Italian Language/translation

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Question
Dear Maria,

My question is about the following sentence that I found in a novel I am reading.  [“Only Naples” by Katherine Wilson – First Edition -page 5]

“Mi sono mossa subito.”

The novel has translated this sentence as:  “I got myself moving”.

Can you please tell me if you agree with this translation.  

I am thinking that a better translation would be:  “I got moving immediately”.  But, I am also wondering if my translation is too literal.  I would really appreciate your opinion.

Is “mi sonno mossa” a commonly used Italian expression?

I am also wondering about the use of the past participle  -  “mossa”.  

Would I be correct to think that “mossa” is the past participle of the reflexive verb “muoversi” that has been inflected to agree with the understood pronoun (I)  that is referring to a feminine subject  (i.e. – a woman is speaking).

Can you also please tell me if the verb “muoversi” is being used as an intransitive verb in this sentence.  

Can Italian reflexive verbs be intransitive?

Would you also please help me with the correct translation of the verb - “muoversi”.   My dictionary states that “muoversi” means “to hurry up”, “to get a move on”, and/or “to get moving”.   But, I am wondering what the best translation would be.

As always, I really appreciate your help.  Thank you very, very much.  I hope I did not ask too many questions about this one sentence.  

Sincerely,

Rich

Answer
Dear Rich,

though I do not know the context where the Italian sentence “Mi sono mossa subito” has been said in the novel that you mention, I think however that the best translation would be  exactly  “I got moving immediately”.  

As for “Mi sono mossa”, it is nothing but the “passato prossimo” of the reflexive intransitive verb “muoversi” which can have many meanings, according to the context.

For example, we can say “Muoviti!” or ”Se  non ti muovi, perdiamo l'autobus” to indicate that somebody must  do something more quickly, but also “I soldati si mossero contro il nemico” in the sense that the soldiers advanced towards the enemy, or “Il governo si  è mosso a favore delle popolazioni colpite dal terremoto” to indicate that the government has committed itself to help people injured in the earthquake, and "E' ora che tu ti muova e ti cerchi un lavoro" just to say that somebody must work/try to get something.

So, as you can see,  it is right that your  dictionary states that “muoversi” means “to hurry up”, “to get a move on”, and/or “to get moving”.

Lastly, it is correct to think that  “mossa” is the past participle of the reflexive verb “muoversi” that has been inflected to agree with the understood pronoun (I)  that is referring to a feminine subject  (i.e. – a woman is speaking), and that the verb “muoversi” is being used as an intransitive verb in the sentence “Mi sono mossa subito”, since Italian reflexive verbs can be intransitive when the action of the verb falls directly on the subject.  

See also  the “verbi riflessivi pronominali” “accorgersi”, “arrabbiarsi”, “pentirsi”, “ribellarsi”, “vergognarsi”, “imbattersi”,where the action of the verb falls directly on the subject  and the pronominal particles are part of the verb which would not exist without these pronominal particles as in “Non mi sono accorta di nulla” or “Carla si vergognava di aver risposto male a Martina”.

Hope this helps.

Best regards,

Maria

Italian Language

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Maria

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Italian is my mother tongue and I'll be glad to answer any questions concerning Italian Language.

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Over 25 years teaching experience.

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I received my Ph.D.in Classics (summa cum laude) from Genova University (Italy).

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