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Kids Sports & Recreation/Starting a Youth Field Hockey Progam

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Question
Hi,
I am trying to start a youth field hockey program.  I have researched obtaining liability insurance but am confused if to take money I will need to get a bank account, tax id # or become a non profit.  This will be a small club with around 20 girls participating.
Help!
Julie Wilson

Answer
Hi Julie,

I reread your question and will answer it the best I can. I got sidelined with it and wrote a bunch of stuff. However, it might be of value to you so I'm including it.

I don't consider myself an expert in this field, though I have done similar things. Actually, I'm coming up on the same issues.

To take money you don't need anything. They can write the checks in your name. This makes it easy to start off with. I have done this many times.

If you go this way, you should get insurance. The insurance people don't care about anything about profit/non-profit. It is pretty reasonable.

If you want to get a bank account, business license, non-profit, then they are all different issues and you should find someone with more knowledge than me.

Hope this helps!

Ron

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Here are some considerations.

1. I think your best bet would be to contact the national program (http://usafieldhockey.com/clubs) They will have the most help and advice for you. In my case (water polo), they haven't been much help at all. I hope field hockey is different. Either way, its the best place to start.

Also, the organization that you will be competing in should have some information on what/how to set up the team.

2. Every state is different. I'm in California so I know those laws the best.

I have researched starting a non-profit. It costs between $400 and $1,200. There is an company that does the work for you. Here is a site that does it (http://simplenonprofit.com/fiscal-sponsor/). I in know way know if they are good or reputable.

3. In order to save money, I have thought about just doing it as a for profit company. It is easier and getting insurance is not too expensive ($400/year...and it's what you would need to do anyway.

The main disadvantage is the schools in my area (San Jose) will not let you businesses market to them.

4. As to taking money, you can but you should be careful. I am horrible at keeping track of money and funds. So I have a separate account and get an office manager to do it for me. To do this you don't need a separate business license or non-profit or anything (though you might want to). Your bank can help you set this up.

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Ron Usher

Expertise

If you have a question about sports, fitness, activities, and healthy living dealing with kids ages 3 to 18, I can help. I've been coaching and working with coaches, kids and sports for over thirty years. I can also help with questions about adapted PE for kids with disabilities.

Experience

Currently adapted physical education teacher for kids with disabilities ages 6 to 22. Swim and water polo coach for 30 years. Worked as a personal trainer to develop athletic skills for kids in a wide variety of sports. Very knowledgeable in strength, conditioning, balance and skill development. I believe sports are great for kids but they don't replace a healthy, active, family lifestyle.

Education/Credentials
BA physical education, minor in sports psychology. MA in kineseology. Single subject credential in physical education with an adapted PE certificate.

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