
10   Enable first hand contact with upper management: have different Executives come to welcome the group and assure them of management's commitment to help them succeed. Introduce each of the newcomers, dwell on their position, career background and personal interests.
11   Assure them that the organisation welcomes their observations, comments, and critiques.
12   Last but not least, share company goals with them. Discuss it with them. Ask what their own personal and career goals are and try to (right there and then) mesh their own goals with the company goals.
This strategy (action plan) has proven to be highly successful. It cuts down on turnover drastically, engenders trust, cooperation and motivation.




Although these sessions should be welcoming, orientations for new employees should also be more than a feel-good gesture. They should also be more than an instructional session that provides essential human resources, benefits, and payroll information for new employees. The most effective orientations help new employees understand what will be expected of them and prepare them for the organization's work culture.
Orient the expectations of new employees
Managing expectations has long been a mantra of salespeople, account executives, and others whose responsibilities are focused primarily outside the organization. Expectation management falls on human resources managers as well. Managing expectations can start as early as during new-employee orientations.
In new-employee orientations, the HR manager is essentially bringing new employees' expectations in line with the organization's expectations. Accurately aligning these sets of expectations in the first weeks of employment helps employees become productive more quickly and ensures that they enjoy greater job satisfaction throughout their tenures. Some studies suggest that well-executed new-employee orientations can also:
1   Lengthen the time that employees stay with a company.
2   Enhance staff cooperation and communication.
3   Improve client-customer relations because staff members have better work attitudes.
Communicate the organization's big picture
Where is your organization going? Even if your company has not made a formal strategic planning document, it has communicated some important long-term goals. Too often, however, these goals aren't shared with new employees whose efforts help determine whether the organization's goals are met. Therefore, it should come as no surprise that employees, even entire departments, sometimes operate under disparate assumptions about the company's priorities and objectives.
All new employees, from entry-level staff members to senior executives, should view themselves as members of an organization-wide team working toward a defined and united goal. Certainly new employees need to understand their specific roles, but first they need to understand the big-picture objectives of the organization, including objectives such as:
1   Is the organization striving to be an industry innovator?
2   Is the organization working to develop an international presence?
Whatever the objectives, new employees should be given a brief introduction to your organization's goals. If you can, provide a copy of your annual report or a company brochure that explains your organization's goals. With a bigger-picture perspective, employees are better equipped to understand their specific role as it relates to long-term objectives.
Describe the unspoken company culture
Company culture can't be fully captured in job descriptions or employee manuals, because culture is both explicit and unspoken. Most employees determine what behaviors are acceptable as the organization evolves. However, an effective orientation can help new employees transition more easily into the unique culture of your organization.
Even in highly conventional corporate cultures, it's preferable to share the unspoken aspects of company culture to ensure that all new employees understand their work environments. Don't make the mistake of assuming that cultural nuances are obvious or that new employees will raise questions if they're unsure about what to wear or when to arrive at work.
Some unspoken aspects of company culture to share are:
1   Dress code What's the norm for the dress code?
2   Internal communication Is vertical communication encouraged or frowned upon?
3   Phone etiquette Do employees routinely forward their phone calls to voice mail?
4   Parking Are there any unspoken rules about where employees can park?
5   Lunch Do most employees eat in or out? Are there good places to eat nearby?
6   Work hours Are work hours fixed or flexible?
7   Extracurricular activities Are there groups of employees that get together outside work?
8   Attitudes Are work teams more cooperative or more competitive?
Share the routine details
As a seasoned HR professional, you probably already use a comprehensive checklist to ensure that new employees receive and complete all required documentation, from W-4 forms to insurance forms to e-mail account requests. Unfortunately, the sheer volume of this paperwork can eclipse the routine information that new employees need on their very first day.
To help new employees get started, be sure that they know:
1   The layout of your office or campus A tour is preferable, but at the very least provide a user-friendly map.
2   The location of the restrooms Inform them of the locations of restrooms near their work areas.
3   Names and contact information of two coworkers Give them the contact information of two coworkers in their department, besides their immediate supervisor or hiring manager.
Outline the employee's specific role
The best way for new employees to become productive quickly is by immersing themselves in their new positions.
Immerse new employees in their jobs For positions with formal training, immersion is easy. New employees simply pass from orientation to training, often in the same day. For positions without formal training, role immersion can be more difficult.
Too often, supervisors and managers aren't available when new employees start, so employees are left with little more to do than read the company handbook during their first few days on the job. This can be confusing, especially for new employees who are expecting a challenging, fast-paced environment.
Introduce new employees to their jobs The best employee orientations conclude with introductions to each employee's specific job role. If several employees in a single role have been hired at one time, this introduction can occur in a group setting. Otherwise, new employees should receive one-on-one introductions from their managers or team leaders as part of their orientation.
Orient employees for success
Starting a new job always involves a learning curve, but effective orientations can help new employees make the transition by equipping them with:
1   An understanding of company goals.
2   An appreciation for the company's unique culture.
3   Routine information to get started.
4   An introduction to their role within the organization.
Employees who are well oriented to the company and to their jobs are ready to begin making a significant contribution.

