Joint Pain Relief/foot drop

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Question
Gary, you are a true humanitarian!
I have tried and benefitted from your techniques and send giant thank you's to you each time.
My concern is the foot drop I have been dealing with for a little over a year. I have had MRIs (right side sciatica but nothing showed up in MRI)and nerve conductivity(under knee, outside leg nerve damage)and am left with the "deal with it, accept the limp and get going again" psychological drivel. I try hard to strengthen the right side of my lower body each day.  

I am 61, 5'6" and about 130 lbs, thin frame, fairly active, but walk far less now because of the limitations and stress on other areas of my body from my new (awful) gait. I miss the ease of walking sooo much...

Have you had any success treating foot drop?

Thank you in advance for all you do for so many of us!

Diane

Answer
Hi Diane,

Yes, I've had success with footdrop.  Basically, the muscle that lifts your foot out of the way when you go to take a step is your tibialis anterior, so you need to free it, and anything that affects it.

I'd recommend you go to my Ankle Joint Pain page,
http://www.do-it-yourself-joint-pain-relief.com/ankle-joint-pain-relief.html
where I show you in video 1 how to release your tibialis anterior, and
many other things you should release as well.  
You can also stand and press your tibialis anterior into a tennis ball on a small
bench if that gets you more pressure.

After that, I may go to my main Lower Back Pain Relief page,
http://www.do-it-yourself-joint-pain-relief.com/lower-back-pain-relief.html
and go through those since the nerver origin for your tibialis anterior is you
L5, fifth Lumbar, vertebrae in your lower back.  Really make sure
you release your vastus lateralis,
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vastus_lateralis_muscle
since that can yank on the nerve
that governs your tibialis anterior.

Basically, you've got to free all the tight tissue that could be yanking on the nerve
that governs your tibialis anterior.  The good news is that if you free everything that
tight, including your tibialis anterior, the odds are pretty good you can fix yourself.

I do hope this helps.

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Gary Crowley

Expertise

I can show 95 percent people how to relieve or eliminate their own joint pain for basically every joint in their body. 95 percent of joint pain, even chronic joint pain, is due to the shortening and tightening of tissue around joints. I show people how to release that tight tissue that is causing their pain. Every joint and every person is unique, but the principles to free yourself from pain are the same in 95 percent of cases.

Experience

I've been a Chronic Pain Relief Specialist for over 23 years, and have worked with over 25,000 bodies.

Education/Credentials
Stanford University The Rolf Institute for Structural Integration

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