Interspecies Conflict/None

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Question
I have often seen many experts, (including you) mentioning that a Bully Kutta or a Tosa can defeat a honey badger. But I still need some information on that.
Also I saw a video in which a leopard had great difficulty in killing an old ratel, about an hour! According to the person who uploaded it. (youtube)
Despite the fact that the leopard was a wild one. Plus animals that are wild are pound for pound tougher than those who are domestic because a wild animal has to do everything itself but a domestic animal is spoon-fed. Plus both mustelids have sharp claws as well as strong jaws/biting power. Their hides are also quite tough (particularly that of the ratel, which I read was difficult to kill even with a spear!) My first match ups are about ratel and wolverines. On the dogís side however I must mention that the Bully Kutta has a truly strong bite force and physique. I remember my Bully Kutta, even though was a slight mix with Gull Terr was able to crush hard clay pots when he was a year old. The pure Bully we have today, being of only 11 months is strong enough to nearly drag my cousin (who is the strongest member in our entire family) on the leash during his daily walk. And our present Bully is that of a lighter variant known as the Nagi Bully. And the heavier variants are definitely even more thick boned and strong. To end this, Iíd say that the ratel and the mustelids have great arsenal and durability and the dog has one extreme weapon (its jaws) and possibly, has a much greater body strength. Moreover, the Spanish fighting bull is a tough adversary for any wild animal. So possibly, a Bully Kutta is a force to reckon with.
So can you explain the first 2 fights in detail?

1.   Game bred/trained Bully Kutta vs Wolverine


2.   Game bred/trained Bully Kutta vs Ratel

3.   Game bred/trained Bully Kutta vs Olive baboon


4.   Tiger shark vs Hippopotamus


5.   Tiger shark vs Polar Bear

6.   Southern elephant seal vs Walrus

7.   Gray Wolf vs Bully Kutta

8.   Rhesus Macaque vs Gull Terr

9.   Ratel vs Olive baboon

10.   Clouded Leopard vs Chimpanzee

11.   Leopard vs Sloth bear


According to my view, the saltwater croc HAS a hard biting force but I think the bite force of a hippo, Killer whale or sperm whale could be even bigger. Especially that of a hippopotamus. I remember that when Brady Barr measured the bite force of a female hippo, it was 1800lbs. However, I remember he even mentioned that the hippo didnít bite it hardly. With that, we can actually guess the bite force of an enraged male hippo.
12.   Guinea baboon vs ratel

13.   Saltwater croc vs Great white shark (in detail)

14.   Chacma baboon vs Spotted Hyena

15.   Olive baboon vs Clouded Leopard

16.   Bengal Tiger vs Marsupial Lion

17.   Leopard Seal vs tiger shark


18.   Presa Canario vs Tosa

19.   African Elephant vs Dinohyus

20.   Dinohyus vs Helloid 


21.   Bull shark vs Jaguar

22.   Elephant Seal vs Elephant


23.   Warthog vs Gorilla

24.   Sun Bear vs Wolverine

25.   Sun bear vs Bully Kutta

26.   Main event:  Leopard Seal vs Grizzly bear

Thanks a lot!

Answer
Hello Jem.  Good to hear from you again.