##########################################

CASE STUDY : 4

Bitter it may taste, shrill it may sound, and sleepless nights it may cause, but it is true. In a major shake up Airbus. The European aircraft manufacturers has thrown a big shock to its employees. Before coming to the details of the shock, a peep into the companyís resume.

Name Airbus
Created 1970
President CEO : Vijay M.
Employees 57000
Turnover 26 Bn (Euro)
Total Aircraft sold (Feb 2007) 7187
Delivered 4598
Headquarters Paris (France)
Facilities 16
Rival Boeing

Airbus announced on February 27, 2007 that it would shed 10,000 jobs across four European contries and sell six of its unit. N the same day the helpless workers did what was expected of them Ė downed tools and staged protests. The protesting workers at Airbusís factory at Meaulte, northern France, were seen picketing outside the factory gate after holding up production a day earlier. To be fair to Airbus, its management entered talks with unions before the job loss and sale was formally announced. But the talks did not mollify the agitated workers.

Job sheating and hiring of units are a part of Power and restructuring plan unleashed by Airbus to save itself from increasing loss of its ground to the arch rival, Boeing Co.

Airbus Power & Strategy was first mooted in October 2006 but sparkled a split between France & Germany over the distribution of job losses and the placement of future ones. Later the two countries agreed to share both job losses and new technology.

The power and plan, if finalized, would mean a 3 per cent reduction to Airbusís 55000 employee strength.


Q1) Why should Power and focus on shedding jobs to save on cost?

It is a  mean  to  save  the  company  and  carry  on  the  good  work.
-------------------------------------  
Q2) Are there no alternative strategies?
THRER  ARE  ALTERNATIVES  BUT  THE  FUNDING  IS  THE  MAJOR  CONSTRAINT.
---------------------------------------
Q3) Will the proposed shedding of jobs and scale of six units help airbus survive the intense competition from Boeing?
YES, THIS  IS  THE  EXACT  SITUATION.
-----------------------------------
Q4) Comment on the whole issue?

THES  WHOLE  ISSUE   COULD  HAVE  BEEN  AVOIDED, IF  THERE  WAS  AN  EFFECTIVE   STRATEGIC  PLANNING.
#########################  

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Leo Lingham

Expertise

human resource management, human resource planning, strategic planning in resource, management development, training, business coaching, management training, coaching, counseling, recruitment, selection, performance management.

Experience

18 years of managerial working exercise which covers business planning , strategic planning, marketing, sales management,
management service, organization development

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24 years of management consulting which includes business planning, corporate planning, strategic planning, business development, product management, human resource management/ development,training,
business coaching, etc

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Principal---BESTBUSICON Pty Ltd

Education/Credentials
MASTERS IN SCIENCE

MASTERS IN BUSINESS ADMINSTRATION

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