Italian Language/translations

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Question
Dear Maria,

Would you please tell me if the following translations are correct:

[1]  
Le vecchie scarpe sono state buttate via.
The old shoes have been thrown away.

[2]  
Le scarpe vecchie sono state buttate via.
The old shoes have been thrown away.  -  implies a choice has been made.

When the adjective “vecchie” is placed after the noun – this implies a choice has been made.  
Can you please tell me if it would be better to translate this sentence as:  
The older shoes have been thrown away.


[3]  
Ho conosciuto il giovane insegnante di mia figlia.
I knew my daughters young teacher.


[4]  
Ho conosciuto l'insegnante giovane di mia figlia.
I knew my daughter’s young teacher.  -    implies there is another teacher who is less old.

When the adjective “giovane” is placed after the noun – this implies there is another teacher who is less young.  
Can you please tell me if it would be better to translate this sentence as:
I knew my daughter’s younger teacher.  

Thank you.    As always, I really appreciate your help.  You are especially kind to help me so much with these subtle differences in translation.  It is difficult for me, but I want to keep trying to understand.  Without your help, I would not be able to understand.  So thank you again and again!

Sincerely,

Rich

Answer
Dear Rich,

first of all I have to tell you that your translations are correct.
As for “The older shoes have been thrown away” for “Le scarpe vecchie sono state buttate via”  and “I knew my daughter’s younger teacher” for “Ho conosciuto l'insegnante giovane di mia figlia”, they would not  correspond to the Italian sentences where there is not the comparative which would need a comparison, i.e. an object with which something is compared.

For example, in Italian we should say:”Le scarpe più vecchie tra le due paia sono state buttate via” where  the indirect object “tra le due paia” indicates that we have made a choice between two pairs of shoes and have  thrown away the older  pair.

So, as you can see, the English sentences with the comparative do not correspond to the Italian phrases where the subtle difference between the  position of an adjective before a noun and the position of an adjective  after a noun has no counterpart in English where the adjective is always placed before the noun,without considering the different meaning of the different position of an adjective, as it is in Italian.

To conclude, I’m glad to help you and I thank you very much for your politeness.

All the best,

Maria  

Italian Language

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Maria

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Italian is my mother tongue and I'll be glad to answer any questions concerning Italian Language.

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Over 25 years teaching experience.

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I received my Ph.D.in Classics (summa cum laude) from Genova University (Italy).

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