Q: I have often seen many experts, (including you) mentioning that a Bully Kutta or a Tosa can defeat a honey badger. But I still need some information on that.
Also I saw a video in which a leopard had great difficulty in killing an old ratel, about an hour! According to the person who uploaded it. (youtube)
Despite the fact that the leopard was a wild one. Plus animals that are wild are pound for pound tougher than those who are domestic because a wild animal has to do everything itself but a domestic animal is spoon-fed. Plus both mustelids have sharp claws as well as strong jaws/biting power. Their hides are also quite tough (particularly that of the ratel, which I read was difficult to kill even with a spear!) My first match ups are about ratel and wolverines. On the dogís side however I must mention that the Bully Kutta has a truly strong bite force and physique. I remember my Bully Kutta, even though was a slight mix with Gull Terr was able to crush hard clay pots when he was a year old. The pure Bully we have today, being of only 11 months is strong enough to nearly drag my cousin (who is the strongest member in our entire family) on the leash during his daily walk. And our present Bully is that of a lighter variant known as the Nagi Bully. And the heavier variants are definitely even more thick boned and strong. To end this, Iíd say that the ratel and the mustelids have great arsenal and durability and the dog has one extreme weapon (its jaws) and possibly, has a much greater body strength. Moreover, the Spanish fighting bull is a tough adversary for any wild animal. So possibly, a Bully Kutta is a force to reckon with.
So can you explain the first 2 fights in detail?
A: The skin around a ratel's neck can be very thick, and this will make it difficult to asphyxiate it with a throat bite.  Big cats (like leopards) typically kill with a suffocating throat bite, but canids typically kill by inducing tissue damage and blood loss (by biting and shaking or biting and pulling).  A leopard has a specific killing technique, and it's probably not going to claw a ratel to death.  A Bully Kutta is large and powerful, and it will be able to eventually breach the ratel's hide in certain areas (like the head and face or limbs) and wear it down.  With the dog's jaws clamped upon it, the ratel's ability to effectively counter-attack will be limited.  The Bully Kutta's ability to injure and dispatch the ratel will be greater than the ratel's ability to injure and dispatch the Bully Kutta.  The Bully Kutta's agility and greater lateral quickness (longer legs) will give it the ability to apply its offense where it wants to, but the suppleness and ferocity of either mustelid (ratel or wolverine) will make it hard to control once contact is made.  The Bully Kutta (and the Tosa) have too much size and power not to be favored.  I certainly agree that being wild gives an animal an advantage in most situations (a 7kg bobcat will wipe the floor with a 7kg domestic cat), but if a domestic animal is specifically trained to be a fighter, it can be enough to bring it up to or beyond the advantage of "being wild" enjoyed by a wild animal.  Following up with your example, a Spanish fighting bull is bred to fight (and males fight all the time when grouped together in a pasture), and I consider it a match for a Cape buffalo (which, of course, is wild) at close weights.  An animal being wild doesn't always grant it "better fighter" status, but it does mean that the animal is adaptable and experienced at doing what it takes to survive.


1. Game bred/trained Bully Kutta vs Wolverine: The Bully Kutta can weigh more than 4 wolverines.  The Bully Kutta would rush in to latch onto the wolverine with its jaws, and the wolverine would likely use its powerful paws to cling to the dog (or claw it) and bite strongly with its sharp teeth.   A wolverine can defeat most animals in its weight range and is capable of killing prey items much larger than itself, but it will have trouble dealing with another predatory animal with the physical attributes the Bully Kutta brings to the table.  Killing a moose or an elk slowed down by snow is an impressive feat for the wolverine, but these herbivores won't be able to put the wolverine in the same type of danger as an aggressive canine with better lateral quickness and a strong determination to attack.  A wolverine can chase bears and wolves away from kills on occasion, but this isn't because the wolverine can physically overpower these stronger predators but because these predators decide it's not worth the effort considering what is at stake.  A gray wolf is capable of killing a wolverine, but because a wolf will shy away from a dangerous conflict unless it's necessary to engage in one, the wolf will often back away.  A trained Bully Kutta will attack without reservation and apply a great deal of pressure on the wolverine with its large bite and strong movements.  A wolverine is brutally strong for its size (among the top among mammals pound-for-pound), but its absolute strength will be considerablely less than the strength of a 77kg Bully Kutta.  Not an easy fight for the Bully Kutta, but its massive size advantage will give it the victory most of the time.  Bully Kutta wins.  For addition information that might interest you, check out "varied" from 10/26/13.

2. Game bred/trained Bully Kutta vs Ratel: The Bully Kutta can weigh 5 times as much as a large ratel (honey badger).  A trained Bully Kutta will rush in to clamp its jaws on the ratel and attempt to puncture or rip the mustelid's hide by shaking, pulling, or biting repeatedly.  The ratel's thick skin is incredibly resistant to injury, but the violence of the canid's attack will potentially cause damage to less-protected areas (head, limbs) and perhaps internal body systems.  The ratel won't be able to freely bite and claw in self-defense because the range of its movements will depend on where the Bully Kutta's jaws latch on.  The ratel is probably tougher to kill than a wolverine because of its very tough skin, but it's offense isn't as powerful as the larger mustelid's.  The ratel will put up a fierce fight to defend itself, but there's not a lot it will be able to do offensively to a significant degree to injure and disable the much larger dog.  It may take a while, but the Bully Kutta will prevail most of the time.  

