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Question
QUESTION: 1.discuss the various benefits available to workers under the employee provident fund act 1952 and bonus act-1965

2.assume that you are a trainer for labour welfare officers.how will you train them?what types of training you will adopt for them?

3.critically examine the components of a managerial compensation package in indian public sector enterprises.

ANSWER: HERE  IS  SOME  SOME  USEFUL MATERIAL.
SOME  ANSWERS  HELD  BACK  DUE TO  SPACE CONSTRAINT.
PLEASE  FORWARD  THESE  BALANCE  QUESTIONS  TO  MY  EMAIL  ID   
leolingham2000@gmail.com.
I  will send  the balance  asap.
Regards
LEO  LINGHAM
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1.discuss the various benefits available to workers under the employee provident fund act 1952 and bonus act-1965

discuss the various benefits available to workers under the employee provident fund act 1952

THE EMPLOYEES’ PROVIDENT FUNDS AND MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS ACT, 1952
(Act No. 19 of 1952)

Benefits to Members under EPF Schemes



1. Provident Fund benefits

1. Employer also contributes to Members PF @ 12% ( 10% in case of sick industrial co., any establishment having accumulated loss equal to its entire paid up capital and any establishment in Jute Industry, Beedi Industry, Brick Industry, Coir Industry and Gaur Gum Factories. )
2. EPFO guarantees the Employer contribution and credits interest at such rates as determined by the Central Government.
3. Member can withdraw from this accumulations to cater to financial exigencies in life - No need to refund unless misused
4. On resignation, the member can settle the account. i.e., the member gets his PF contribution, Employer Contribution and Interest.   

2. Pension Benefits          

1. Pension to Member
2. Pension to Family (on death of member)
3. Scheme Certificate
•   This Certificate shows the service & family details of a member
•   This is issued if the member has not attained the age of 58 while leaving an establishment and he applies for this certificate
•   Member can surrender this certificate while joining another establishment and the service stated in the certificate is added with the service he is gaining from the new establishment.
•   After attaining the age of 50 or above, the member can apply for Pension by surrendering this scheme certificate (if total service is atleast 10 years)
•   This is a better choice than Withdrawal Benefit, as a member dies holding a valid scheme certificate, his family will get pension (Death when NOT in service)
3. Withdrawal Benefit
•   If not eligible for pension, member may withdraw the amount accumulated in his pension account
•   The calculation of this amount is based only on (i) Last average salary and (ii) Service (Not based on actual amount available in Pension Fund Account)
5. No amount is taken from Member to give Pension to the Member. Employer and Govt. contributes to Pension fund @8.33% and @1.16% respectively

6.  EPFO guarantees pension to members, even if the Employer has not contributed to Pension Fund.

4. Death Benefits          

1. Provident Fund Amount to Family (or to Nominee)
2. Pension to Family (or to Parent / Nominee)
3. Capital Return of Pension
4. Insurance (EDLI) amount to Family (or to Nominee)
•   No amount is taken from Member for this facility. Employer contributes for this.
5. Nominee is basically determined as per the information submitted by the member at this office through FORM-2

-- grant of exemption from the operation of the scheme/s framed under the Act to an establishment , to a class of employees and to an individual employee , on certain conditions.  
-- Penalties to employers/trustees of exempted Provident Fund who contravene the provision of the Act and the Scheme.
-- appointment of inspector to secure compliance under the Act and the Schemes framed  there under.






