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Immigration Issues/Just filed I485 and got dream job offer overseas

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Question
Hi, Mr. Arora,

First of all, I appreciate your kind help.
I just filed I 130 and I-485 after I married to a US Citizen.  I live in Texas and applied for Pilot(DORA). A few days later, I got a dream job offer from a US major bank in overseas and they ask me to start within a month.  My husband is supportive and may join me in Asia later.
1. What will be the best way to handle this situation?  I do not want to screw my status and do want to visit US and see my husband time to time.  
2. If I withdraw my I485 in TX and reapply in Asia, would it be OK?
3. Should I go ahead and apply for advanced parole?
4. Should I ask the bank to wait until I get Green Card that will take less than 90 days?
5.After I receive a green card within 90days (DORA) and apply for reentry permit, can I leave US before I received the reentry permit and ask USCIS to forward it to address in Asia?

I thank you so much for your time.


Answer
Hi Jenny,

If you depart the U.S. without being granted either conditional or permanent resident status, or without advance parole document, you will be considered to have abandoned the I-485 application.

If you must leave, say, this week or next week, you can (after the I-130 has been approved by the USCIS) apply at a U.S. Consulate in Asia for consular processing in lieu of I-485 if you wish. There is no need to withdraw the I-485 before departing the U.S. (it will be automatically withdrawn anyway unless one of the conditions noted in the first paragraph of my response is met).

It is your personal decision as to how important this job is for you. I cannot determine for you if you should wait until either I-485 is approved, or until advance parole document is issued, before departing the U.S.

Reentry permit does not apply to you as you must be a permanent resident in order to apply for reentry permit. For instance, if you are a permanent resident and you believe that you will be outside the U.S. between one to two years continuously, please apply for reentry permit. Some attorneys (such as myself) recommend applying for a reentry permit even if the continuous absence from the U.S. will be for as few as six months. Again, you must be a permanent resident to apply for reentry permit.

Regards,
Ajay K. Arora, Esq.
www.h1b1.com

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Ajay K. Arora

Expertise

I can answer your questions on employment and family-based U.S. Immigration Law. Expertise in various immigration categories includes the following: H-1B, L-1, O-1, PERM (labor certification), EB-1 to EB-3 I-140 employment-based immigrant petitions, family or fiance(e) or spousal sponsorship, visa extension or change of status, adjustment of status, naturalization (citizenship), etc.

Experience

Ajay K. Arora attended Pennsylvania State University and the University of Wales at Swansea (United Kingdom), and earned his law degree at Temple University School of Law, Philadelphia, in 1993. Mr. Arora has practiced Immigration Law since graduation and is a member of the American Immigration Lawyers Association since 1995.

Organizations
American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) full member since 1995.

Education/Credentials
Ajay K. Arora attended Pennsylvania State University and the University of Wales at Swansea (United Kingdom), and earned his law degree at Temple University School of Law, Philadelphia, in 1993. Mr. Arora has practiced Immigration Law since graduation and is a member of the American Immigration Lawyers Association since 1995.

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