3. Game bred/trained Bully Kutta vs Olive baboon: The Bully Kutta can weigh over twice as much as an olive baboon.  Olive baboons are very dangerous primates.  They have good mobility and leaping ability, and their grabbing hands and sharp upper canines (5cm long) aid them in conflicts.  A Bully Kutta trained to attack won't use the same caution and discernment than many animals in Africa do (leopards, cheetahs, etc.) when dealing with baboons, and will likely rush in quickly to land a bite.  The offense of an olive baboon (quick, damaging bites)is greater than that of a wolverine or a honey badger due to its greater size & mobility, but its ability to take damage is much less.  The Bully Kutta will be able to kill the baboon with its jaws and powerful movements, but it will likely receive many deep puncture wounds in the process.  It's certainly possible for the baboon to inflict enough injury in a short amount of time to overcome the Bully Kutta before it succumbs itself, but on most occasions the dog will be the victor.  Edge to Bully Kutta.

4. Tiger shark vs Hippopotamus: The hippo will weigh over 4 times as much as the tiger shark.  A hippo isn't skilled at swimming, and will not have a good chance if it can't touch the bottom.  In shallower water the tiger shark won't have good vertical mobility, and will not have as many opportunities to land a bite before it gets bitten itself.  It's hard to find a water depth fair to both animals.  In shallow water the hippo wins; in deeper water the tiger shark wins.

5. Tiger shark vs Polar Bear: These animals will be reasonably close in weight.  There's not a water depth this fight can take place where each animal is at its strongest (in regards to a "comfort zone"), but shallow water is where the battle will be the closest.  Tiger sharks are aggressive, and are armed with very sharp teeth that can cause a lot of damage in a single bite.  Polar bears are great swimmers, but can't utilize their tremendous strength if they can't touch bottom.  A polar bear can snatch 225kg seals out of the water, but doing this against a shark close to its own weight will be very difficult.  The scales of the shark will help protect it from the bear's offense (clawing and biting), but the bear can eventually get through if it's determined.  If the water is deep enough to allow the tiger shark to swim freely, it will be too deep for the polar bear to operate optimally (and the shark will be favored).  If the water is shallow enough for the bear to move about unimpeded and make effective use of its weaponry, the tiger shark will be limited in its ability to move around (and the bear will be favored).  Even in shallow water that limits the shark's movements, the bear will need to exercise caution because its efforts to gnaw & claw through the shark's scales will leave it vulnerable to a bite if the fish decides to thrash or make sudden movements with its head.  Overall edge to the tiger shark.  

6. Southern elephant seal vs Walrus: A Southern elephant seal can weigh over twice as much as a walrus.  Even though the walrus is smaller, it is better equipped for this battle (presence of 1m tusks and extremely tough hide).  The walrus often has to defend itself from polar bears, and does so by stabbing with its tusks.  Elephant seals battle one another by posturing up and thrusting forward with their upper bodies to deliver bites.  These battles can be bloody.  The elephant seal's bite will cause minimal damage to the walrus without great accumulation (due to the walrus' hide), but the tusks of the walrus can seriously injure the elephant seal if they impale its body.  The walrus will have a maneuverability advantage in the water as well.  A walrus will very likely give way to the larger animal in a realistic encounter (especially on land), but in a serious battle the tusked pinniped will have the advantage due primarily to tusk usage.  Slight edge to walrus.   