An Act to provide for the institution of provident funds, pension fund and deposit-linked insurance fund for employees in
factories and other establishments.
Be it enacted by Parliament as follows:-
1. Short title, extent and application.- (1) This Act may be called the Employees‟ Provident Funds and Miscellaneous Provisions Act,
1952.
(2) It extends to the whole of India except the State of Jammu and Kashmir.
(3) Subject to the provisions contained in section 16, it applies -
(a) to every establishment which is a factory engaged in any industry specified in Schedule I and in which twenty or more persons are
employed and
(b) to any other establishment employing twenty or more persons or class of such establishments which the Central Government may,
by notification in the Official Gazette, specify, in this behalf:
Provided that the Central Government may, after giving not less than two months‟ notice of its intention so to do, by notification in the
Official Gazette, apply the provisions of this Act to any establishment employing such number of persons less than twenty as may be
specified in the notification.
(4) Notwithstanding anything contained in sub-section 3 of this section or-sub-section 1 of section16, where it appears to the Central
Provident Fund Commissioner, whether on an application made to him in this behalf or otherwise, that the employer and the majority of
employees in relation to any establishment have agreed that the provisions of this Act should be made applicable to the establishment,
he may, by notification in the Official Gazette, apply the provisions of this Act to that establishment on and from the date of such
agreement or from any subsequent date specified in such agreement.
(5) An establishment to which this Act applies shall continue to be governed by this Act notwithstanding that the number of persons
employed therein at any time falls below twenty.
2. Definitions. - In this Act, unless the context otherwise requires, -
(a) “Appropriate Government” means -
(i) in relation to an establishment belonging to, or under the control of, the Central Government or in relation to, an establishment
connected with a railway company, a major port, a mine or an oil-filed or a controlled industry or in relation to an establishment having
departments or branches in more than one State, the Central Government: and
(ii) in relation to any other establishment, the State Government:
(aa) “authorised officer” means the Central Provident Fund Commissioner, Additional Central Provident Fund Commissioner, Deputy
Provident Fund Commissioner, Regional Provident Fund Commissioner or such other officer as may be authorised by the Central
Government, by notification in the Official Gazette;
(b) “basic wages” means all emoluments which are earned by an employee while on duty or on leave or on holidays with wages in either
case in accordance with the terms of the contract of employment and which are paid or payable in cash to him, but does not include-
(i) the cash value of any food concession;
(ii) any dearness allowance that is to say, all cash payments by whatever name called paid to an employee on account of a rise in the
cost of living, house-rent allowance, overtime allowance, bonus, commission or any other similar allowance payable to the employee in
respect of his employment or of work done in such employment;
(iii) any presents made by the employer;
(c) “Contribution” means a contribution payable in respect of a member under a scheme or the contribution payable in respect of an
employee to whom the Insurance Scheme applies;
(d) “controlled industry” means any industry the control of which by the Union has been declared by a Central Act to be expedient in the
public interest;
(e) “employer” means-
(i) in relation to an establishment which is a factory, the owner or occupier of the factory, including the agent of such owner or occupier,
the legal representative of a deceased owner or occupier and, where a person has been named as a manager of the factory under
clause f of sub-section 1 of section 7 of the Factories Act, 1948 (63 of 1948), the person so named; and
(ii) in relation to any other establishment, the person who, or the authority which, has the ultimate control over the affairs of the
establishment, and where the said affairs are entrusted to a manager, managing director or managing agent, such manager, managing
director or managing agent;
(f) “employee” means any person who is employed for wages in any kind of work, manual or otherwise, in or in connection with the work
of an establishment and who gets his wages directly or indirectly from the employer, and includes any person,-
(i) employed by or through a contractor in or in connection with the work of the establishment;
(ii) engaged as an apprentice, not being an apprentice engaged under the Apprentices Act, 1961 (52 of 1961) or under the standing
orders of the establishment;
(ff) “exempted employee” means an employee to whom a Scheme or the Insurance Scheme, as the case may be, would, but for the
exemption granted under section 17, have applied;
(fff) “exempted establishment” means an establishment in respect of which an exemption has been granted under section 17 from the
operation of all or any of the provisions of any Scheme or the Insurance Scheme, as the case may be, whether such exemption has
been granted to the establishment as such or to any person or class of persons employed therein;
(g) “factory” means any premises, including the precincts thereof, in any part of which a manufacturing process is being carried on or is
ordinarily so carried on, whether with the aid of power or without the aid of power;
(gg) ***
(ggg) ***
(h) “Fund” means the Provident Fund established under a Scheme;
(i) “industry” means any industry specified in Schedule I, and includes any other industry added to the Schedule by notification under
section 4;
(ia) “Insurance Fund” means the Deposit-linked Insurance Scheme framed under sub-section 2 of section 6C;
(ib) “Insurance Scheme” means the Employees‟ Deposit-linked Insurance Scheme framed under sub-section 1 of section 6C;
(ic) “manufacture” or “manufacturing process” means any process for making, altering, repairing, ornamenting, finishing, packing, oiling,
washing, cleaning, breaking up, demolishing or otherwise treating or adapting any article or substance with a view to its use, sale,
transport, delivery or disposal;
(j) “member” means a member of the Fund;
(k)“occupier of a factory” means the person, who has ultimate control over the affairs of the factory, and, where the said affairs are
entrusted to a managing agent, such agent shall be deemed to be the occupier of the factory;
(kA) “Pension Fund” means the Employees‟ Pension Fund established under
sub-section 2 of section 6A;
(kB) “Pension Scheme” means the Employees‟ Pension Scheme framed
under sub-section 1 of section 6A;
(ka) “prescribed” means prescribed by rules made under this Act;
(kb) “Recovery Officer” means any officer of the Central Government, State
Government or the Board of Trustees constituted under section 5A, who may be authorised by the Central Government, by notification
in the Official Gazette, to exercise the powers of a Recovery Officer under this Act;
(l) “Scheme” means the Employees‟ Provident Funds scheme framed under section 5;
(l1) “superannuation”, in relation to an employee, who is the member of the Pension Scheme, means the attainment, by the said
employee, of the age of fifty-eight years.
(m) “Tribunal” means the Employees‟ Provident Funds Appellate Tribunal constituted under section 7D.
2A. Establishments to include all departments and branches. - For the removal of doubts, it is hereby declared that where an
establishment consists of different departments or has branches, whether situate in the same place or in different places, all such
departments or branches shall be treated as parts of the same establishment.
3. Power to apply Act to an establishment which has a common provident fund with another establishment. - Where
immediately before this Act becomes applicable to an establishment there is in existence a provident fund which is common to the
employees employed in that establishment and employees in any other establishment, the Central Government may, by notification in
the Official Gazette direct that the provisions of this Act shall also apply to such other establishment.
4. Power to add to Schedule I. – (1) The Central Government may, by notification in the Official Gazette, add to Schedule I any other
industry in respect of the employees whereof it is of opinion that a Provident Fund Scheme should be framed under this Act, and
thereupon the industry so added shall be deemed to be an industry specified in Schedule I for the purpose of this Act.
(2) All notifications under sub-section 1 shall be laid before Parliament, as soon as may be, after they are issued.
5. Employees’ Provident Funds Scheme. – (1) The Central Government may, by notification in the Official Gazette, frame a scheme
to be called the Employees‟ Provident Fund Scheme for the establishment of provident funds under this Act for employees or for any
class of employees and specify the establishments or class of establishments to which the said Scheme shall apply and there shall be
established, as soon as may be after the framing of the Scheme, a Fund in accordance with the provisions of this Act and the Scheme.
(1A) The Fund shall vest in, and be administered by, the Central Board constituted under section 5A.
(1B) Subject to the provisions of this Act, a Scheme framed under sub-section 1 may provide for all or any of the matters specified in
Schedule II.
(2) A Scheme framed under sub-section 1 may provide that any of its provisions shall take effect either prospectively or retrospectively
on such date as may be specified in this behalf in the Scheme.
5A. Central Board. - (1) The Central Government may, by notification in the Official Gazette, constitute, with effect from such date as
may be specified therein, a Board of Trustees for the territories to which this Act extends hereinafter in this Act referred to as the Central
Board consisting of the following persons as members, namely:-
(a) a Chairman and a Vice-Chairman to be appointed by the Central Government;
(aa) the Central Provident Fund Commissioner, Ex officio;
(b) not more than five persons appointed by the Central Government from amongst its officials;
(c) not more than fifteen persons representing Governments of such States as the Central Government may specify in this behalf,
appointed by the Central Government;
(d) ten persons representing employers of the establishments to which the Scheme applies, appointed by the Central Government after
consultation with such organisations of employers as may be recognised by the Central Government in this behalf; and
(e) ten persons representing employees in the establishments to which the Scheme applies, appointed by the Central Government after
consultation with such organisations of employees as may be recognised by the Central Government in this behalf.
(2) The terms and conditions subject to which a member of the Central Board may be appointed and the time, place and procedure of
the meetings of the Central Board shall be such as may be provided for in the Scheme.
(3) The Central Board shall subject to the provisions of section 6 and section 6C administer the Fund vested in it in such manner as may
be specified in the Scheme.
(4) The Central Board shall perform such other functions as it may be required to perform by or under any provisions of the Scheme, the
Pension Scheme and the Insurance scheme.
(5) The Central Board shall maintain proper accounts of its income and expenditure in such form and in such manner as the Central
Government may, after consultation with the Comptroller and Auditor-General of India, specify in the Scheme.
(6) The accounts of the Central Board shall be audited annually by the comptroller and Auditor-General of India and any expenditure
incurred by him in connection with such audit shall be payable by the Central Board to the Comptroller and Auditor-General of India.
(7) The Comptroller and Auditor-General of India and any person appointed by him in connection with the audit of the accounts of the
Central Board shall have the same rights and privileges and authority in connection with such audit as the Comptroller and AuditorGeneral
has, in connection with the audit of Government accounts and, in particular, shall have the right to demand the production of
books, accounts, connected vouchers, documents and papers and inspect any of the offices of the Central Board.
(8) The accounts of the Central Board as certified by the Comptroller and Auditor-General of India or any other person appointed by him
in this behalf together with the audit report thereon shall be forwarded to the Central Board which shall forward the same to the Central
Government along with its comments on the report of the Comptroller and Auditor-General.
(9) It shall be the duty of the Central Board to submit also to the Central Government an annual report of its work and activities and the
Central Government shall cause a copy of the annual report, the audited accounts together with the report of the Comptroller and
Auditor-General of India and the comments of the Central Board thereon to be laid before each House of Parliament.
5AA. Executive Committee. – (1) The Central Government may, by notification in the Official Gazette, constitute, with effect from such
date as may be specified therein, an Executive Committee to assist the Central Board in the performance of its functions.
(2) The Executive Committee shall consist of the following persons as members, namely:-
(a) a Chairman appointed by the Central Government from amongst the members of the Central Board:
(b) two persons appointed by the Central Government from amongst the persons referred to in clause b of sub-section 1 of section 5A;
(c) three persons appointed by the Central Government from amongst the persons referred to in clause c of sub-section 1 of section 5A;
(d) three persons representing the employers elected by the Central Board from amongst the persons referred to in clause d of subsection
1 of section 5A;
(e) three persons representing the employees elected by the Central Board from amongst the persons referred to in clause e of subsection
1 of section 5A;
(f) the Central Provident Fund Commissioner, ex-officio.
(3) The terms and conditions subject to which a member of the Central Board may be appointed or elected to the Executive Committee
and the time, place and procedure of the meetings of the Executive Committee shall be such as may be provided for in the Scheme.







