Industrial Health and Safety/ladder-related injuries

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Problem Statement
Problem Statement  
Hello Mr. Brown my name is Ethan Andow and I am a student at Chapin High School located in El Paso, Texas doing a project for engineering that is very imperative to my graduation. I was wondering if you would be able to assist me through the duration of the project, giving me feedback and help? My problem that I am hoping to solve is ladder-related injuries.

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Subject: ladder-related injuries

Question: Hello Mr. Brown my name is Ethan Andow and I am a student at Chapin High School located in El Paso, Texas doing a project for engineering that is very imperative to my graduation. I was wondering if you would be able to assist me through the duration of the project, giving me feedback and help. My problem that I am hoping to solve is ladder-related injuries.

Answer: Normally we are not supposed to help with homework questions but I will offer some suggestions as to where to go to start. The first place to go would be a search of the internet for terms such as “ladder safety”, “fixed ladder safety”,” portable ladder safety” and so on.  You will find resources such as https://safetyresourcesblog.files.wordpress.com/2014/08/ladder-safety-manual-presentation1.pdf. Then I would move on to the sites for ladder products such as Werner ladders (fiber glass ladders which are the ones used by most safety minded industries despite the higher costs. (Wood ladders are excellent for fires. Aluminum ladders are fun to run over with lift trucks like popping bubble wrap – the first things to do in a ladder safety program.) Next I would go to the web sites the federal and state compliance – OSHA, CALOSHA, OROSHA, and others. Just because they don’t work in your state – they can still be an excellent resource.   They will have much material. The same applies for the large insurance carriers at least those involved with worker’s compensation. There are many agencies that keep accident/injury statistics. In many cases ladder accidents are included in the “falls – different levels”. My last comment is that like most accidents one of the key components is people doing “stupid” things. This leads to proper training and warning signs, etc. Does everyone read and understand signs and instructions in English?  The reason most instructions for products today come in multiple languages.

Reducing injuries due to ladders (falls from different levels) also leads to the effort to eliminate the use of ladders where possible. We used lifts in our maintenance departments. In operating areas valves, etc. were moved so climbing was not necessary.

My intention in responding to question was to suggest some approaches and sources for assistance with your project. I think this will point you in some productive directions. I wish you the very best in your project.

Michael Brown, CSP Retired

Industrial Health and Safety

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Michael Brown, CSP Retired

Expertise

I can discuss issues relating to the successful integration of comprehensive occupational safety and health practices into the successful operation of a manufacturing facility including production, quality and maintenance functions. My emphasis has been on supervisory training and the development of goals and measurement processes along with high levels of employee involvement. I always stressed the cost of accidents and their negative impact on the financial stability of operating units.

Experience

I worked in manufacturing/production (primarily forest products) in excess of twenty years. In my last employment (before retirement due to a stroke) I was responsible for the safety and health function for a division which had approximately 20 plants ranging from 25 employees to 600 employees. I interfaced with the safety staff at the locations and the managers and supervisors. I also worked with the support personnel including timber operations the headquarters staff and a flight department.

Organizations
American Society of Safety Engineers (Professional, Emeritus) Board of Certified Safety Professionals (CSP, Retired)

Education/Credentials
BS in Forest Engineering from Oregon State University, some graduate work at Portland State University in Public Health, a graduate of the Oregon Basic Police Academy and Certified Safety Professional (by examination). Various seminars, professional development conferences and classes throughout career.

Awards and Honors
See current ratings for AllExperts in the subject of “Occupational (OSHA) and Environmental Hazards”

Past/Present Clients
See current ratings for AllExperts in the subject of “Occupational (OSHA) and Environmental Hazards”

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