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Italian Language/"dirigersi" and "dependent prepositions"

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Question
Dear Maria,

My question is about the verb “dirigersi” and about “dependent prepositions”.

Can you please tell me if the verb “dirigersi” must always be followed by either the preposition “a” or the preposition “verso” before a following noun or pronoun.   If this is true, does this mean that “di” or “verso” are the “dependent prepositions for the verb “dirigersi”?

Would it be possible for me to find a list of Italian verbs that have a certain dependent preposition before a noun or pronoun?  I have some lists of Italian verbs with dependent prepositions before an infinitive, but I have not been able to locate such a list for nouns and pronouns.   (I would be more than glad to purchase any text book that would provide this information)

Thank you very much for all of your help.

Sincerely,

Rich

Answer
Dear Rich,

the reflexive pronominal verb “dirigersi” can be followed by either the preposition “a” or the preposition “verso” before a following noun or pronoun.  Thus  both  “a”  and  “verso” are the dependent prepositions for the verb “dirigersi”, though we use more often “verso” instead of “a”.

See for example:”Si diresse a Roma/verso Roma”, “Penso che ci dirigeremo verso casa”, “Dirigiamoci verso/a Sud, non verso/a Nord”, etc.

As for a list of Italian verbs that have a certain dependent preposition before a noun or pronoun, I am sorry, but  there is not such a list in Italian grammar, since you must use the dictionary to find which preposition a verb takes before a noun or pronoun.

Kind regards,
Maria

Italian Language

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Maria

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Italian is my mother tongue and I'll be glad to answer any questions concerning Italian Language.

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Over 25 years teaching experience.

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I received my Ph.D.in Classics (summa cum laude) from Genova University (Italy).

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