.discuss the various benefits available to workers under the employee  bonus act-1965

Explain the concept and enactment of payment of Bonus Act, 1965. Describe the obligations of employeesand rights of employees under this Act, citing examples from any organisationyou are familiar with. What can make an employee eligible or disqualified forthe payment of bonus under the Act?
PAYMENT OF BONUS ACT, 1965
    SECTION HEADING    PROVISION
3.1    Scope    *Salary (Basic + DA + any payment on account of rise in the cost of living) less than or equal to Rs.3500/-
*Employee should have worked for at least 30 working days during that year
3.2    Contribution    *8.33-20% of wages, to be made within 8 months of close of Accounting Year
3.3    Returns    Annual Return within 30 days after expiry of the time limit specified for payment of bonus (Form D)
3.4    Registers    (Form A)register showing the computation of the allocable surplus
(Form B)register showing set on and set off of the allocable surplus
(Form C)register showing the details of the amount of bonus due to each employee, deductions therefrom and the amount disbursed


Applicability of Act
Every factory where in 10 or more persons are employed with the aid of power or
An establishment in which 20 or more persons are employed without the aid of power on any day during an accounting yearc
Establishment

Establishment includes
Departments, undertakings and branches, etc.
Computation of available surplus

Income tax and direct taxes as payable.
Depreciation as per section 32 of Income Tax Act.
Development rebate, investment or development allowance.
Sec.5
Components of Bonus

Salary or wages includes dearness allowance but no other allowances e.g. over-time, house rent, incentive or commission.
Sec.2(21)
Separate establishment

If profit and loss accounts are prepared and maintained in respect of any such department or undertaking or branch, then such department or undertaking or branch is treated as a separate establishment.
Sec.3
Disqualification & Deduction of Bonus

On dismissal of an employee for
•   Fraud; or
•   riotous or violent behaviour while on the premises of the establishment; or
•   theft, misappropriation or sabotage of any property of the establishment or
•   Misconduct of causing financial loss to the Employer to the extent that bonus can be deducted for that year.
Secs. 9 & 18.
Computation of gross profit
For banking company, as per First Schedule.

Others, as per
Second Schedule
Sec.4
Eligibility of Bonus

An employee will be entitled only when he has worked for 30 working days in that year.
Sec. 8
Payment of Minimum Bonus
8.33% of the salary or Rs.100 (on completion of 5 years after 1st Accounting year even if there is no profit)
Sec.10
Sec.
Eligible Employees

Employees drawing wages upto Rs.3500 per month or less.
For calculation purposes Rs.2500 per month maximum will be taken even if an employee is drawing upto Rs.3500 per month.
Sec.12
Note: The proposal to enhance the existing ceiling of Rs.3500 is under active consideration by the Govt.
Time Limit for
Payment of Bonus
Within 8 months from the close of accounting y ear.          Sec. 19
Set-off and
Set-on
As per Schedule IV.
Sec. 15
Maintenance of Registers and Records etc.

•   A register showing the computation of the allocable surplus referred to in clause (4) of section 2, in form A.

•   A register showing the set-on and set-off of the allocable surplus, under section 15, in form B

•   A register showing the details of the amount of bonus due to each of the employees, the deductions under section 17 and 18 and the amount actually disbursed, in form C.
Sec.26, Rule 4
Act not applicable to certain employees of LIC, General Insurance, Dock Yards, Red Cross, Universities & Educational Institutions, Chambers of Commerce,  Social Welfare Institutions, Building Contractors, etc. etc. Sec.32.