7. Gray Wolf vs Bully Kutta: A Bully Kutta can weigh 30% more than a gray wolf.  Both of these animals will have good mobility, endurance, and strong bites.  A grey wolf will have a larger bite force.  Grey wolves are great hunters and can bring down large herbivores (elk, moose, etc.) as a group.  They occasionally engage in conflicts with other wild animals (bears, wolverines, pumas, etc.) depending on where they're from, but will usually shy away from a dangerous fight unless something important is at stake.  A wolf is not as confident in a solo conflict than one in which it has help from the pack.  A trained Bully Kutta will be more accustomed to one-on-one combat with another canid than the gray wolf will (and this is a key factor in this fight), and its size advantage will add to its chances.  Even though the wolf is "wild" and must be granted certain advantages (toughness, survival instinct, etc.) because of this, the Bully Kutta's training can't be discounted.  If the Bully Kutta is not a trained one, it will lose.  Realistically the Bully Kutta will chase the wolf away.  The gray wolf will win at close weights, but the sizes assigned here make for an interesting battle.  Close to 50/50.

8. Rhesus Macaque vs Gull Terr: A Gull Terr can weigh over 4 times as much as a large rhesus macaque.  The rhesus macaque has mobility, use of hands, and sharp teeth that will aid it in a confrontation, but will have a great deal of trouble utilizing these assets once a determined Gull Terr is set loose upon it.  The Gull Terr is a combination of stamina, intensity, and relentlessness housed in a body with great agility and a strong bite force.  The body of the macaque won't withstand the assault of a formidable dog several times heavier than it is.  Gull Terr wins.

9. Ratel vs Olive baboon: The olive baboon will weigh almost 2 1/2 times as much as the ratel.  The ratel will have advantages of much tougher skin and the presence of sharp claws (great for digging), and its bite is strong.  The olive baboon will have advantages of mobility, grabbing hands, and a very damaging bite (5cm upper canines).  The ratel's hide will hold up against the baboon's teeth better than the baboon's hide will hold up against the ratel's jaws and claws, but the better mobility of the baboon will give it the ability to avoid injury while inflicting some of its own.  At closer sizes I would easily favor the ratel, but an olive baboon over twice the ratel's weight will be too powerful.  Olive baboons can be a handful for larger predators, and ratel is more skilled at attacking large reptiles than it is large mammals.  Edge to olive baboon.

10. Clouded Leopard vs Chimpanzee: The chimpanzee will weigh over 2 1/2 times as much as the clouded leopard.  Clouded leopards are extremely agile, and have strong jaws armed with upper canines as long as matchsticks (almost like a miniature, less-stocky version of a saber-tooth cat).  The clouded leopard can use its quickness and front limbs to position an opponent for the delivery of a killing bite.  Most of the larger prey items a clouded leopard tackles (cervids) can't battle back well once the cat gets into a good biting position, but the chimpanzee will have hand usage to help it a bit more at close quarters.  A clouded leopard can certainly kill a chimpanzee with a well-executed ambush, but face-to-face will be a steeper challenge for the felid.  Chimpanzees usually don't engage in one-on-one battles with an animal of another species (typically use bluffing and intimidation tactics with the help of troop members), but one will be large and strong enough to repel a clouded leopard on most occasions.  Chimpanzee wins.

11. Leopard vs Sloth bear: A sloth bear can be double the weight of a leopard.  Sloth bears can be aggressive, and have long (3") foreclaws that can cause serious injury to an attacker.  Leopards are powerful and well-armed (jaws & claws), but they aren't going to have a great showing against a bear of this size.  Sloth bears occasionally encounter tigers, and have driven them away from time-to-time.  Sloth bear wins.


According to my view, the saltwater croc HAS a hard biting force but I think the bite force of a hippo, Killer whale or sperm whale could be even bigger. Especially that of a hippopotamus. I remember that when Brady Barr measured the bite force of a female hippo, it was 1800lbs. However, I remember he even mentioned that the hippo didnít bite it hardly. With that, we can actually guess the bite force of an enraged male hippo.
Comment: I remember seeing that segment with Brady Barr and the hippo.  It's likely that in the case of a hippo and a sperm whale the bite force is great due to their great size.  A hippo the same size as a crocodile won't have the same bite force, but one weighing 2 or 3 times as much might easily be comparable in that department.  A lot of it is what the animal needs to do with its bite.  Hippos and sperm whales don't need to crush bone or anything else that requires a bite force (as compared to its body weight) as a crocodile does.  A crocodile needs a tremendous bite force to clamp onto struggling prey (its teeth are made to grip), and a killer whale uses its teeth to hold and tear prey items of great size at times (meaning it probably has a substantial bite force).  The killer whale doesn't need to have a bite force as great as a crocodile because of how each animal uses its jaws, but the sheer size of the orca (several times as heavy as a crocodile) means that a comparable bite force can't be counted out.  A Komodo dragon doesn't need a strong bite force (its sharp teeth can easily tear flesh), but a spotted hyena does (it crushes bones with its jaws).  It's primary about jaw usage, but size plays a factor.  I agree that it's quite possible a 2-3t hippo might have a bite force that exceeds a crocodile's, and I feel certain that a 6-8t killer whale or a 60t sperm whale does.


