Italian Language/translation

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Question
QUESTION: Dear Maria,

Would you please tell me if the following translations are correct or not:

Di chi sei ospite a Roma?
With whom are you a guest in Rome?

Di chi sei stato ospite a Roma?
With whom have you been a guest in Rome?

Di chi sei compagno di scuola?
With whom are you a school friend?

Di chi sei collega in ufficio?
With whom are you a colleague in the office?

Di chi sei innamorato?
With whom are you in love?

Thank you.

Sincerely,

Rich

ANSWER: Dear Rich,

your translations are correct, though I think that you should have used the preposition  “of” instead of “with” before “whom” in the following sentences:”Of whom are you a guest in Rome?”( Di chi sei ospite a Roma?), “Of whom have you been a guest in Rome?”( Di chi sei stato ospite a Roma?), “Of whom are you a schoolmate?”( Di chi sei compagno di scuola?), “Of  whom are you a colleague in the office?”( Di chi sei collega in ufficio?), whereas “With whom are you in love?”( Di chi sei innamorato?) is correct.

I think in fact that “guest”, “schoolmate” and colleague” take “of” instead of “with”  before “whom” in these question clauses.

Anyway, I might be wrong about this, since my knowledge of English is not so thorough.

All the best,

Maria


---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

QUESTION: Dear Maria,

Thank you very much for your help with translating the following sentences:

Di chi sei ospite a Roma?
Of whom are you a guest in Rome?

Di chi sei stato ospite a Roma?
Of whom have you been a guest in Rome?

Di chi sei compagno di scuola?
Of whom are you a school friend?

Di chi sei collega in ufficio?
Of whom are you a colleague in the office?

I was wondering, if it would be possible to include the indefinite article in the Italian sentences as shown below:

Di chi sei un ospite a Roma?
Of whom are you a guest in Rome?

Di chi sei stato un ospite a Roma?
Of whom have you been a guest in Rome?

Di chi sei un compagno di scuola?
Of whom are you a school friend?

Di chi sei un collega in ufficio?
Of whom are you a colleague in the office?


Thank you.

Sincerely,

Rich

Answer
Dear Rich,

it is not possible to include the indefinite article in the Italian sentences that you mention.

In Italian in fact it would sound quite strange to say:"Di chi sei UN ospite a Roma?", "Di chi sei stato UN ospite a Roma?", "Di chi sei UN compagno di scuola?" and "Di chi sei UN collega in ufficio?".

Have a nice weekend with your family,

Maria

Italian Language

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Maria

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Italian is my mother tongue and I'll be glad to answer any questions concerning Italian Language.

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Over 25 years teaching experience.

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I received my Ph.D.in Classics (summa cum laude) from Genova University (Italy).

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