PENALTY   For contravention of any provision of the Act or the Rule   Upto 6 months or with fine upto Rs.1000.        Sec.28



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---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

QUESTION: i cant mail the balance question to your above mentioned mail id..it shows permanent delivery failure..plz help me to get the balance answers.

Answer
2.assume that you are a trainer for labour welfare officers.how will you train them?what types of training you will adopt for them?
To enhance career in Human Resource Management/Industrial Relation/ Administrative Field with a Professional & Disciplined environment that will utilize my educational background and expand my knowledge to emerge as a reliable member of the management team and to prove myself as an important asset of the organization.

SYNOPSIS
Diploma in Social work (Labour Welfare) from Indian Institute of Social Welfare & Business Management under Calcutta University with more than 12 years experience in Human Resource Management/Industrial Relation as well as General Administration .
Pursuing a course on Post Graduate Diploma in Business Administration (Specialization in Human Resource Management) from SYMBIOSIS, Pune,Maharashtra.
Currently associated with JAPFA COMFEED INDIA PVT.LTD (Multinational Company, Processing of Animal Feeds (Poultry) Kharagpur, Dist West Midnapore, west Bengal) as Asst. Manager ‘HR & GA’.
Handling the overall function of HR, IR & General Administration of the Company.
Familiar with Statutory Compliances, licensing and its renewals as per Factories Act, Shops & Establishments Act, EPF Act, ESI Act, Gratuity Act, Bonus Act, Contract Labour Act, & submission of returns in time.
Experience in executing & implementing HR policies and other HR functions entailing Recruitment & Selection, Induction, Job Analysis & Job Specifications & Performance Appraisal.
Handling day to day disciplinary affairs, daily grievances of laborers & dealing with Trade Union on day to day matter.
Liaoning and maintaining harmonious relationship with Govt. Authorities.
Attending Court cases, investing & conducting cases, Negotiation with union & signing long term settlement.
Monitoring on Attendance, Payroll, Security, Transport & welfare amenities.
Effective communicator & leader with a can do attitude.

ORGANIZATIONAL EXPERIENCE
Since 20th Sep’2010 associated with JAPFA COMFEED INDIA PVT.LTD. (Multinational Company, Processing of Animal Feeds (Poultry) Kharagpur, Dist West Midnapore, west Bengal ) as Asst. Manager ‘HR &GA’.
Employee Strength  : Permanent Employees – 150, Managers & Staff 80,
Contract Laborers 300
The Key Result Areas  :
Handling the overall function of HR, IR & General Administration of the Company.
Manpower planning of the organization.
Handling the Recruitment & Selection Process along with all joining and exit formalities.
Job description of the employees in the organization.
Market survey to assist Management on compensation matter.
Payroll & compensation.
Implementation of Organizational Structure.
Implementation of HR Policies.
Design and conduct employees induction & orientation programs.
Develop training calendar, organizing and Coordinating training programs – both external as well as internal Programs.
Coordinate the appraisal, career development and Succession Planning activities of employees.
Coordinate the formulation & implementation of increments, incentives of the employees.
Designing the Salary Structures in the Company.
Preparing HR Budget.
Handling welfare activities such as housing facilities, recreational facilities, rest room & canteen to avert industrial conflict, promote harmonious relation with employees, and increase workers productivity.
Counseling with employees of Low Production.
Maintaining good liaison with Govt. Authorities & Local bodies for Statutory Compliance.
Managing dispute resolution procedures, motivating and encouraging employees through negotiations & conducting welfare programs like picnic, festival celebration birthday party etc.
Handling day to day disciplinary affairs, daily grievances of laborers .
Attending Court cases, investing & conducting cases , signing long term settlement
Conversant with Labour related Laws and Supervision of all Statutory Compliance in respect of PF, ESI, Leave, Gratuity, Bonus & Contract labour.
Assisting Management regarding grievances of employees & disciplinary matters.

GENERAL ADMINISTRATION  :
Handling Security Personnel, transport & house keeping.
Maintaining office & guest house equipments.
Monitoring plantation and day to day administrative requirements.
Monitoring Rail Ticket & Flight Ticket as well as hotel booking for guest.
Maintaining public Relation with Local police station.
Liaison with Local Political, NonPolitical leaders & social connection at District, Zonal, Block & Gram Panchyet Levels.

Previous Experience  :
Since April ’06 to 19th Sep’2010 associated with Crescent Foundry Co.
Sponsored links :

Pvt. Ltd. a manufacturing company, Howrah as ‘HR Manager’.
Duration  : 4 years & 5 months.
Employees Strength  : Permanent Employees – 200, Managers & Staff 50,
Contract Laborers 150
The Key Result Areas  :
Handling the overall function of HR, IR & Administration of the Company.
Forecast future staffing requirement of the Organisation.
Handling the recruitment & Selection Process along with all joining and exit formalities.
Formulating training programmes & policies relating to Promotion, transfer, motivation and retirement.
Formulating the Performance Appraisal System to identify developmental requirements and to initiate reward & recognition.
Handling welfare activities such as housing facilities, recreational facilities, rest room & canteen to avert industrial conflict, promote harmonious relation with unions & employees, increase workers productivity and reduce manpower turnover.
Counseling with employees of Low Production.
Payroll & compensation.
Assisting Management regarding grievances of employees & disciplinary matters.
Conversant with Labour related Laws and Statutory Compliance in respect of PF, ESI, Leave, Gratuity, Bonus & Contract labour.
Maintaining good liaison with Govt. Authorities & Local bodies for Statutory Compliance.
Managing dispute resolution procedures, motivating and encouraging employees through negotiations & conducting welfare programs like picnic, festival celebration birthday party etc.
Handling Security Personnel, transport & house keeping.
Handling day to day disciplinary affairs, daily grievances of laborers & dealing with Trade Union on day to day matter.
Attending Court cases, investing & conducting cases , negation with union & signing long term settlement.
Handling the attendance, Payroll, Salary disbursement, liaisoning with Bank & leave of the employee.