12. Guinea baboon vs ratel: The Guinea baboon will weigh about 1/3rd more than the ratel (honey badger).  Ratels are fearless & aggressive, and have strong bites & sharp claws (used mainly for digging).  The hide of the ratel is thick & tough, and protects it from many attacks.  The guinea baboon has good mobility, and has sharp upper canines that are used to bite adversaries with.  The ratel has the advantages of tougher hide (can injure the baboon more readily than the baboon can injure it), teeth & claws as weapons (the baboon only has teeth), and is probably more accustomed to one-on-one conflicts (encounters jackals, leopards, & other African predators) than the baboon (usually seeks safety in numbers).  A guinea baboon with a greater weight advantage might be favored, but at the given weight ratio, the ratel will have enough assets to prevail.  Ratel wins.

13. Saltwater croc vs Great white shark (in detail): The great white shark can be around twice as heavy as the crocodile.  In open water, the shark will have greater mobility, and will have a better chance to land a bite.  The bites of each animal will do different things, and their hides are different as well.  A shark's bite is meant to slice, and a crocodile's bite is to grab & hold (they mainly kill by drowning).  The hide of the crocodile is largely covered by osteoderms (bony plates), but there are some areas on a crocodile's body that can be readily breached by the razor-sharp teeth of the shark.  Sharks have tough hide as well, and their rotund bodies would make it hard for the crocodile to hold on tight because of the wide gape that would be required.  The crocodile can attack a fin, and a nose bite might be effective, but the shark will have better success in a bite war.  Crocodiles are often shown dominating an encounter at the water's edge in shallow water, but this is against a terrestrial animal that is out of its element and struggling to escape.  A crocodile won't have the same success against an aquatic animal that is more at home in the aquatic fighting arena.  A shark isn't a great face-to-face fighter (prefers to bite & retreat so the victim can bleed out) and will avoid a direct conflict with an animal that can hurt it.  At equal weights I would favor a crocodile in shallow water (because the shark often relies on vertical mobility when it attacks) and the shark in deeper water (due to better mobility).  At the given weights, the shark is too large.  Great white shark wins.

14. Chacma baboon vs Spotted Hyena: A big chacma baboon will weigh about 60% of a spotted hyena's weight.  The baboon will have an advantage in mobility, and a well-placed bite with its long upper canines can injure the hyena.  Spotted hyenas are durable, however, and it will likely take several bites from the baboon to slow it down.  The baboon won't be strong enough to prevent the larger hyena from seizing it in its powerful jaws (and will have difficulty counter-attacking once this happens).  Realistically a spotted hyena will give a large baboon a wide berth, but will have the arsenal to defeat one in a serious fight.  A baboon can compete with a hyena if the weights are close, but the spotted hyena is simply too big for the chacma.  Spotted hyena wins.

15. Olive baboon vs Clouded Leopard: The olive baboon will weigh about 65% more than the clouded leopard.  Both of these animals have good mobility, and both possess dangerous bites with long, upper canines.  The clouded leopard has the advantages of agility, quickness, bite force, claws, and a know-how of finishing an opponent with a precisely-placed bite.  The baboon will attempt to bite and stab with its teeth anywhere it can, and will use its size advantage and grabbing hands to help control the positioning of the fight.  Baboons will occasionally drive larger African leopards away.  At closer weights I would favor the cat, but the baboon is a little too big here.  Olive baboon wins.

