Italian Language/translation

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Question
Dear Maria,

Would you please tell me if I have translated the following sentence correctly:

Il bestiame era stato tutto radunato nel prato antistante la fattoria.
The cattle had been all rounded up in the opposite meadow from the farm.

Would you also please help me with the following:

[1] Is it acceptable to translate the verb - “radunare” as - “to round up”?

[2] Is “tutto” (all) being used as an adverb in this sentence to modify the verb – “era stato radunato”?

[3] Is “antistante” (opposite) being used as an adjective to modify the noun “prato” (meadow) in this sentence?   
(“prato antistante” = “opposite meadow”)

[4] Is the preposition “from” somehow being implied in this sentence?  Maybe, is the word “da” (from) implied by the adjective “antistante”?

[5] Would it be acceptable to include the preposition “da” in this sentence and say - “dalla fattoria” to mean “from the farm”?

Thank you so very much.  I have spent much time pondering the above and trying to understand what would be correct.   I will really appreciate your help with these questions.  Thank you very, very much in advance!!

Very Sincerely,

Rich

P.S.  I have been very much enjoying trying to translate these sentences.  I learn so much from each and every sentence!!  Thank you, once again, for sending these sentences to me.

Answer
Dear Rich,

your translation of “Il bestiame era stato tutto radunato nel prato antistante la fattoria” as “The cattle had been all rounded up in the opposite meadow from the farm” is correct, though you could have also written “The cattle had been all gathered in the opposite meadow of the farm”.

So, please note that:

[1]it is acceptable to translate the verb - “radunare” as - “to round up”;

[2] “tutto” (all) is being used as an adverb in this sentence to modify the verb – “era stato radunato”;

[3] “antistante” (opposite) is being used as an adjective to modify the noun “prato” (meadow) in this sentence  (“prato antistante” = “opposite meadow”);

[4] the prepositions “from”  or “of” are being implied in the adjective “antistante” which does not need a preposition in Italian  because “antistante” literally means “which is in front of.. /which is  before..” (See e.g. “La casa antistante l’abbazia”)

[5] it is not  acceptable to include the preposition “da” in this sentence and say - “dalla fattoria” to mean “from the farm”, since “antistante” does not need a preposition, as I’ve already said.

Best regards,

Maria

Italian Language

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Maria

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Italian is my mother tongue and I'll be glad to answer any questions concerning Italian Language.

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Over 25 years teaching experience.

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I received my Ph.D.in Classics (summa cum laude) from Genova University (Italy).

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