Previous Experience  :
Since Feb’00 to March’06 associated with The Hooghly Mills Co. Pvt. Ltd, a Jute Mill, Sreerampore, Dist – Hooghly, West Bengal as ‘Labour welfare Officer’.
Joined this organization as Labour Welfare Officer and further promoted & Confirmed as personnel officer.
Duration  : 6 Years & 1 month.
Employees Strength  : Permanent workmen3000, Temporary workmen1000,
Managers & Staff – 80, Contract Laborers 22
The Key Result Areas  :
Handling the recruitment & Selection Process along with all joining and exit formalities.
Handling welfare activities such as housing facilities, recreational facilities, rest room & canteen to avert industrial conflict, promote harmonious relation with unions & employees, increase workers productivity and reduce manpower turnover.
Familiar with Labour related Laws and Statutory Compliance in respect of PF, ESI, Leave, Gratuity, & Bonus.
Assisting Management regarding grievances of employees.
Maintaining Personnel files of individual employee..
Maintaining good liaison with Govt. Officials & Local bodies for Statutory Compliance.
Handling Security Personnel, transport, house keeping & welfare amenities of the employees.
Attending Court cases, investing & conducting cases .
Handling the attendance, Payroll, and salary disbursement of the employees.

OTHER SKILLS  :
COMPUTER SKILLS  : MS Word, Excel, Internet, email, scanning etc.
Language Skills  : Bengali, English, Hindi,

Other skills  :
Leadership Skills & ability to work in team
Good computational skills
Have good interpersonal & energetic with excellent communication skills.
Have ability to handle multiple tasks & confidential matters
Ability to inspire, train, and develop people
Can create courteous, friendly, professional work environment.

ACADEMIA  :
Post Graduate Diploma in Business Administration (Specialization in Human Resource Management) from SYMBIOSIS, Pune,Maharashtra.
Diploma in Social Work (Labour Welfare) from Indian Institute of Social Welfare & Business Management under Calcutta University.
Qualified in Viva voce test conducted by VIVAVOCE BOARD Constitute by the Labour Department, Govt. Of West Bengal.
Bachelor of Commerce from Burdwan University, West Bengal.

Strengths : Disciplined, punctual, tenacious and aggressive to learn more. I have ability to adapt & mingle with others culture.
=================

Training is a set of a systematic processes designed to meet learning objectives related to trainees' current or future jobs. These processes can be grouped into the following phases; needs analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation. The phases are sequential, with the outputs of the previous phases providing the inputs to those that follow. Figure 1 depicts the phases and their relationships. Training delivery methods consist of the techniques and materials used by trainers to structure learning experiences. Different training delivery methods are better or worse at achieving various learning objectives. During the design phase (see Figure 1) the different methods are examined to determine their appropriateness for the learning objectives. Once appropriate methods have been identified, they are applied to the training plan in the development phase.
There are three categories of learning objectives: knowledge, skills, and attitudes (KSAs). Knowledge objectives are of three types: declarative, procedural, and strategic. Declarative knowledge is the person's store of factual information. Procedural knowledge is the person's understanding about how and when to apply the facts. Strategic knowledge is used for planning, monitoring, and revising goal-directed activity. Skill reflects one's proficiency at specific tasks such as operating a piece of equipment, giving a presentation, or making a business decision. Attitudes are beliefs and/or opinions about objects and events and the positive or negative affect (feelings) associated with them. Attitudes affect motivation levels, which in turn influence a person's behavior. Most training programs have learning objectives for knowledge, skill, and attitudes; these programs need to combine several methods into an integrated whole because no single method can do everything well.
The various training delivery methods can be divided into cognitive and behavioral approaches. Cognitive methods provide information orally or in written form, demonstrate relationships among concepts, or provide the rules for how to do something. They stimulate learning through their impact on cognitive processes and are associated most closely with changes in knowledge and attitudes. The lecture, discussion, e-learning and, to some extent, case studies are cognitive methods. Though these types of methods can influence skill development, it is not their strength.
Conversely, behavioral methods allow the trainee to practice behavior in a real or simulated fashion. They stimulate learning through experience and are best at skill development and attitude change. Equipment simulators, business games, role plays, the in-basket technique, behavior modeling and, to some