16. Bengal Tiger vs Marsupial Lion: A Bengal tiger can weigh twice as much as a marsupial lion (Thylacoleo).  Tigers are amazing hunters, and can overpower buffalo and other large animals with ambush.  The marsupial lion was a very stocky creature with a powerful bite force and the ability to overpower animals larger than itself by employing its damaging bite.  The marsupial lion will be favored at parity against most other animals (including a tiger), but it won't be able to control positioning against a tiger twice its own size.  The Bengal tiger will prevail more times than not.  Edge to Bengal tiger.

17. Leopard Seal vs tiger shark:: The tiger shark will weigh almost twice the seal's weight.  The seal will have a mobility advantage, and can avoid the shark's attack by swimming around it and staying out of range.  Seals can out-maneuver sharks, but they can't swim faster in one direction.  In order for the leopard seal to subdue the shark, it will have to attack it with many bites over a period of time.  This will put the seal in danger of getting bit (the shark can make short, quick movements).  Tiger shark wins.

18. Presa Canario vs Tosa: Tosas have varying weights; some will outweigh the Presa Canario and some will not.  Presa Canarios are solidly-built canids with large heads and muscular bodies (especially in the front).  Tosas are highly-skilled fighters that can be trained to "wrestle" an opponent into a compromising position, but will bite if bitten.  A large Tosa might not be a good representation of the breed in regards to fighting prowess, and might not be able to defeat every Presa that comes along.  If we consider a parity weight that will give us a good weight for each dog (about 60kg), the Tosa will have the edge more times than not.  Both of these dogs are near the top among canine combatants.  Sometimes one will win, sometimes the other one will win.  Edge to Tosa.  

19. African Elephant vs Dinohyus: An African elephant can weigh over 6 tons and stand over 3 1/2 meters at the shoulder.  It will weigh at least 6 times more than the Dinohyus (Daeodon).  Dinohyus resembled a giant warthog (but the size of a bison), and had tusks to slash with and a huge set of jaws to deliver a bone-crushing bite.  Although the Dinohyus will have the lateral quickness to stay out of the way of the much more powerful elephant, it will be in serious risk of getting gored or trampled if it actually attempts to engage the pachyderm.  The size difference is simply too great.  African elephant wins.

20. Dinohyus vs Helloid: Dinohyus (Daeodon) will weigh 4 times as much as Helloid (fantasy animal that is similar to a giant wolverine).  Helloid is a powerful combatant with its toughness and weaponry, but it will have a hard time dealing with this huge, charging animal with a big bite and sharp tusks.  Helloid can't be counted out because it has dangerous teeth and claws (and a potent bite-force), but it's giving up a lot of size here.  Dinohyus wins.

21. Bull shark vs Jaguar: The bull shark can weigh anywhere from 2/3 more to over twice as heavy as a jaguar.  In shallow water the bull shark won't have great mobility and the jaguar (which will attack caiman in shallow water) will have a chance to leap upon it and deliver a bite to its head area.  A jaguar is among the strongest of all cats pound-for-pound, and its large jaws can exert tremendous pressure.  The jaguar's claws will help it get the position it wants, and it can kill the shark if the weight difference isn't too great.  If the water is deep enough for the bull shark to move around reasonably well, it will be a very dangerous challenge for the jaguar (the cat will be impeded by the water depth).  A bull shark's bite can create a large avulsion in the cat's body, and it will be hard to control if its weight is much greater.  Slight edge to the jaguar in very shallow water, but the bull shark will be favored once the water depth allows it to move around well.  Overall edge to bull shark.

22. Elephant Seal vs Elephant: An African elephant can weigh 50% more than a Southern elephant seal.  An elephant seal can posture up to a height almost 2/3 the shoulder height of the elephant.  Male elephant seals engage in bloody battles with one another (to claim a beachfront and the females on it) by raising up and forcefully delivering bites.  An elephant seal's mobility on land is limited, and one would be in trouble there against an African elephant.  Elephants are extremely strong animals with long tusks.  The elephant would be able to inflict injury to the elephant seal much easier than the other way around.  Even in shallow water (maybe 2m) the elephant will be able to move around well enough to repel the seal.  In deep water than impedes the elephant's movements (and ability to apply offense), the more maneuverable elephant seal will have a greater advantage.  The seal won't be able to seriously injure the huge elephant, but will be able to stay out of the pachyderm's way and perhaps deliver a bite here and there to annoy it.  Overall, elephant wins.  

