Jewelry, Gems, & Minerals/choosing a chain

Advertisement


Question
HI,
I have moved to a part of Florida where all my silver tarnishes so quickly it is hardly worth owning. I use the anti-tarnish strips which help a bit, but I cannot keep up with it.
Recently I have gotten some lovely white gold pendants and want at least one chain, which I can switch out between pendants if I have to.
I prefer a diamond cut chain or a box chain, perhaps some kind of rope but no more than 2mm, 1.5 being optimal. I don't really want the boring plain chains that come with pendants, the ones that just are loops attached to each other.
My problem is this. First, I really need 15 inches. I know you can find it but it is really rare and you usually see it in silver. 16 inches is simply a bit long and makes the pendant disappear under the collar of my top.
I cannot afford a solid white gold chain so I am thinking some kind of metal that is rhodium plated or white gold filled and would like to know which would be the most durable (hold the color longer) or easier to find.
My other option is that I have the perfect chain right here but it is 16 inches. Since it is quite thin, can a jeweler cut off an inch and put the clasp back on and if so do you think that would be less expensive than trying to get a new plated one? I could go with titanium or some kind of fake metal but want to keep with something kind of nice since the pendants are 14k.  I have been on the internet for 3 days now and have found nothing that works under $100 and I am looking to stay under $50, hopefully around $35 which I would guess would work if its only plated and thin and short.Thank you for any help or advice you can give.

Diana

Answer
Hi, Diana.

While a rhodium plated sterling chain should do fine for a pretty good while. However, as the rhodium wears off there is nothing to be done to fix it.

I suggest having the 16 inch chain shortened. That is everyday work for most bench jewelers. Be sure the chain end that goes through the pendant loops is a size to work with all the pendants you want to wear. The end now on the chain can be removed, the extra inch cut off and the end reinstalled. Let the jeweler know the size of the end is just right for your pendants to cover the rare chance the end must be replaced.

Generally, this work consists of a soldering of the loop or end to the chain and where I am located the labor would be about $10.  Ask first on price so there is  no unexpected surprise in price.  

Because of the salt air, etc., it is a good idea to rinse the chain in fresh water after a day of wear.


God Bless ans Peace.   Thomas.

Jewelry, Gems, & Minerals

All Answers


Answers by Expert:


Ask Experts

Volunteer


Thomas

Expertise

Have a question about jewelry repair or working with precious metal jewelry and gemstones? For many years up to December 31, 2010, I was a working professional bench jeweler, involved everyday with setting stones in mountings, designing and making jewelry, repairing and limited custom manufacture. If you work with jewelry as a hobby or as a profession, I might be able to help. I deal with the retail business, not mass production. Ask privately if you wish. See the box for that: It keeps your question between us. Please DO NOT ask MAKER'S MARKS, but metal quality marks are fine to ask. Please DO NOT ask diamond prices. See a gemologist for that.

Experience

I have extensive experience in design, service and making of jewelry. I deal mostly with precious metals and gemstones but work with many materials as needed and usable to create an artistic design. My experience also includes freelance photography and photographer of jewelry and similar items for a former employer and individuals. Design of custom items requires reading the desires of the client and being clear on what can be done within that framework...then fulfilling the transition of idea to reality. Effective communications is essential in a working designer/producer and customer relationship.

Education/Credentials
Education is English/Physics! Started in human resources, to advertising, to jewelry...wow, what a road. I have had formal training in jewelry work and many shared experiences with top grade jewelers. We just never know were we will go or be. Follow your best, your dreams, with some discretion! Don't let the work tear up your body along the way as it has mine.

©2016 About.com. All rights reserved.