Figure 1
Model of the Training Process
extent, case studies are behavioral methods. Both behavioral and cognitive methods can be used to change attitudes, though they do so through different means. On-the-job training is a combination of many methods and is effective at developing knowledge, skills, and attitudes, but is best at the latter two.
LECTURE METHOD
The lecture is best used for creating a general understanding of a topic. Several variations in the lecture format allow it to be more or less formal and/or interactive. In the pure lecture, communication is one way—from trainer to trainees. It is an extensive oral presentation of material. A good lecture begins with an introduction that lays out the purpose, the order in which topics will be covered, and ground rules about interruptions (e.g., questions and clarification). This is followed by the main body of the lecture in which information is given. The topic areas should be logically sequenced so that the content of preceding topics prepares trainees for the following topics. The lecture should conclude with a summary of the main learning points and/or conclusions.
During the pure lecture trainees listen, observe, and perhaps take notes. It can be useful in situations in which a large number of people must be given a limited amount of information in a relatively short period; however, it is not effective for learning large amounts of material in a short time period. Thus, an effective lecture should not contain too many learning points. Trainees will forget information in direct proportion to the amount of information provided. Because the pure lecture provides only information, its usefulness is limited; when the only training objective is to have trainees acquire specific factual information, better learning can be achieved at less cost by putting the information into text. This allows trainees to read the material at their leisure and as often as necessary to retain the material. The only added value provided by the lecture is credibility that may be attached to the lecturer or the focus and emphasis provided by trainer presentation skills. Another major benefit of the lecture is that it is interactive, and that trainees can ask questions or have the presenter change the pace of the lecture if necessary.
DISCUSSION METHOD
The discussion method uses two-way communication between the lecturer and the trainees to increase learning opportunities. This method uses a short lecture (20 minutes or less) to provide trainees with basic information. This is followed by a discussion among the trainees and between the trainees and the trainer that supports, reinforces, and expands upon the information presented in the short lecture. Verbal and nonverbal feedback from trainees allows the trainer to determine if the desired learning has occurred. If not, the trainer may need to spend more time on this area and/or present the information again, but in a different manner.
Questioning (by trainees or the trainer) and discussions enhance learning because they provide clarification and keep trainees focused on the material. Discussions allow the trainee to be actively engaged in the content of the lecture, which improves recall and use in the future. Trainee questions demonstrate the level of understanding about the content of the lecture. Trainer questions stimulate thinking about the key learning points.
The pure lecture is most useful when trainees lack declarative knowledge or have attitudes that conflict with the training objectives. The discussion method is more effective than the pure lecture for learning procedural and strategic knowledge because of the discussion and questioning components. If the training objective is skill improvement, neither the lecture or discussion method is appropriate.
Both the lecture and discussion method are useful for changing or developing attitudes, though the discussion method is more effective. The lecture, and especially the discussion, modify employee attitudes by providing new insights, facts, and understanding.
E-LEARNING
Many companies have implemented e-learning, which encompasses several different types of technology assisted training, such as distance learning, computer-based training (CBT), or web-based training (WBT). Distance learning occurs when trainers and trainees are in remote locations; typically, technology is used to broadcast a trainer's lecture to many trainees in many separate locations. Distance learning provides many of the same advantages and disadvantages as the lecture method. Distance learning can be much less expensive than paying for trainees in multiple locations to travel for a lecture, but it may reduce motivation to learn because of the remoteness of the trainer.
Computer-based training and web-based training are virtually similar. With this type of training, content is delivered through the computer, using any combination of text, video, audio, chat rooms, or interactive assessment. It can be as basic as reading text on a screen or as advanced as answering quiz questions based on a computerized video that the trainee has viewed. The difference between CBT and WBT is that, with CBT, the training program is stored on a hard-drive, a CD-ROM, or diskette. This means that it is not easy to update and may be more difficult for employees to access. Conversely, WBT is housed online through either a company's intranet or through the World Wide Web. This increases accessibility of training; employees may even be able to train from their home computers. Additionally, updates to content are quick and relatively easy. For example, if an error in the training content is found, one update on the training program housed on a server updates the content for every trainee who accesses it after that point. For a change to made to CBT, new CD-ROMs or diskettes would have to be produced.
E-learning is an alternative to classroom-based training, and it can provide a number of advantages. E-learning can:
•   reduce trainee learning time, by allowing trainees to progress at their own pace
•   reduce the cost of training, particularly by reducing costs associated with travel to a training location
•   provide instructional consistency, by offering the same training content to employees worldwide
•   allow trainees to learn at their own pace thereby reducing any boredom or anxiety that may occur
•   provide a safe method for learning hazardous tasks with computer simulations
•   increase access to training to learners in locations around the world
E-learning is effective at developing declarative and, in particular, procedural knowledge. It can be useful in developing some types of skills and for modifying attitudes. E-learning develops declarative knowledge through repeated presentation of facts, using a variety of formats and presentation styles. It can do an excellent job of describing when and how to apply knowledge to various situations. Procedural knowledge is developed by allowing trainees to practice applying the knowledge to various situations simulated by the software. This training delivery method is valuable because it can automatically document trainee's responses, interpret them, and provide appropriate practice modules to improve areas of weakness.
Using e-learning, skill development is limited by the software's ability to mimic the trainee's job environment and context. For some situations, such as training employees in the use of word processing, spread sheet, and other computer-based software, e-learning is an appropriate choice for teaching skills. Here, the tasks and situations trainees will face on the job are easily simulated by the training software. On the other hand, it is very difficult to develop CBT software that realistically simulates interaction between two or more people or a person and an object in a dynamic environment. Other methods must be utilized for these situations.
E-learning can be effective at developing or modifying attitudes. The factual relationships among objects and events, and the consequences of particular courses of action, can be portrayed in many ways with e-learning technology. How objects, events and their relationships are perceived can be altered by the visual and textual presented in a CBT. However, since the objects and events are simulated, rather than real, the emotional or affective side of attitudes may not be activated. In addition, there is no opportunity during e-learning to discuss attitudes with others in a setting where a trainer can monitor, direct, and reinforce the discussion to support the desired attitude(s). This may be one reason many adult learners indicate a preference for e-learning to be combined with some form of instructor-based training. Trainees often prefer blended training, which is when both computer and face-to-face training are combined, and it is used by many organizations.
SIMULATIONS
Simulations are designed to mimic the processes, events, and circumstances of the trainee's job. Equipment simulators, business games, in-basket exercises, case studies, role playing, and behavior modeling, are types of simulations.
EQUIPMENT SIMULATORS.
Equipment simulators are mechanical devices that incorporate the same procedures, movements and/or decision processes that trainees must use with equipment back on the job. Among those trained with this method are airline pilots, air traffic controllers, military personnel, drivers, maintenance workers, telephone operators, navigators, and engineers. To be effective the simulator and how it is used must replicate, as closely as possible, the physical and psychological (time pressures, conflicting demands, etc.) aspects of the job site. To facilitate this, the equipment operators and their supervisors should be involved in the simulation design and pre-testing. This reduces potential resistance to the training and, more importantly, increases the degree of fidelity between the simulation and the work setting.