23. Warthog vs Gorilla: A silverback gorilla will weigh about 40% more than a warthog.  Warthogs are nimble suids with long curved tusks.  They are practiced at defending themselves against a variety of predators (lions, leopards, hyenas, African wild dogs), and are capable of inflicting serious injuries on any of them.  Gorillas are very strong animals with long arms and a formidable bite, but they don't have a lot of experience dealing with other animal species in combat situations.  The gorilla has the physical ability to restrain the warthog's movement with its arms (which would be a prudent tactic), but it doesn't have the know-how to employ such a strategy.  The gorilla may try to swing its arms and attempt to grab and bite the warthog, but the more nimble suid will be able to slash at the gorilla with ease.  A maximum-sized gorilla (209kg) might have a decent chance against an average-sized warthog (100kg), but not a maximum-sized one (150kg).  Warthog wins.

24. Sun Bear vs Wolverine: The sunbear will be over 3 times as heavy as the wolverine.  Wolverines are strong, fierce combatants, but the sun bear can match it in weaponry (jaws & claws).  Wolverines can handle themselves against many animals within their weight range and higher, but the sun bear will be large enough to outmatch it.  Sun bear wins.

25. Sun bear vs Bully Kutta: The Bully Kutta will weigh almost 20% more than the sun bear.  Sun bears are the smallest bears (usually not exceeding 65kg), but still have the impressive ursid attributes (strength, endurance, durability).  Their claws are long and sharp, and their skin is tough and loose (which enables them to counter-attack easily when grabbed).  A sun bear won't be eager to participate in a fight with a Bully Kutta, but will aggressively defend itself if it needs to.  The Bully Kutta will rush in to land bites, but will not easily cause damage to the tough bear.  The sun bear's claws can inflict deep wounds to the body of the Bully Kutta, and its jaws can deliver a powerful bite.  having paw usage is an advantage for the bear (the bite is the dog's only weapon), and it should repel the canid more times than not.  Edge to sun bear.

26. Main event:  Leopard Seal vs Grizzly bear: A grizzly bear can weigh about the same as a large leopard seal.  Leopard seal are active, aggressive predators (attacking smaller seals, penguins, squid, etc.) that are armed with formidable jaws and sharp teeth.  Seals don't have great mobility on land, and a leopard seal won't be able to escape from an attacking grizzly bear without water nearby.  The grizzly bear will be able to injure the seal with its claws and apply bites if the encounter is on dry land.  A shallow water will still favor the bear as long as the ursid's movements aren't impeded a great deal because it will have better means to injure the seal than the other way around.  In deep water, however, the result will be different.  Seals have excellent mobility in the water, and a leopard seal would swim circles around a grizzly bear if the water is too deep for the bear to move around easily.  A grizzly bear in deeper water can't apply effective offense (holding, swiping, biting) like it can on land.  It won't be able to prevent the leopard seal from biting it, and probably won't be able to catch it with jaws or claws on most occasions.  Grizzly bear on land or shallow water; leopard seal in deeper water.


Best regards.  

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Questions regarding animal conflicts within realistic or unrealistic settings are welcome; my strength lies in medium-to-large species. Small animals (including birds of prey), prehistoric animals, sea creatures, and domestic dog breeds are usually within my scope, but to a lesser degree. I can't confidently answer hypothetical questions about human vs animal, arachnids, insects, or amphibians, but I am willing to field them nonetheless.

Experience

From a young age, I have been interested in animals. Starting with the original Mutual of Omaha's Wild Kingdom and World Book Encyclopedias, I have seen many animal shows and documentaries and have read multiple books on the subject. I have a solid understanding of the physiology of many animals and interspecies conflict in general.

Education/Credentials
Associate degree in unrelated field; biology classes in college.

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