BUSINESS GAMES.
Business games attempt to reflect the way an industry, company, or functional area operates. They also reflect a set of relationships, rules, and principles derived from appropriate theory (e.g., economics, organizational behavior, etc.). Many business games represent the total organization, but some focus on the functional responsibilities of particular positions within an organization (e.g., marketing director, human resource manager). These are called functional simulations. Games that simulate entire companies or industries provide a far better understanding of the big picture. They allow trainees to see how their decisions and actions influence not only their immediate target but also areas that are related to that target.
Prior to starting the game trainees are given information describing a situation and the rules for playing the game. They are then asked to play the game, usually being asked to make decisions about what to do given certain information. The trainees are then provided with feedback about the results of their decisions, and asked to make another decision. This process continues until some predefined state of the organization exists or a specified number of trials have been completed. For example, if the focus is on the financial state of a company, the game might end when the company has reached a specified profitability level or when the company must declare bankruptcy. Business games involve an element of competition, either against other players or against the game itself. In using them, the trainer must be careful to ensure that the learning points are the focus, rather than the competition.
IN-BASKET TECHNIQUE.
The in-basket technique simulates the type of decisions that would typically be handled in a particular position such as a sales manager or operations manager. It affords an opportunity to assess and/or develop decision-making skills and attitudes. To begin the exercise, trainees are given a description of their role (a current or future job) and general information about the situation. Trainees are then given a packet of materials (such as requests, complaints, memos, messages, and reports) which make up the in-basket. They are asked to respond to the materials within a particular time period (usually 2 to 4 hours). When the in-basket is completed, the trainer asks the trainee to identify the processes used in responding to the information and to discuss their appropriateness. The trainer provides feedback, reinforcing appropriate decisions and processes or asking the trainee to develop alternatives. A variation is to have trainees discuss their processes in a group format moderated by the trainer. Here the trainer should attempt to get the trainees to discover what worked well, what didn't and why.
CASE STUDY.
Case studies are most often used to simulate strategic decision-making situations, rather than the day-to-day decisions that occur in the in-basket. The trainee is first presented with a history of the situation in which a real or imaginary organization finds itself. The key elements and problems, as perceived by the organization's key decision makers, may also be provided. Case studies range from a few pages in length to more than a hundred. Trainees are asked to respond to a set of questions or objectives. Responses are typically, though not always, in written form. Longer cases require extensive analysis and assessment of the information for its relevance to the decisions being made. Some require the trainee to gather information beyond what was in the case. Once individuals have arrived at their solutions, they discuss the diagnoses and solutions that have been generated in small groups, large groups, or both. In large groups a trainer should facilitate and direct the discussion. The trainer must guide the trainees in examining the possible alternatives and consequences without actually stating what they are.
Written and oral responses to the case are evaluated by the trainer. The trainer should convey that there is no single right or wrong solution to the case, but many possible solutions depending on the assumptions and interpretations made by the trainees. The value of the case approach is the trainees' application of known concepts and principles and the discovery of new ones. The solutions are not as important as the appropriateness with which principles are applied and the logic with which solutions are developed.
ROLE PLAY.
The role play is a simulation of a single event or situation. Trainees who are actors in the role play are provided with a general description of the situation, a description of their roles (e.g., their objectives, emotions, and concerns) and the problem they face.
Role plays differ in the amount of structure they provide to the actors. A structured role play provides trainees with a great deal of detail about the situation that has brought the characters together. It also provides in greater detail each character's attitudes, needs, opinions, and so on. Structured role plays may even provide a scripted dialog between the characters. This type of role play is used primarily to develop and practice interpersonal skills such as communication, conflict resolution, and group decision making. Spontaneous role plays are loosely constructed scenarios in which one trainee plays herself while others play people that the trainee has interacted with in the past (or will in the future). The objective of this type of role play is to develop insight into one's own behavior and its impact on others. How much structure is appropriate in the scenario will depend on the learning objectives.
Whether structured or spontaneous, role plays may also differ based on the number of trainees involved. Single, multiple, and role-rotation formats provide for more or less participation in the role play. In a single role play, one group of trainees role plays while the rest of the trainees observe. While observing, other trainees analyze the interactions and identify learning points. This provides a single focus for trainees and allows for feedback from the trainer. This approach may cause the role players to be embarrassed at being the center of attention, leading to failure to play the roles in an appropriate manner. It also has the drawback of not permitting the role players to observe others perform the roles. Having non-trainees act out the role play may eliminate these problems, but adds some cost to the training.
In a multiple role play, all trainees are formed into groups. Each group acts out the scenario simultaneously. At the conclusion, each group analyzes what happened and identifies learning points. The groups may then report a summary of their learning to the other groups, followed by a general discussion. This allows greater learning as each group will have played the roles somewhat differently. Multiple role plays allow everyone to experience the role play in a short amount of time, but may reduce the quality of feedback. The trainer will not be able to observe all groups at once, and trainees are usually reluctant to provide constructive feedback to their peers. In addition, trainees may not have the experience or expertise to provide effective feedback. To overcome this problem, video tapes of the role plays can be used by the trainee and/or trainer for evaluation.
The role-rotation method begins as either a single or multiple role play. However, when the trainees have interacted for a period of time, the role play is stopped. Observers then discuss what has happened so far and what can be learned from it. After the discussion, the role play resumes with different trainees picking up the roles from some, or all, of the characters. Role rotation demonstrates the variety of ways the issues in the role play may be handled. Trainees who are observers are more active than in the single role play since they have already participated or know they soon will be participating. A drawback is that the progress of the role play is frequently interrupted, creating additional artificiality. Again, trainees may be inhibited from publicly critiquing the behavior of their fellow trainees.
BEHAVIOR MODELING.
Behavior modeling is used primarily for skill building and almost always in combination with some other technique. Interpersonal skills, sales techniques, interviewee and interviewer behavior, and safety procedures are among the many types of skills that have been successfully learned using this method. While live models can be used, it is more typical to video tape the desired behavior for use in training. The steps in behavior modeling can be summarized as follows:
1.   Define the key skill deficiencies
2.   Provide a brief overview of relevant theory
3.   Specify key learning points and critical behaviors to watch for
4.   Have an expert model the appropriate behaviors
5.   Have trainees practice the appropriate behaviors in a structured role play
6.   Have the trainer and other trainees provide reinforcement for appropriate imitation of the model's behavior
Behavior modeling differs from role plays and games by providing the trainee with an example of what the desired behavior looks like prior to attempting the behavior. While this method is primarily behavioral, steps 2 and 3 reflect the cognitively oriented learning features of the technique. Feedback to the trainee is especially powerful when video is used to record both the model's and the trainee's performance. Through split screen devices, the performance of the model and the trainee can be shown side by side. This allows the trainee to clearly see where improvements are needed.
Simulations are not good at developing declarative knowledge. Some initial level of declarative and procedural knowledge is necessary before a simulation can be used effectively. Although some knowledge development can occur in simulations, usually other methods are required for this type of learning. Simulations provide a context in which this knowledge is applied. Improving the trainees' ability to apply knowledge (i.e., facts, procedures, strategies) is the focus of simulations. Simulations do a good job of developing skills because they:
•   simulate the important conditions and situations that occur on the job
•   allow the trainee to practice the skill
•   provide feedback about the appropriateness of their actions
Each of the different formats has particular types of skills for which they are more appropriate:
•   Mechanical, machine operation, and tool-usage skills are best learned through use of equipment simulators.
•   Business decision-making skills (both day to day and strategic), planning, and complex problem solving can be effectively learned through the use of business games.
•   The in-basket technique is best suited to development of strategic knowledge used in making day-to-day decisions.
•   Case studies are most appropriate for developing analytic skills, higher-level principles, and complex problem-solving strategies. Because trainees do not actually implement their decision/solution, its focus is more on what to do (strategic knowledge) than on how to get it done (skills).
•   Role plays provide a good vehicle for developing interpersonal skills and personal insight, allowing trainees to practice interacting with others and receiving feedback. They are an especially effective technique for creating attitude change, allowing trainees to experience their feelings about their behavior and others' reactions to it.
ON-THE-JOB TRAINING
The most common method of training, on-the-job training (OJT) uses more experienced and skilled employees to train less skilled and experienced employees. OJT takes many forms and can be supplemented with classroom training. Included within OJT are the job-instruction technique, apprenticeships, coaching, and mentoring. Formal OJT programs are typically conducted by employees who can effectively use one-on-one instructional techniques and who have superior technical knowledge and skills. Since conducting one-on-one training is not a skill most people develop on their own, train-the-trainer training is required for OJT trainers. In addition to training the trainers, formal OJT programs should carefully develop a sequence of learning events for trainees. The formalized instructional process that is most commonly used is called the job-instruction technique.
JOB-INSTRUCTION TECHNIQUE (JIT).
The JIT was developed during World War II and is still one of the best techniques for implementation of OJT nearly forty years later. It focuses on skill development, although there are usually some factual and procedural-knowledge objectives as well. There are four steps in the JIT process: prepare, present, try out and follow up.
Prepare. Preparation and follow up are the two areas that are most often ignored in OJT programs. Preparation should include a written breakdown of the job. Ignoring this step will prevent the trainer from seeing the job through the eyes of the trainee. When the trainer is very skilled there are many things he does on the job without thinking about them. This can result in their being overlooked in training without a systematic analysis and documentation of the job tasks prior to beginning training.
Once the tasks have been documented, the trainer must prepare an instructional plan. Here, the trainer must determine what the trainee currently knows and does not know. This is the needs analysis phase of Figure 1. Interviewing the trainee, checking personnel records and previous training completed are among the many ways of determining what KSAs the trainee currently has. This is compared to the KSAs the trainee needs to perform the tasks. The instructional plan is then completed focusing on the trainee's KSA deficiencies.
Immediately prior to the training, the trainee should be provided with an orientation to the OJT/JIT learning process. The orientation should help trainees understand their role and the role of the trainer. The importance of listening effectively and feeling comfortable asking questions should be emphasized. The trainee should become familiar with the steps in the JIT process so he or she knows what to expect and when it will occur.
Present. In this stage of JIT there are four activities: tell, show, demonstrate, and explain. When telling and showing, the trainer provides an overview of the job while showing the trainee the different aspects of it. The trainer is not actually doing the job, but pointing out important items such as where levers are located, where materials are stored, and so on. The trainer then demonstrates how to do the job, explaining why it is done that particular way and emphasizing key learning points and important safety instructions. The components of the job should be covered one at a time, and in the order they would normally occur while performing the job.
Try Out. The trainee should be able to explain to the trainer how to do the job prior to actually trying to do the job. This provides a safe transition from watching and listening to doing. When the trainee first tries out the job the trainer should consider any errors to be a function of the training, not the trainee's learning ability. When errors are made they should be used to allow the trainee to learn what not to do and why. The trainer can facilitate this by questioning the trainee about his actions and guiding him or her in identifying the correct procedures.
Follow Up. During follow up the trainer should check the trainees' work often enough to prevent incorrect or bad work habits from developing. The trainer should also reassure the trainee that it is important to ask for help during these initial solo efforts. As trainees demonstrate proficiency in the job, progress checks can taper off until eventually they are eliminated.
APPRENTICESHIP TRAINING.
Apprenticeship training dates back to the Middle Ages, when skilled craftsmen passed on their knowledge to others as a way of preserving the guilds. Today, apprenticeship programs are partnerships between labor unions, employers, schools, and the government. They are most often found in the skilled trades and professional unions such as boiler engineers, electrical workers, pipe fitters, and carpenters. The typical apprenticeship program requires two years of on-the-job experience and about 180 hours of classroom instruction, though requirements vary. An apprentice must be able to demonstrate mastery of all required skills and knowledge before being allowed to graduate to journeyman status. This is documented through testing and certification processes. Journeymen provide the on-the-job training, while adult education centers and community colleges typically provide the classroom training. Formal apprenticeship programs are regulated by governmental agencies that also set standards and provide services.
COACHING.
Coaching is a process of providing one-on-one guidance and instruction to improve the work performance of the person being coached in a specific area. It differs from other OJT methods in that the trainee already has been working at the job for some time. Usually, coaching is directed at employees with performance deficiencies, but it can also serve as a motivational tool for those performing adequately. Typically the supervisor acts as the coach. Like the OJT trainer, the coach must be skilled both in how to perform the task(s) and how to train others to do them. The amount of time supervisors devote to coaching activities steadily increased during the 1990s and will likely represent more than 50 percent of supervisors' time by the new millennium.
The coaching process, viewed from the coach's perspective, generally follows the outline below. Note the similarities between JIT and this process.
1.   Understand the trainee's job, the KSAs and resources required to meet performance expectations, and the trainee's current level of performance.
2.   Meet with the trainee and mutually agree on the performance objectives to be achieved.
3.   Mutually arrive at a plan/schedule for achieving the performance objectives.
4.   At the work site, show the trainee how to achieve the objectives, observe the trainee's performance, then provide feedback.
5.   Repeat step 4 until performance improves.
MENTORING.
pararing is a form of coaching in which an ongoing relationship is developed between a senior and junior employee. This technique focuses on providing the junior employee with political guidance and a clear understanding of how the organization goes about its business. Mentoring is more concerned with improving the employee's fit within the organization than improving technical aspects of performance, thus differentiating it from coaching. Generally, though not always, mentors are only provided for management-level employees.  

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